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Report Card 2011

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Vanderbilt University

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: Vanderbilt University

Date submitted: September 27, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[  ]  No

[X]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[  ]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: In April 2009 Vanderbilt University released a comprehensive Environmental Commitment Statement, which was developed by over 300 members of Vanderbilt's faculty, staff, and student body and approved by the Faculty Senate and Chancellor (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/pdf/vu_environmental_commitment_statement.pdf).  Vanderbilt University has an Environmental Health and Safety Policy which includes environmental stewardship and sustainability (http://www.safety.vanderbilt.edu/resources/policy_ehsoc.htm).

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[  ]  None

[  ]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[  ]  Talloires Declaration
[X]  Other. Please describe: The VU Chancellor approved our internal environmental stewardship commitment in April 2009.


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[  ]  No
[  ]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: Vanderbilt's newest Chancellor has publicly released his strategic plan, available at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/chancellor/initiatives/.  This new plan includes sustainability as a primary focus and goal, particularly the conservation of energy and the environment.

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: Two committees

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Environmental Advisory Committee (EAC).  The EAC serves in an advisory capacity to the university administration in creating a comprehensive environmental management program for Vanderbilt University.  The committee will advise, develop and promote practices and policies that maximize environmental performance for institutional operations, research, academics, and patient care and will assist in complying with all relevant laws and regulations as well as promoting and integrating sustainability, stewardship, and resource conservation into activities and services.  The environmental management and sustainability program will include a comprehensive environmental management system which will assess environmental impacts, develop and track measures of our progress, and consider and recommend campus-wide short and long-term environmental goals.  More information about the EAC can be found at http://www.safety.vanderbilt.edu/resources/committee_env.htm.

Number of meetings: This committee meets twice per academic year.  Meetings are occasionally conducted electronically.

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

5

Faculty

 

9

Staff

 

6

Students

 

0

Other. Please describe.   

 

0

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

James Clarke  

 

Faculty

Chair 2

 

   

 

Chair 3

 

   

 

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[X]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ] Other:

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

Planning of a full year of sustainability-themed programming and curriculum is in progress for 2011-2012 with the Department of American Studies and the VU Center for Teaching.

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Vanderbilt now has an institutional-wide sustainability policy as a result of work by the EAC.  As a result, a number of advancements have been made in the sustainability of procurement, human resources, and other areas of the university.  VU increased sustainability staff in 2009 by one full-time employee and 6 part-time student positions.  Because VU takes our commitment to the environment so seriously, we proactively joined a consortium of Tennessee colleges that have created a robust environmental management program for environmental compliance, which includes a periodic peer audit program, as well as training and support for the process of implementing an Environmental Management System on each campus.  The EAC has played an important advisory role in this consortium process.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

VU published the baseline greenhouse gas emissions inventory in April 2009, which was reviewed and approved by the EAC.  An update will be published in 2010 which will also be reviewed and approved by the EAC.  Additionally, a greenhouse gas monitoring plan was developed in Spring 2010 to meet the requirements of the new EPA rule.  As a result, greenhouse gas emissions are now being quantified, tracked, analyzed and trended and will be reported publicly to the EPA as required.  The EAC will also continue to evaluate the impact on the institution of proposed climate regulations, such as the Waxman-Markey/Kerry-Lieberman bills and the EPA endangerment finding.

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Vanderbilt’s investment office extensively reviews prospective and existing investment managers’ environmental and sustainability investment philosophy as well as current holdings.  Fund managers who do not support the university’s environmental and sustainability investing philosophies are screened out during this process.  Vanderbilt has a number of investment managers who focus on environmental and sustainability initiatives within our investment portfolio.  Several examples include: 1) significant investment in renewable wind energy in the southwestern and Central United States; 2) investment in international corporations that are mentored by VU’s investment company to ensure ethical business practices, safety programs that protect workers, and environmental protection programs; 3) support of social and economic development in emerging markets through agricultural-based investments which enable underserved small and medium-sized farmers to receive short-term financing that isn’t typically available through local banks; and 4) investment in programs that employ and train local workers on farming practices to develop locally-managed and staffed farms in the Southern African continent. For more information, see the Vanderbilt endowment survey.

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Vanderbilt has continued the ThinkOne energy conservation educational program this year which encourages energy conservation through behavioral change.  Nighttime temperature setbacks were implemented in a number of buildings containing electronic control systems significantly reducing building energy consumption and costs.   The university chose this year to establish a centrally-funded revolving loan fund that allows departments to pay for energy efficiency retrofits in their buildings and repay the fund over time at no interest.  Extensive lighting and temperature occupancy sensor retrofits are also underway.  Vanderbilt continues to be an Energy Star partner and encourages its students and employees to purchase Energy Star rated products.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

Vanderbilt Dining has established a Dining Advisory Committee, comprised of students and staff to address all aspects of dining on campus, including the procurement of sustainable foods.  Wherever possible, efforts are made to provide seasonal, local, natural and organic foods.  Vegetarian and vegan entrees are available at each meal at various locations.  Recycling containers are available at numerous dining locations on campus as well.  Hydration Stations for quickly filling reusable water bottles were recently installed at two main dining locations, The Commons Center and Rand Hall, to encourage the campus community to refill reusable water bottles rather than purchasing and eventually discarding bottled water.  Dining employs a Sustainability Supervisor who is responsible for researching, implementing, and managing all of Dining’s green initiatives and participates in the planning and implementation of many campus-wide sustainability initiatives throughout the year.

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Vanderbilt University has a total of 10 LEED certified buildings on campus, the largest conglomeration of such buildings in the southeast.  Since August 2009, three campus buildings have been awarded LEED certification: Chef James Bistro (Certified LEED-CI), Benson Hall (Silver LEED-CI), and Library Archives (Silver LEED-NC).  The academic campus also intends to build all new construction projects to LEED certification standards.

