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Report Card 2011

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University of Pennsylvania

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: University of Pennsylvania

Date submitted: July 27, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[  ]  No

[X]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description:

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/cap.html. The University of Pennsylvania’s Climate Action Plan lays out the strategies that were adopted by the University to achieve sustainability goals, as well as the means to track and communicate progress to the Penn community and external audiences.

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[    ]  None

[X ]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[    ]  Talloires Declaration

[X]  Other. Please describe: Sustainable Campus Charter 


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[    ]  No
[X ]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[    ]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: http://www.pennconnects.upenn.edu/growing_greener/growing_greener.php

 

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: One committee

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee and six subcommittees (Utilities and Operations, Physical Environment, Academics, Waste Minimization and Recycling, Transportation, and Communications).

Number of meetings: 2 full committee meetings and 12 subcommittee meetings

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

5

Faculty

 

10

Staff

 

12

Students

 

11

Other. Please describe.   

 

 

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

Anne Papageorge

 

Administrator

Chair 2

 

 

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

 

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[X ]  President/Chancellor
[X ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[   ] Other:

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

A new minor is available to Penn students who have an interest in sustainability. The Sustainability and Environmental Management minor, a recommendation of the University’s Climate Action Plan, is a partnership between the School of Arts and Sciences, the Wharton School, and the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The minor provides students with a scientific and environmental understanding of sustainability and an ability to assess risk and management change associated with environmental issues. The 2010-11 academic year has been named the Year of Water by the Office of the Provost. Throughout the year, interdisciplinary lectures, conferences, discussions, tours and exhibits will focus around the theme of water. In partnership with the Year of Water, the annual Penn Reading Project (a reading assignment for incoming freshmen and series of orientation activities) is The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters by Rose George. The Penn Reading Project activities have been coordinated with the Year of Water programming, and included a lecture to all freshmen by Ms. George, a Penn Alum and scholar. The Year of Water Grants Program will offer members of the Penn community grants up to $750 for water-related projects – conservation, education, efficiency, and awareness. Launched in 2010, the School of Design offers a new two-year Masters of Ecological Design program. This program focuses on the dynamic relationship between the natural and built environment, and is available to students studying architecture, landscape design, planning, urban design, and historic preservation. The incoming class of a dozen students arrived in September, 2010. The Organizational Dynamics Masters program, in the School of Arts and Sciences, offers a new concentration in sustainable development through a partnership with DOW Special Materials, formerly Rohm and Haas Company. DOW Special Materials is an international leader in cutting-edge technology for architectural paints, coatings, and finishes. The $100,000 gift from DOW supports both the new concentration and the creation of a sustainable development graduate certificate program, targeted at mid-career professionals. This innovative partnership forges the way for academic intuitions and corporate firms to work together on issues and best practices of sustainability. Toward Environmental Sustainability on Penn’s Campus, an innovative class that culminates with student presentations to senior administrators on ways to advance the University’s sustainability goals and reduce the University’s carbon footprint. This course provides students with an opportunity to apply their work in the classroom to real world problems, is co-taught by the University’s Environmental Sustainability Coordinator, and involves numerous senior staff as guest lecturers, such as the Vice President of Budget and Finance, the Director of Purchasing, the Director of Dining, the Chair of the Architecture Department, and so on. The class concludes with a presentation by students to senior administrators of final, on-campus sustainability projects. Two Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) courses related to sustainability are offered in the 2009-2010 academic year. ABCS courses involve hands-on, real-world problem solving by students. ABCS courses aim to foster civic engagement in the student body through community service projects throughout Philadelphia. Mark Alan Hughes, former Director of Sustainability for the City of Philadelphia, is teaching Sustainability in Action in the Fall 2010 semester. Greenworks, the City of Philadelphia’s sustainability plan, will serve as the organizing framework for real-world problem solving projects in the recitations for the course. Students work in recitations will range from providing energy strategies for businesses in University City to tree planning outreach to residents in West Philadelphia. The Director of the Philadelphia Water Department’s Office of Watersheds, Howard Neukrug, will teach a Spring 2011 course which will build upon the Year of Water engaging students in local watershed challenges. Facilities and Real Estate Services offers 4 to 6 summer sustainability internships. Currently, this year’s summer interns are working on a myriad of sustainability issues ranging from student Eco-Rep program development, LEED Portfolio Program, to the creation of a vehicles buyer’s guide for the University. The T.C. Chan Center for Building Simulation and Energy Studies, a partnership between Penn School of Design and Tsinghua University, brings together experts from around the world with students to research and develop strategies for sustainable environments and high-performance, energy-efficient buildings. The Office of the Provost awarded six Academic Research Grants through Climate Action Plan grant funding this year. All six research projects focus on sustainability with topics ranging from nonprofit sustainability management models to studying relative sea level on Georgia coast.