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

This past year, the Eco-Dores residential peer-to-peer sustainability education program was launched.  Thirty-four undergraduate students volunteered to serve as representatives of their respective residence halls, attending monthly meetings to learn about different sustainability topics and devising strategies to educate fellow students and encourage sustainable behavior in on-campus residential areas.  This program will continue during academic year 2010-2011.  Additionally, an undergraduate class in Earth and Environmental Sciences produced a student guide to sustainable living on campus.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Plans are underway to install an electric-car recharging station at Vanderbilt.  The Department of Energy has targeted Tennessee as a roll-out state to establish a network of battery-charging stations for all electric cars because of Nissan’s release of the LEAF electric vehicle.  Nissan is a local manufacturer with a large plant very close to Vanderbilt.  Vanderbilt is co-sponsoring with TVA construction of a prototype “smart station” on its property to support this new battery-charging station network.  A solar array and energy-storage component will be part of this station.  In addition to Vanderbilt’s robust Free Ride to Work mass transit program discussed elsewhere, Vanderbilt implemented a Zipcar hourly-rental program on campus last year with an initial 5 cars.  Due to the success of the progam, two additional cars are being added this year. VU Plant Operations department decided this year to invest more heavily in the use of fully-electric carts for maintenance work instead of gasoline-powered vehicles and recently added 6 new carts for a total of 16.  At the same time, they reduced their fleet of gasoline-powered vehicles by retiring unneeded vehicles.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Recycling was implemented at all major athletics events for football, basketball, and baseball for the first time this past year while Commencement, move-in and move-out recycling efforts were expanded.  267 new recycling bins were distributed on main campus and toner cartridge, cell phone, small battery and pen recycling were all made much more readily available to students and employees.  Vanderbilt University recycled almost 2.5 million pounds (1,244 tons) of paper, cardboard, aluminum, and plastic this year.

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Vanderbilt has committed to water conservation through investments made in low flow, no touch faucets; low flow toilets; dual-flush toilets; and waterfree urinals.  Each year, fixture retrofits result in water savings of approximately 9 million gallons.  Non-potable groundwater that collects in utility tunnels beneath campus is also reclaimed and used to irrigate athletic fields and in cooling towers at the on-campus cogeneration plant.  By capturing this water and redirecting it, Vanderbilt is reducing water purchases by 50 million gallons a year.  Vanderbilt has achieved a 50% reduction in water consumption since 2007.

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee II

 

5b)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Vanderbilt Student Government (VSG) Environmental Affairs Committee.  This committee's responsibilities include: overseeing the sustainability needs and priorities on campus for students; serving as VSG's liaison to the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office (SEMO) and all campus environmental groups; developing, coordinating, and promoting recycling efforts, energy conservation, and the proposed phases of Think Gold, Act Green (TGAG) with the members of TGAG; and expanding the TGAG Coalition.  The VSG Environmental Affairs Committee also strives to develop unique, cost-effective initiatives for lessening Vanderbilt's use of resources, invigorates the student body to be more environmentally friendly, and encourages the university to take a leadership role in the global battle against climate change.  Current projects include the placement of energy clings on residential light switches and installation of campus hydration stations.  The TGAG Coalition is composed of leaders from various groups (with and without environmental focuses) on campus and works with these organizations to develop, coordinate, and promote recycling and energy/resource conservation on campus.

Number of meetings: This committee meets montly throughout the academic year.

 

6b)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

0

Faculty

 

0

Staff

 

8

Students

 

25

Other. Please describe.     

 

0

 

7b)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

Ben Kahn

 

Student

Chair 2

 

Kate Goudge

 

Student

Chair 3

 

 

 

8b)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X]  Other:  Student Body President

 

9b)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress 

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Review and approval of Vanderbilt's institution-wide environmental commitment statement.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Review and approval of Vanderbilt's baseline greenhouse gas inventory.

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

Developed proposal to establish a student Green Fund for donations from alumni to fund sustainability projects and initiaves on campus.

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Planning and procurement of Energy Clings, which will encourage students to practice energy conserving behaviors.  These clings have been purchased and are in the process of being placed throughout all undergraduate residence halls.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee III

 

5c)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name:

Number of meetings:

 

6c)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7c)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

 

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8c)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ]  Other: 

 

9c)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress  

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens     

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit      

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name: Sustainability and Environmental Management Office (SEMO)

Year created: 2008

Description: The Sustainability and Environmental Management Office (SEMO) was formed in January 2008 and is a collaborative venture between VEHS and VU Plant Operations department.  SEMO's mission is to initiate, promote, coordinate, evaluate, and encourage environmental management and sustainability initiatives that improve Vanderbilt's impact on the community and environment.

Number of staff in office (in FTE): 5

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title: Sustainability Director

Department: Sustainability and Environmental Management Office

Time worked (in FTE): 1

Job description: Leadership and supervision of Sustainability and Environmental Management Office (SEMO); responsible for development, management, and coordination of sustainability programs across the academic campus and medical center; supervision of institution-wide environmental compliance efforts; coordination of promotional and educational materials for sustainability programming; identification of new opportunities for sustainability activities and funding mechanisms; service as SEMO liaison to administrative departments and offices; participation in strategic planning efforts to promote the long-term sustainability of the university.

 

12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managingsustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Environmental Mangement Systems Coordinator, Senior Safey Officer

 

Sustainability and Environmental Management Office

 

1

 

Development and implementation of a comprehensive Environmental Management System through all applicable Vanderbilt University departments; coordination of non-laboratory operational environmental compliance efforts; technical expertise and support for academic campus and medical center departments; and supervision of a part-time student intern and/or Federal Work-Study students.

Campus Recycling Coordinator

 

Sustainability and Environmental Management Office

 

1

 

Development and management of recycling program on campus; completion of solid waste assessments; identification of new recycling opportunities; delivery of recycling education; and supervision of Recycling Coordinator for Residential and Events Operations, two recycling technicians, and several student workers.

Sustainability Professional

 

Sustainability and Environmental Management Office

 

1

 

Development and management of various specific sustainability programs; identification of new opportunities for sustainability activities and funding mechanisms; management of SustainVU websites, newsletters and social media presence; coordination of environmental and education events; and supervision of a part-time student intern and/or Federal Work-Study students.

Recycling Coordinator, Residential and Events Operations

 

Sustainability and Environmental Management Office

 

1

 

Coordination of university events recycling and residential recycling; supervision of student assistants and event volunteers; and management of recycling performance metrics.

Campus Energy Manager

 

Plant Operations

 

1

 

Identification of and implementation of energy efficiency and retrofit projects at Vanderbilt.  Tracks energy metrics and supports student energy conservation initiatives.

Sustainability Supervisor

 

Dining

 

0.5

 

Manages Dining's green initiatives; proposes new sustainability opportunities; tracks Dining Services sustainability metrics.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

SustainVU is Vanderbilt's sustainability website (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu).  A Facebook page was created this year to further improve sustainability communication at Vanderbilt University (http://www.facebook.com/pages/Nashville-TN/SustainVU/234117583919).  Monthly email newsletters containing sustainability news, events, and information are districuted through a listserv with over 400 subscribers as well.

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Cleaning products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Computers/electronics

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Lighting

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Office supplies

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Paper products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[  ]

 

[X]


Other description: All vendors are assessed according to the following criteria: environmentally responsible practices including sourcing and transportation practices, the use of post-consumer content and cradle-to-cradle product design and production.  Vanderbilt's Sustainability Director is involved in reviewing vendor proposals and choosing vendors for major contracts, such as office supplies, janitorial supplies, solid waste management, etc.  Vanderbilt's Procurement program offers numerous environmentally friendly products and product lines, which are designated as such to Procurement users.  Areas not listed above include solid waste management, furniture, chemical supplies, lab supplies and equipment, and travel.  Procurement also supports the promotion of local, small, disadvantaged and minority owned businesses.  Procurement and Disbursement Services' green website is available at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/procurement/procurement/green.shtml.

 

15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[X]

 

Appliances

 

30%

 

[X]

 

Building products

 

 

[X]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

90%

 

All Apple and Dell computer products purchased meet Energy Star requirements.  Apple and Dell are VU's preferred providers.

[  ]

 

Heating and cooling

 

 

[X]

 

Lighting and fans

 

20%

 

[  ]

 

Plumbing

 

 

 

Additional comments: Information Technology Services is committed to purchasing Energy Star rated computers and computer equipment (printers, etc.).  Additionally, VU facilities departments preferably purchase Energy Star rated building products.  Individual departments are responsible for purchasing their own appliances.  However, Vanderbilt University is an Energy Star Partner and encourages students and employees to purchase appliances that are Energy Star rated though its Green Procurement program.

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

 

 

 

Facial tissues

 

63.8%

 

4.8%

 

59.4%

 

Napkins

 

 

 

 

Notepads

 

 

 

 

Office paper

 

63.8%

 

4.8%

 

59.4%

 

Paper towels

 

63.8%

 

4.8%

 

59.4%

 

Other. Please describe.

 

63.8%

 

4.8%

 

59.4%

 

Toilet paper

 

Additional comments: Additionally, 3.9% of office paper products purchased by Vanderbilt are certified by the Sustainable Forestry Initiative.  Individual departments are responsible for purchasing their own paper products.  However, Vanderbilt University encourages students and employees to purchase paper products with at least 30% post-consumer recycled content through our primary office supply vendor.  FSC-certified paper is also available for purchase through both our primary office supply vendor and VU Printing Services.  Many large university printing efforts are now printed on FSC-certified paper with post-consumer recycled content and vegetable-based inks.  All standard business cards and letterhead ordered through Vanderbilt University's Printing Services are printed on recycled stock.  A green printing guidance document that advises Vanderbilt community members on green printing options such as paper that is FSC-certified, contains recycled-content, or is processed chlorine-free was developed in 2009-2010 by the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office, VU Printing Services, and VU Creative Services.

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

Some

 

90%

 

Computers

Product 2

 

 

 

Product 3

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]

 

Alumni green fund

 

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

The capital budget funds major energy and water upgrade/retrofit projects as well as LEED certification for new buildings and large renovations.

[  ]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects     

 

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

Operating budgets fund more minor energy and water conservation projects, such as bathroom upgrades or small lighting retrofits, as well as all other sustainability initiatives.

[X]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

The university chose this year to establish a centrally-funded revolving loan fund that allows departments to pay for energy efficiency retrofits in their buildings and repay the fund over time at no interest.

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

[  ]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

Vanderbilt's Sustainability and Environmental Management Office has formed partnerships with individuals who serve as sustainability champions in various offices and departments on campus.  These champions are typically either one person who has a keen interest in sustainability or groups of employees that have formed departmental-based "Green Teams."  Additionally, VU has a specific peer to peer educational program specific to energy conservation as part of the ThinkOne energy conservation program.

[  ]

 

Green office certification program

 

Development of a green office/department certification program is underway.

[X]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

The Sustainability and Environmental Management Office has created a series of greening guides that provide the VU community with practical suggestions for reducing the environmental footprint of their respective operations.  Three greening guides (departmental, event, and holiday) have already been published and are available at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/greeningguides.php.  Development of a laboratory greening guide is underway and will be published in Fall 2010.

[X]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

Development of sustainability education materials for new employee orientation and mandatory annual Safety Fair training programs is underway and will be launched August 2010.