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

In 2007, the University of Pennsylvania’s President Amy Gutmann signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). This pledge committed Penn to developing plans for significant reduction of its emissions of climate-altering greenhouse gases. The Climate Action Plan lays out the strategies that will be adopted by the University of Pennsylvania to achieve these goals, as well as the means to track and communicate progress to the Penn community and external audiences. The Climate Action Plan responds to the aspirations of the ACUPCC by providing the summary of Penn’s current sustainability efforts and the framework for future goals and initiatives. Sustainability reports are submitted quarterly to the Office of the Executive Vice President and the President on six sustainability indicators. A new Green Campus Partnership website launched in September 2009. This website serves as an access point for all sustainability initiatives at Penn. www.upenn.edu/sustainability In December, the Wharton School launched its new sustainability website, Sustainability@Wharton. The website provides a detailed look at sustainability initiatives across the Wharton community, including projects that have already been implemented and those that are currently under review. The Green Campus Partnership’s bi-monthly newsletter, On College Green, was launched in September 2009 and provides students, faculty, staff, and the broader Penn community with updates on current sustainability objectives and messaging from University leadership on sustainability goals. . Many of the 12 schools and centers at Penn have appointed sustainability coordinators to oversee sustainability initiatives at their schools/centers, including the School of Arts and Sciences, the School of Engineering and Applied Science, The Wharton School of Business, the Nursing School, the School of Veterinary Medicine, the Division of Public Safety, and the Department of Recreation and Intercollegiate Athletics. School/Center Sustainability Coordinators hold monthly meetings to share best practices and showcase sustainability efforts. The Penn Green Fund was launched at the start of the 2009-2010 academic year to provide financial support for selected sustainability initiatives from members of the Penn community. While rewarding creativity and innovation, priority funding is given to projects that meet the following criteria: • demonstrate a quantifiable return on investment; • secure additional funding; • that will be applied across campus; • engage multiple stakeholders within the Penn community; and • be effective in educating or changing behavior. In January of 2010, Penn began delivering “Sustainability 101” lectures across the University. These presentations cover Penn’s commitment to sustainability and the goals of the Climate Action Plan, as well as how individual staff and faculty members can contribute to those goals. Thus far, these presentations have reached over 500 faculty and staff members across the majority of schools and centers on campus. Similarly, in March of 2010 Penn initiated the Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps program. The goal of this program is to provide Penn faculty and staff with the tools to reduce the environmental footprint of their office or lab through improved environmental awareness and behavior change, and to build capacity and leadership across the schools and centers by identifying, educating, and empowering individuals to champion Penn’s environmental and conservation goals. Eco-Reps meet monthly to share best sustainable practices between departments, as well as brief trainings by Penn’s sustainability team on green topics. They then take what they learn back to their offices to share with others and implement change through peer education and sustainability projects. Recent monthly meetings have included discussions about behavior change tools, electricity conservation, and a panel on recycling at Penn. The program currently has over 100 Eco-Reps, spanning the majority of schools and centers on campus. On June 17, 2010, Penn hosted the Power Down Challenge to see just how much electricity the University community could save over the course of one hour. By having the Penn community reduce electricity use during this defined, manageable span of time, the hope was that people would begin to identify areas to save electricity not just during the one hour, but all the time. This event coincided with PGM’s test of the emergency load shedding system which helps to prevent blackouts. Results indicate that Penn reduced electricity usage by nearly 13 megawatt hours during the one hour-long Power Down Challenge (double our initial goal for the event). This is equivalent to approximately a 21% reduction in the typical electrical load on campus at this time. In addition to these University-wide programs, Penn has also targeted outreach and training to our building administrators across campus. Sustainability topics are often part of this group’s quarterly meetings, and recent presentations have included a general overview of sustainability at Penn, and a report out on the results of the waste audit we undertook last year. The Winter Break Power Down Challenge was developed as the inaugural event for the Student Eco-Reps program. College house residents in Rodin, Hill, and King’s Court English were asked to pledge to unplug their appliances, turn off their lights, and close their windows in order to conserve energy during winter break. Pledge rates were then calculated to see which house achieved the highest percentage participation in relation to their house’s overall population, and over three hundred compact fluorescent bulbs were given out to pledging students. Eco-Reps worked to educate residents on a variety of topics including phantom loads, energy efficient appliances, compact fluorescent bulbs, Penn’s Climate Action Plan and energy reduction goals, and easy tips to reduce energy usage. Baseline energy data was taken in all Penn’s college houses, in order to observe the energy reduction impact of the Power Down Challenge in future years. In April 2010, Penn hosted the Ivy+ Sustainability Coordinators’ Conference. Sustainability Coordinators from Harvard, Columbia, Princeton, Yale, Brown, Dartmouth, Cornell, Johns Hopkins, Chicago, Stanford, Duke, and Georgetown attended to discuss best practices on their campus. This year’s conference theme was Sustainability in Athletics. Athletic Directors and staff from the Ivy+ attended the conference to provide expert knowledge of athletics in tandem with sustainability efforts. Penn’s Environmental Sustainability Coordinator attended an international Building Energy Conference in Hong Kong. The conference hosted by the Tsinguha University and the TC Chan Center, and highlighted the newest technologies in building energy performance technologies in Japan, Europe, China and the US. The Vice President of Facilities and Real Estate Services was asked by the Mayor of Philadelphia to co-chair his sustainability advisory board, organizing the 25 members to provide advice and feedback on city operations and environmental initiatives as they launch a city-wide sustainability plan. Penn presented at the National Center on Science in Education Conference in DC in October 2009. Representatives from Facilities and Real Estate Services and the TC Chan Center presented Penn’s Climate Action Plan and sustainability efforts in building energy modeling.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[X]