[  ]

 

Other

 


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CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20)Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[]In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date         

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

In progress

 

 

 

In progress

 

2008

 

In progress

 

 

 

In progress

 

2007

 

Calendar year

 

255,401

 

311,226

 

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/ghg_inventory.php

 

2006

 

Calendar year

 

245,860

 

298,366

 

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/ghg_inventory.php

 

2005

 

Calendar year

 

248,076

 

297,418

 

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/ghg_inventory.php

 

 

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

No


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage):

Baseline year:

Baseline emissions level:

Target year:

 

Additional comments:

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced:

Baseline year:

Baseline emissions level:

Year achieved:

 

Additional comments: Not yet determined; greenhouse gas emissions for the 2008 and 2009 calendar years are under development.

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

In progress

2008:

 

In progress

2007:

 

0.027 MTCO2e per GSF

2006:

 

0.028 MTCO2e per GSF

2005:

 

0.029 MTCO2e per GSF


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

In progress

2008:

 

In progress

2007:

 

22.00 MTCO2e per full-time student

2006:

 

21.41 MTCO2e per full-time student

2005:

 

21.97 MTCO2e per full-time student

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units) .

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
479,398,441 MBtus (140,497,814 kWh)         
Gross square feet of building space: 8,568,883

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption : 537,667,331 MBtus (157,574,740 kWh)

Gross square feet of building space : 9,208,635

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[X]    Cogeneration

[X]    Temperature setbacks

[X]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

0%

[X]

 

Economizers

 

4%

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

10%

[  ]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

0%

[  ]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

0%

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

3%

[  ]

 

Lighting sensors

 

0%

[  ]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

0%

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

100%

[X]

 

Metering—steam

 

6%

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

2%

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

6%

[  ]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

0%

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

0%

[X]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

1%

[X]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

5%

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

1%

[  ]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

0%

[X]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

1%; 3% .

 

Description: Chiller replacement project in 1% of building space (290 tons of reciprocating chillers replaced with modular high efficiency Multistack System with frictionless maglev bearings).Condensate and hot water metering in 3% of building space.


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[X]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[X]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[  ]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[X]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[X]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[  ]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Vanderbilt has an educational program specific to energy conservation at VU termed the ThinkOne energy conservation program (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/thinkone).  This program encourages energy conservation through behavioral change and was developed in collaboration with the Department of Psychology and the Center for Evaluation and Program Improvement based on peer-reviewed academic research from other areas of behavioral change, such as recycling and weight loss literature.  This program seeks to reduce energy consumption at Vanderbilt by 10% through behavior change alone.

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[X]

 

Biomass

 

1%

 

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[  ]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[  ]

 

Photovoltaics

 

 

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

 

Other description:


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

No

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems:

Total MBtus generated annually:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

Coal

 

47.1%

Natural Gas

 

6.1%

Nuclear

 

33.7%

Petroleum

 

0%

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

13.1% (7% hydroelectric; 6.1% other renewable)

Other. Please specify:

 

0%



Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid: 81%


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards .

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase: July 2010
Length of contract: No termination date
Average annual quantity (kWh): 300,000
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents: 0.23%

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

98,861,500 MBtus (2009 calendar year) (988,615 MMBtus)

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

1%

Coal

 

66%

Geothermal

 

0%

Natural gas

 

33%

Petroleum

 

0%

Other. Please specify:

 

Cogeneration

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FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey .

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users: 18,143
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 6,016

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
18,502
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost): 5,651

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[X]

 

Glass

[X]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[  ]

 

Other. Please list:

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

14.5% (2009 calendar year)

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[X]

 

[X]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[X]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[X]

 

[X]

Ballasts, appliances

If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

More information about Vanderbilt's Electronics Recycling Program is available at http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/recycling_computers.php.  Vanderbilt university utilizes Sims Recycling Solutions (Sims) for the recycling of its e-waste, the same company that services Apple Corporation's electronic waste.  Sims has a local recycling facility in Lavergne, TN, a zero-landfill waste policy, and all items sent to Sims are recycled in the United States or Canada.  Sims provides comprehensive "downstream" tracking of all materials shipped to their facilities.  To learn more about Sims Environmental Responsibility Program, visit http://us.simsrecycling.com/key-issues/environmental-responsibility.

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

Greater than 99%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[  ]  

 

Academic buildings

[  ]  

 

Offices

[  ]  

 

Outdoors

[  ]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

Due to Vanderbilt's location within the metropolitan Nashville area, the university is not permitted to compost food waste, only landscaping waste.  Metropolitan Nashville health department regulations require institutions who want to compost food waste to use an industrial compost facility; they are not allowed to compost food waste on a scale larger than "backyard-size."  No such facility is located within the state of Tennessee.  A small backyard-sized, educational compost site on campus uses pre-consumer food scraps from the Commons Center dining facility to produce compost for educational purposes and for soil enrichment and tree rejuvenation on selected campus grounds locations.

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

Printing is available to students for $0.04 per page for black and white and $0.25 per page for color.  Vanderbilt students and employees are encouraged to print only when necessary, and when printing to use the double-sided feature on printers with this capability.  Library printers are set to default to double-sided printing.

[X]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

Vanderbilt organizes an "Earth Friendly Move-In" that aims to reduce the amount of waste generated at the start of each school year from move-in weekend.  In an effort to reduce waste generated through the procurement of plastic water bottles, water cooler filling stations are placed throughout campus spaces for students and their families to use.  First-year students receive a reusable water bottle that is made in the U.S. of BPA-free plastic that can be filled from these stations.  Students and families are encouraged to bring their own reusable watter bottles as well.  Recycling of molded Styrofoam and cardboard also occurs on a large scale during Earth Friendly Move-In.  All materials included in housing assignment packets are printed on paper containing recycled-content.  Recycling for paper, plastic, and aluminum, already provided in each residence hall, is also available.  In 2009, 15,000 pounds (7.5 tons) of cardboard and 3,400 cubic feet of molded Styrofoam were generated for recycling during move-In.

[X]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

Students are encouraged to participate in an "Earth Friendly Move-Out" at the close of each school year.  Donated clothing, electrnics, appliances and other items are collected in residence halls and sold by local nonprofit organizations to raise money.  Furniture and other large items are collected by the Salvation Army, and non-perishable food items are collected by Second Harvest Food Bank.  Additional locations are available to take non-working electronics and appliances like dorm refrigerators, computers, TVs, etc., to be safely recycled in accordance with all laws and regulations.  Recycling for cardboard, paper, plastic, and aluminum, already provided in each residence hall, is also available.

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs     

 

VU has a Surplus Equipment Store, which allows the Vanderbilt community and the public to purchase surplus items from our warehouse.  VU also has a "Surplus Swap" program, an online forum where the community can list surplus items, such as office supplies and computer equipment, which might be of use to others on campus.  Development of a Vandy FreeSwap database where students and employees can securely list free items available no longer wanted and available to others is currently underway and will be launched in Fall 2010.  Vanderbilt also organized a one-time materials exchange program, Vanderbilt Helping Vanderbilt, in May 2010 to benefit victims of the devastating Nashville floods.

[  ]  

 

Other

 


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GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Vanderbilt University's academic campus intends to build all new construction projects to LEED certification standards.  A statement about sustainable building practices can be found on Campus Planning and Construction's website at http://www.cpc.vanderbilt.edu/CPC/GreenBuildings/Sustainable_Building_Page.html.


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings:11

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

441,994

 

Vanderbilt One Hundred Oaks; Chef James Bistro in Rand Dining Hall

Silver-level

 

211,333

 

Benson Hall/Old Central; Crawford House; Gillette House; Library Archives; Sutherland House

Gold-level

 

296,404

 

The Commons Center; Hank Ingram House; Murray House; Stambaugh House

Platinum-level   

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria :4

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

301,646

 

Student Life Center; Buttrick Hall; Featheringill/Jacobs Hall

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

 

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

 

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

 

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:
1
Combined gross square footage: 300,811
Building names: 2525 West End Avenue

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:
N/A
Total number of buildings:
0
Combined gross square footage: 
N/A
Building names: N/A

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

54%

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   14


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use        

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

The Commons Center

 

114,078

 

Community dining facility and parking area

 

Community dining, study, and recreational facility

 

The old dining facility, the Hill Center, was partially demolished and partially renovated in order to build the LEED gold certified Commons Center.  Approximately 75% of the materials were salvaged, recycled or sold.  During this process, green space was added to Vanderbilt's campus where a parking lot had previously been located.

The Commons New Houses (Crawford House, Hank Ingram House, Murray House, Stambaugh House, Sutherland House)

 

274,245

 

Married-student housing

 

Undergraduate housing

 

Five new LEED gold and silver-certified residential facilities were constructed to house incoming freshmen on the Commons Campus where previously underutilized married-student housing had been located.

The Commons Historic Houses (East House, Gillette House, North House, West House, Memorial House)

 

219,436

 

Undergraduate housing

 

Undergraduate housing

 

Instead of being completely demolished and rebuilt anew, these five residence halls were significantly renovated while still retaining their original shell.

Library Archives

 

37,557

 

Former U.S. Tobacco Company national headquarters and drying warehouse; clothing pattern manufacturing facility

 

Library archival storage facility with unique humidity and temperature parameters to ensure preservation and durability of contents

 

The building was originally constructed in 1910 and had operated as U.S. Tobacco's national headquarters and a clothing pattern manufacturing facility; after acquiring the space, Vanderbilt shelled out and rebuilt the interior into a specialized library archival space.

Buttrick Hall

 

90,313

 

Laboratory space

 

Offices and lecture halls

 

Biology laboratory space was renovated into lecture halls and office space for the College of Arts and Sciences Deans' offices.

One Hundred Oaks

 

N/A

 

Retail mall

 

Patient care clinical space attached to retail and hospital administative space

 

Vanderbilt invested millions of dollars in an extensive green renovation of One Hundred Oaks mall in 2008 to convert the dying mall into a world-class medical clinic.  The bottom floor of the mall remains occupied by retail while the upper floor of the mall is now used by Vanderbilt University Medical Center for patient care clinics and hospital administrative offices.  This renovation has improved the surrounding neighborhood, revitalizing business establishments and drawing numerous visitors to the area. The renovation of OHO also removes patient traffic from downtown Nashville and makes visits more convenient and enjoyable as they can shop while they wait for their doctor's appointments.  The OHO revitalization concept has garnered numerous urban planning and sustainability awards, with the most recent coming from the Urban Land Institute, and was awarded LEED certification in 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 10,092

Square footage: 7,574,386

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 12,514

Square footage: 9,208,635

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Plant Operations has a green building operations and maintenance standard operating procedures manual; however, it is not available on the Internet.  Green cleaning is now used in all campus buildings, as well as a number of other significant green operations and maintenance programs.


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings: 1
Combined gross square footage: 55,164
Building names: Gillette House

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: 4
Combined gross square footage: 301,646
Building names: Buttrick Hall; Featheringill/Jacobs Hall; Student Life Center

 

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members) .

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
18,143
Water consumed (gallons): 612,700,000

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
18,502
Water consumed (gallons): 303,900,000

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[  ]  

 

Building water metering

 

0%

[X]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

2%

[X]  

 

Gray water systems

 

0.02%

[  ]  

 

Laundry technology

 

0%

[  ]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

0%

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

29%

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

8%

[X]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

16%

[X]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

15%

[X]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

N/A

[  ]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

N/A

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description:

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[X]

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[X]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe:

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy) . If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


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STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College .

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

Mayfield Living/Learning Lodges

 

House

 

200

 

Groups of ten students are assigned to Mayfield Living/Learning Lodges where they pursue a self-directed, year-long program of educational activities, including, but not limited to, community service projects.  Requirements that each Lodge must fulfill include montly reports, weekly meetings, lectures, and participation in an educational program for the campus community.  Each spring, a selection committee of deans, faculty members, staff from the Office of the Dean of Students, and student representatives of the Vanderbilt Student Government and Residential Education reviews the application packet submitted by each group and interviews the proposed lodge's spokesperson prior to the housing selection process.  For the past several years at least one of the Mayfield Living/Learning Lodges has had a sustainability focus.