 

Signficant

 

The University of Pennsylvania’s Climate Action Plan – see Administration above. The recommendations of the Climate Action Plan are organized into six themes: Utilities & Operations, Physical Environment, Academics, Waste Minimization & Recycling, Transportation, and Communications. The full Climate Action Plan runs some 120 pages, and can be found at http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/cap.html , but some highlights include • Utilities & Operations: Eliminate the growth in electrical usage in existing buildings through education and management; improve the efficiency of utility distribution systems; and adopt conservation measures such as building recomissioning, metering, and incentives for better energy performance. The Utilities & Operations goals are to reduce energy usage by 5 percent from the 2007 baseline in fiscal year 2010, and a 17 percent decrease from the 2007 baseline by 2014. • Physical Environment: Adopt LEED Silver Certification, with Penn-specific goals, as a minimum standard of new construction and major renovations; provide training to Penn staff on sustainable design and construction practices; and implement sustainable protocols for site planning and landscape maintenance. The goal is to create and maintain a sustainable campus environment, decrease building energy consumption, and increase education and awareness of sustainable design. • Transportation: Increase use of public transportation; improve bicycle and pedestrian environments; and improve the fuel efficiency of Penn’s vehicle fleet. The goal is to emphasize a quality pedestrian environment with safe, efficient transportation services for the university community. • Waste Minimization & Recycling: Institute a comprehensive waste reduction and recycling policy; and provide widespread education about why and how Penn recycles. The goal is to double Penn’s recycling rate to 40% by 2014. • Academics: Launch a new University minor in Organizations and Environmental Management; provide sustainability workshops for faculty and graduate students; and expand student participation in sustainability research. The goal is to make sustainability part of the curriculum and educational experience for all Penn students. • Communications: Establish messages that reinforce individual behavior is critical in meeting our greenhouse gas reduction, recycling, energy conservation, and transportation goals; ensure that the Green Campus Partnership website is an accurate and user-friendly repository of valuable information; and create events that galvanize the campus community and bring attention to the campaign. The goal is to develop clear, concise, and accurate information about Penn’s sustainability commitments, while encouraging Penn’s community to participate in continuing learning opportunities in this field. Penn, in partnership with the TC Chan Center for Building Simulation and Energy Studies has published greenhouse gas inventories for 2007, 2008, and 2009. All three inventories can be found in the Climate Action Plan, http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/cap.html

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[X]

 

Moderate

 

The University of Pennsylvania’s Social Responsibility Advisory Committee (SRAC) is composed of student, faculty, and staff representatives along with alumni representatives. SRAC designs shareholder engagement policies and practices that advocate improvements to the social and environmental performance of the companies in which Penn has holdings. Two of SRAC's Guiding Principles are related to Global Climate Change and Sustainability Reporting.