The Commons - Ten Residence Houses

 

Building

 

1602

 

An extensive living/learning first-year student environmental education program has been developed for the Commons.  The ten houses are used in the program as a living and learning laboratory and are supplemented by year-long environmental seminars, speaker series, tours, field trips, community service projects, and environmental movie screenings.  This environmental education program won the 2008 Governor's Environmental Stewardship Award for Green Schools.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[X]  

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[X]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[X]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[X]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend: All new students receive educational materials discussing sustainability prior to arrival on campus.  Additionally, the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office participates in a resources and information fair, which is attended by all first-year students during orientation.  All first-year students must participate in a semester-long environmental seminar series.Incorporating sustainability into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways: At the beginning of each school year, information sessions are held with all RAs, who then disseminate information to their constituent residents.  All student desk workers in The Commons Center and Sarratt Student Center also receive a brief lesson in sustainability initiatives on campus.Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects: A student organizations fair is held each Fall to introduce new and returning students to service and organizational opportunities on campus, including those focused on the environment and sustainability.  Incoming freshmen also participate in Commodores in the Community, a full day of service to organizations at Vanderbilt and in the Nashville community.  Past projects have assisted the Vanderbilt Biodiesel Initiative, the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office, and local community gardens.  Additionally, the new Eco-Dores program is a peer to peer sustainability educational program that organizes activities and events to get students in their residence halls actively engaged.Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets: Efforts to reduce waste generated during orientation and move-in are made wherever possible.  Rather than purchasing bottled water, students, families, and friends are encouraged to bring their own reusable water bottles that can be filled up at water cooler stations throughout the Commons during move-in.  Plastic, aluminum, cardboard, paper, and molded Styrofoam recycling have also been incorporated into move-in operations and events.

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

15

 

10; Two, full-time paid sustainability interns are also employed during the summer.

Unpaid positions

 

0

 

0


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

http://www.vanderbilt.edu/sustainvu/eco-dores.php

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

0

 

N/A

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

0

 

N/A

Uncompensated positions.

 

34

 

2

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, three or more competitions.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Battle of the Bulbs: Commons House Energy Competition

Year Initiated: 2008

Website: http://studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/spear/projects.php

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

Competition winners in the past have been awarded a pizza and massage party.

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

Each Commons residence is encouraged to save as much energy consumption as possible based on each building's energy consumption for the same month for the year before.

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: 8% energy reduction

Lasting effects of competition: Continued awareness of energy behaviors and energy conservation throughout the school year.

Additional Information:

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Campus-Wide Energy Competition

Year Initiated: 2010

Website: http://www.insidevandy.com/drupal/node/13227

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

 

[X]

 

Faculty

 

[X]

 

Staff

 

[X]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

Competition winners were awarded a pizza and massage party.

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]  

 

Energy conservation

 

Each residence hall is encouraged to save as much energy as possible based on each building's energy consumption from the same month of the year before.

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: Average of 5% energy reduction in most residence halls.

Lasting effects of competition: Continued awareness by students of energy behaviors and energy conservation throughout the school year.

Additional Information:

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Recyclemania

Year Initiated: 2010

Website: http://www.recyclemaniacs.org/index.htm

 

Frequency that competition is run: Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Waste reduction

 

Vanderbilt's student community is encouraged to reduce waste and recycle as many items as possible during the competition.

[  ]  

 

Water conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:

Lasting effects of competition:

Additional Information: Vanderbilt also initiated a Greek Recycling Competition in 2010.  Three campus fraternities competed against each other to see who could generate the most aluminum.  A gift card to a store of the winner's choice (Home Depot) was purchased from revenues generated from aluminum recycling.  Approximately 486 pounds (0.25 ton) of aluminum were recycled as a result of the Spring 2010 Greek Recycling Contest.

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

Students Promoting Environmental Awareness and Responsibility (SPEAR)

 

SPEAR’s mission is to increase environmental awareness and promote more environmentally sustainable habits and infrastructure within the Vanderbilt and Nashville community. Various projects sponsored by this organization include: cardboard crew, compost discovery area, house energy competitions, Climate Change Solutions Week, pollinator garden and Rites of Spring recycling.

 

http://studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/spear/

 

 

 

 

 

Think Gold, Act Green Coalition

 

The “Think Gold, Act Green” Coalition, managed by Vanderbilt Student Government’s Environmental Affairs Committee, serves as a liaison to the various environmental groups on campus and works with these organizations to develop, coordinate, and promote recycling and energy/resource conservation on campus. It also strives to develop unique, cost-effective initiatives for lessening Vanderbilt’s use of resources, invigorates the student body to be more environmentally friendly, and encourages the university to take a leadership role in the global battle against climate change.  Meetings are held on a monthly basis.  Current projects include the placement of energy clings on residential light switches and installation of campus hydration stations.

 

http://studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/vsg/our-team/committees/environmental-affairs

 

 

 

 

 

Vanderbilt Sierra Club

 

Vanderbilt Sierra Club “practices, promotes, and educates on the responsible use of the earth’s ecosystems and resources, protection of wild habitats, and restoration of natural and human environments.” VSC’s most recent project was hosting an Eco-Fashion Show with SPEAR.

 

http://www.vanderbiltsierraclub.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Owen Net Impact

 

Owen Net Impact is a member of the larger Net Impact community with over 150 student and professional chapters worldwide. Net Impact aims to positively contribute to a community of new leaders in fields such as corporate social responsibility, social entrepreneurship, nonprofit management, international development, and environmental sustainability who will use business to improve the world.  Net Impact has in the past hosted events such as a Green Career Symposium, “Green Week” and the Net Impact National Conference.  This group has also partnered with the Sustainability and Environmental Management Office to devise business plans and programming for various environmental projects and efforts on campus.