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

As outlined in the Climate Action Plan, Penn is committed to reducing energy usage by 17 percent from the 2007 baseline by 2014. The University works towards this goal by focusing on improving the efficiency of existing buildings’ utility systems and adopting conservation measures such as building re-commissioning, metering, and incentives for better energy performance. Energy audits have been performed on 19 campus buildings. Re-commissioning work has been executed on 6 campus buildings. Penn continues to install meters throughout campus to be able to better measure energy usage and promote conservation. Eighteen steam meters and fifteen chilled water meters have been installed to date in this fiscal year. The majority of Penn’s buildings already have electric meters installed. Penn is currently implementing a comprehensive lab air monitoring program, using the Aircuity lab ventilation system. The Aircuity system provides central computerized monitoring of multiple lab spaces and vivaria to evaluate airborne contaminants, and automatically adjust air flow rates in response to impurities detected. By reducing air changes per hour and regulating ventilation rates on an as-needed basis, the system reduces energy use for fans, pumps, and other air handling equipment, as well as the need to refrigerate or warm air delivered to the occupied spaces. The Aircuity Pilot Program measurement and verification period completed in November 2009. The Aircuity system was expanded to service all of Hill Pavilion vivarium spaces once the pilot was complete. Since the installation of the pilot Aircuity system, significant energy savings have been realized in addition with no deterioration in indoor air quality, with estimated payback periods in less than two years. The Aircuity program is now being expanded to the Translational Research Center, now under construction. The initial investment for installation in the Translational Research Center will be recouped in estimated 2.2 years of energy savings. The University’s air conditioning is handled by a central chilled water plant system which allows for superior cooling efficiency. Chilled water is pumped from two major plants to the campus buildings via underground water mains. The chiller plants are equipped with the capacity to monitor consumption levels to reduce energy cost during the winter, spring, and fall seasons by using the cool ambient air to cool the chilled water. We use varying flow of condenser water in the condenser towers to drive down the condenser water, to pre-cool the chiller refrigerant to improve efficiency. In addition, one of the chiller plants has an ice tank, where a glycol mix is chilled to 22 degrees Fahrenheit to freeze the water at night when electricity rates are lower. The two ice tanks, each 272,500 gallons, have an internal melt capacity of 21,560 ton-hrs. The centralized steam heating system at Penn connects to about 70% of the buildings and provides approximately 90% of the total heat for the campus. The steam is purchased from a local provider with a combined heat and power (CHP) plant across the Schuylkill River in South Philadelphia. The annual energy imported as steam used for heating typically represents about 46% of the total imported utility energy. In 1997 the plant was upgraded with more efficient equipment and its fuel switched from distillate oil to natural gas, which is the cleanest of the fossil fuels in carbon emissions. Even more importantly, it became a combined heat and power facility at that time, providing electricity directly into the PJM grid. This process significantly reduced the carbon emissions associated with each form of resultant energy – both electricity and steam. Penn has created a centralized program for energy saving projects and retrofits for campus buildings, called the ERF (Energy Reduction Fund). The ERF combines maintenance renovations with new capital projects, and includes mechanisms to track and monitor energy performance. The ERF is intended to be a self-sustaining program funded through the utilities budget surplus, and employs a point scoring system to prioritize projects. Penn is currently in the process of upgrading and insulating steam pipes across campus to ensure energy efficiency. Penn posts campus energy usage data on the Facilities and Real Estate Services website as an awareness builder for energy conservation. The Penn Green Fund, described in the Administration section above, has funded the following energy projects on campus: • Quad Room Heating/Cooling Occupancy Sensors - Installation of thirty occupancy sensors to monitor and control energy for heating/cooling units in a student residence. • New Bolton Center: Energy Efficiency/Sub-Metering Project -Meter installation to measure energy use. • Greening the Castle Fraternity - Implementation of building energy retrofits. The brothers will also host a series of educational events about sustainability and their Green Fund project to educate their chapter, the Greek community, and the wider campus community. • Translational Research Lab: Power Factor Correction - Installation of a 6x100 KVAR automatic capacitor bank to improve the building’s energy performance. A 480 volt secondary switchboard, concrete housekeeping pad and a 1200 amp conduit and cable feeder from the switchboard to the capacitor bank would also be installed as part of the project, which is expected to equal a 10-20% reduction in monthly electrical bills. • Morris Arboretum: Warmth from Waste Wood - An EPA-certified hydronic heater unit (an outdoor wood-fired boiler) will heat the Horticulture Garage through the use of waste wood. Fuel cost savings from the installation of the hydronic heater are expected to equal a 30-50% reduction in consumption. • College House Energy Competition - A managed competition for energy reduction and behavior change in select College Houses. • Sigma Chi Fraternity: Window Restoration - Energy-saving building envelope improvements for a historic building. • School of Medicine: Lighting Analysis and Implementation - Lighting retrofits, including installation of occupancy sensors and LED fixtures.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