 

http://owennetimpact.org/

 

 

 

 

 

Vanderbilt Biodiesel Initiative

 

VBI is Vanderbilt’s student-run biodiesel production system, which converts waste vegetable oil into biodiesel fuel that is used by some of the university’s diesel-fueled engines and the grounds department’s landscaping equipment. One of the byproducts of this process, glycerin, is used by the group to make EcoSuds soap, which is sold at several locations on campus. VBI also aims to educate others about the viability of biodiesel as an alternative fuel.

 

http://studentorgs.vanderbilt.edu/biodiesel/

 

 

 

 

 

Vanderbilt Environment and Sustainability Initiative (VESI)

 

This organization aims to enhance students’ abilities to achieve excellence in environmental management professions, increase environmental awareness within the Vanderbilt and surrounding communities, and promote Vanderbilt’s standing as a leader in environmental management solutions. VESI’s future goals include a hosting a stream clean-up with local youth, establishing partnerships with Vanderbilt campus organizations and Nashville businesses, providing internships from in the fields of environmental engineering and environmental management, and is in the process of implementing Vanderbilt’s first bike-share program.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vanderbilt Initiative for Vegetarian Awareness (VIVA)

 

VIVA aims to advocate a healthy lifestyle that has a positive effect on humans, animals, and the planet.  VIVA hosted a screening of Food, Inc. followed by a panel discussion this past semester.

 

 

 

 

 

 

VMS Sustain

 

This group functions out of the School of Medicine and seeks to promote a more balanced and sustainable relationship with the environment through the following: education of peers and the greater Vanderbilt community about ways to conduct their private and professional lives in an environmentally respectful way; advocacy for institutional responsibility and sustainable planning in the areas of patient health, energy use and recycling; and action to develop a community dedicated to forwarding sustainability as an issue of health, respect, and responsibility to the future.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Law Society

 

The Environmental Law Society is an organization for students interested in learning more about environmental law and environmental legal careers. This group has sponsored numerous speakers, panels, and activities since its inception and aims to strengthen relationships between Vanderbilt Law students and local environmental groups.

 

http://law.vanderbilt.edu/student-resources/student-organizations/environmental-law-society/index.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

VUMC Cares

 

VUMC Cares is a medical student graduate group that promotes environmental and social responsibility among the medical community. This organization is responsible for implementing solid waste recycling within School of Medicine areas and creating an environmental/recycling lab pledge program. Over the last several years this organization has sponsored lectures that have addressed issues in the environment and how modern medicine affects or is affected by them.

 

http://www.mc.vanderbilt.edu/root/vumc.php?site=recyclinic

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

238

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[X]  

 

100 percent electric

 

24

[  ]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

0

[  ]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

0

[  ]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

0

[  ]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

0

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

0

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

0

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 

0


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

80%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

1%

Carpool/vanpool

 

6%

Public transit

 

3%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

20%

Walking

 

70%

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

10%

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

1%

Carpool/vanpool

 

3%

Public transit

 

5%

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

90%

Walking

 

1%

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[  ] No

[X] Yes, to faculty and staff

[X] Yes, to students

 

Description:


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Vanderbilt has invested in its own ride match software system, which facilitates the identification of potential carpool and vanpool partners in the Vanderbilt community (anyone with a Vanderbilt email address).  For more information please visit http://www.VMCRideMatch.com.

[X]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

The Regional Transit Authority (RTA) subsidizes free emergency taxi fare (up to 8 rides per year per person) for carpool and vanpool members.  Parking discounts are also available for days employees must drive to work.

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Vanpools coordinated by VU are given preferential parking on campus.

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Vanderbilt has invested in its own ride match software system, which facilitates the identification of potential carpool and vanpool partners in the Vanderbilt community (anyone with a Vanderbilt email address).  For more information please visit http://www.VMCRideMatch.com.

[X]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

The Regional Transit Authority (RTA) also subsidizes free emergency taxi fare (up to 8 rides per year per person) for carpool and vanpool members.

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Vanpools coordinated by VU are given preferential parking on campus.

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

Vanderbilt’s “Free Ride to Work” program fully subsidizes (100% discount) the cost for all Vanderbilt employees and graduate, professional and medical students to ride the local mass transit buses to and from work each day.   The Regional Transportation Authority’s (RTA) Relax-and-Ride program and Vanderbilt Coach Service provide express bus route transportation between downtown Nashville and surrounding areas.  Discount tickets (23%-38% depending on route) are available for all Vanderbilt employees, medical, graduate, and professional students, and medical center volunteers who would like to take advantage of regional/ inter-city bus service.   Vanderbilt also provides a 60% discount for employees who wish to ride the commuter train, the Music City Star.  A free shuttle bus service between the Nashville Riverfront Music City Star Terminal and Vanderbilt’s campus coincides with train arrivals and departures.   Parking discounts are also available for days employees must drive to work.

 

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[X]  

 

Faculty

 

Vanderbilt’s “Free Ride to Work” program fully subsidizes (100% discount) the cost for all Vanderbilt employees and graduate, professional and medical students to ride the local mass transit buses to and from work each day.   The Regional Transportation Authority’s (RTA) Relax-and-Ride program and Vanderbilt Coach Service provide express bus route transportation between downtown Nashville and surrounding areas.  Discount tickets (23%-38% depending on route) are available for all Vanderbilt employees, medical, graduate, and professional students, and medical center volunteers who would like to take advantage of regional/ inter-city bus service.   Vanderbilt also provides a 60% discount for employees who wish to ride the commuter train, the Music City Star.  A free shuttle bus service between the Nashville Riverfront Music City Star Terminal and Vanderbilt’s campus coincides with train arrivals and departures.   Parking discounts are also available for days employees must drive to work.

[X]  

 

Staff

 

Vanderbilt’s “Free Ride to Work” program fully subsidizes (100% discount) the cost for all Vanderbilt employees and graduate, professional, and medical students to ride the local mass transit buses to and from work each day.   The Regional Transportation Authority’s (RTA) Relax-and-Ride program and Vanderbilt Coach Service provide express route transportation between downtown Nashville and surrounding areas.  Discount tickets (23%-38% depending on route) are available for Vanderbilt employees, medical, graduate, and professional students, and medical center volunteers who would like to take advantage of regional/ inter-city bus service.   Vanderbilt also provides a 60% discount for employees who wish to ride the commuter train, the Music City Star.  A free shuttle bus service between the Nashville Riverfront Music City Star Terminal and Vanderbilt’s campus coincides with train arrivals and departures.   Parking discounts are also available for days employees must drive to work.

[X]  

 

Students   

 

Vanderbilt’s “Free Ride to Work” program fully subsidizes (100% discount) the cost for all Vanderbilt employees and graduate, professional, and medical students to ride the local mass transit buses to and from work each day.   The Regional Transportation Authority’s (RTA) Relax-and-Ride program and Vanderbilt Coach Service provide express route transportation between downtown Nashville and surrounding areas.  Discount tickets (23%-38% depending on route) are available for Vanderbilt employees, medical, graduate, and professional students, and medical center volunteers who would like to take advantage of regional/ inter-city bus service.


[  ] Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

Vanderbilt offers free shuttle services to campus visitors, students, faculty, and staff from various locations on campus.  Vandy Vans, operated by the Vanderbilt Police Department, provides pick up and drop off services a pre-designated points on campus to students from 5 PM to 5 AM during the school year.  Vanderbilt's Shuttle Service provides visitors, faculty, and staff a convenient means of moving between buildings and locations on campus for free.

 

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

Vanderbilt offers free shuttle services to students, faculty, and staff to a select number of satellite campus locations and locations off campus.  All faculty, staff, professional and medical graduate students can ride the local MTA buses for free to go to meetings in downtown Nashville.

 

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

 

If yes, please provide details below.


Year created:
Number of bikes available:
Usage fee per hour:
Usage fee per day:

 

Annual membership fee for students: 

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: A campus bike share program is currently under development.

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:
Service fee:
Description:

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created: 2008
Total number of vehicles:  5
Number of hybrid vehicles: 0
Usage fee per hour: $7-10
Usage fee per day: $60-77


Annual membership fee for students:  $35

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  0 for dept; $35 individuals

Other annual membership fee:  $0; $50

 

Description: The Zipcar program was initiated on campus in 2008 and has proven to be very popular, necessitating the addition of 2 more Zipcars in September 2010.  Departmental memberships are available at no cost.  Any community member who is not affiliated with Vanderbilt University can receive membership for an annual fee of $50 and a one-time application fee of $25.

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

Vehicle traffic is limited at Vanderbilt to the perimeter and select areas of campus.  Roads do not exist through the interior portions of campus.  Additionally, freshmen may not purchase parking permits or park on campus.  Bike racks and showers are conveniently located throughout campus to encourage the use of alternative transportation.  Vanderbilt's master plan is very careful to preserve or increase green space on campus and to keep driving and parking on the perimeter of campus.  A portion of Vanderbilt's campus is designated as a National Arboretum.

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[X]  

 

Telecommuting

 

All employees are eligible for telecommuting or a condensed work week but implementation is dependent upon a combination of the following: the employee’s specific job duties and requirements, the staff member’s supervisor, and the department’s Employee Relations Representative.

 

Telecommuting allows a staff member to fulfill their primary job responsibilities at a location other than Vanderbilt.  This arrangement must be approved by the administrator for the area and reviewed by the department’s Employee Relations Representative.

[X]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

All employees are eligible for telecommuting or a condensed work week but implementation is dependent upon a combination of the following: the employee’s specific job duties and requirements, the staff member’s supervisor, and the department’s Employee Relations Representative.

 

Flexible work schedules include variable arrivals, four 10-hour shifts, three 12-hour shifts, etc.  Work schedules are determined by the business needs of the work group and are managed accordingly.  A staff member who requests a deviation in scheduling must do so in writing to the supervisor for approval.

 

Additional comments: Vanderbilt supports alternative work arrangements as viable options for staff based upon the needs of the job, work group or organization.  Vanderbilt’s full alternative work arrangements policy may be viewed at http://hr.vanderbilt.edu/policies/hr-023.pdf.  Many departments use these options and have their own policies and procedures as well.


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STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:        

Urban

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

168

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

9,208,635

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

11,696

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

818

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

90%

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

VU has a new pollinator garden on campus.

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

A major in Environmental Science is available at the undergraduate level.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

A minor in Environmental Science is offered at the undergraduate level.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

Graduate-level environmental programs are available in Environmental Engineering (ME, MS, PhD), Environmental Science (MAT, MS, PhD), and Environmental Law (JD).

 

 

 

 

 

[X]     

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

Environmental Management (MS, PhD) is available through the Vanderbilt Center for Environmental Management Studies and the Vanderbilt Institute for Energy and the Environment.  Both programs emphasize sustainability in corporate management and include study of corporate social responsibility, environmental economics, environmental sociology, etc.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

WilSkills is Vanderbilt’s outdoor program, which aims to integrate academic study with practical experience in the wilderness, using the classroom and the environment, to host lectures, film screenings, discussions, and trips. The trips are designed to teach students the basic techniques of backpacking, caving, rock climbing, and whitewater paddling.  Vanderbilt also has an outdoor recreation center, which offers outdoor equipment rental and trips to faculty, staff, and students.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]     

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

Vanderbilt participated in Recyclemania in the benchmark division for the first time this year.

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Student trustee position

 

Vanderbilt has a young alumni position on the Board of Trust who is a graduating senior.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

There are sustainability concentrations in a number of majors at Vanderbilt such as public policy, psychology, economics, etc.

 


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