At Penn, 20% of food served in residential dining facilities is produced within 100 miles of Penn. The University also supports local farms with a farm-to-institution program and hosts a weekly on-campus farmers market where students may purchase items using their dining plan cards. There are three farmers’ markets located on campus and in the surrounding University City neighborhood. On April 22, 2010, Bon Appétit at Penn Dining helped diners protect the planet this Earth Day one forkful at a time by hosting its first annual Low Carbon Diet Day at Penn. Penn Dining hosted the Scrape Bucket Campaign this year. The Campaign was a five day challenge to measure the amount of food waste in campus dining halls. Results were posted daily in each of the dining halls. Student Eco-Reps volunteered at the Scrape Bucket Campaign and provided other students with information about composting and other sustainability initiatives at Penn. From February 1-5, 2010, Bon Appétit at Penn Dining sponsored Food Week, a series of events to promote healthy diet choices and awareness about what exactly happens to your food before it hits your plate. Some of the Food Week activities were a screening of Food Inc: Hungry for Change, a how to prepare healthy food demonstration, and lecture about food justice. Philadelphia Winter Harvest is a buying club that runs from November to April through which participants may order locally grown foods and produce to be delivered weekly to a pick-up site in the greater Philadelphia area. Penn’s campus has its own pick-up location in Hill College House staffed by members of FarmEcology from 5:15 - 7:15 PM on Thursday evenings and may expand to a second campus location in the near future. Every two weeks, patrons place their orders online, selecting the various types and quantities of items. The product list is expansive while varying throughout the season, as certain crops become more or less abundant. Penn's decision to partner with Bon Appétit came, in part, because the company’s industry leading practices tie in closely with the University’s sustainability commitments. Bon Appétit’s ground-breaking initiatives, such as the Low Carbon Diet program, align perfectly with the University’s Climate Action Plan and will help enhance Penn’s overall goal to reduce its carbon footprint. Here are several highlights of the sustainability commitments of Bon Appétit at Penn Dining: o Farm to Fork: At least 20 percent of the food served by Bon Appétit at Penn Dining is from within a 150-mile radius and grown or prepared by small farmers and artisans supporting nearby farms, including Hendricks Farm, Telford, Pa.; Lehman's Eggs, Greencastle, Pa.; and Heritage Tree Fruit, Richwood, N.J. o Eat Local Challenge: On Tuesday, September 29, Bon Appétit at Penn Dining hosted the 2009 Eat Local Challenge. Within each café, there was at least one designated station highlighting a lunch option made with ingredients from within 150 miles of Penn (The only exception is salt). At Kings Court café, 100 percent of the food served was made from local ingredients, including Penn Vet Ice Cream, provided by the Marshak Dairy at Penn Veterinary Medicine’s New Bolton Center campus in Kennett Square. o Sustainable Seafood: Bon Appétit’s seafood is purchased in accordance with the Monterey Bay Aquarium’s Seafood Watch guidelines for sustainability. o Low Carbon Diet: Through this revolutionary program Bon Appétit is implementing operational changes to minimize our impact on climate change. o rBGH Free Milk: Bon Appétit purchases milk from Wawa all of which is free of artificial bovine growth hormones. o Antibiotic Reduction: Turkey and chicken are raised without antibiotics as a routine feed additive, and our hamburgers are made from natural beef. o Cage-Free Eggs: Our eggs are Certified Humane and cage-free. • In 2009, a Green Fund grant funded the establishment of a demonstration vegetable garden and urban agriculture project on Penn’s campus. The Penn Garden broke ground west of Rodin College House this spring with student volunteers helping to lift grass, till soil, lay topsoil and compost, build wooden frames for raised beds, and plant seeds. Students also installed an irrigation system at the garden, and the fall harvest was donated to a local food bank. (Note: please see the Dining Survey for more information about Penn’s commitment to sustainable food practices)

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

The Physical Environment goals of the Climate Action Plan aim to create and maintain a sustainable campus environment, decrease building energy consumption, and increase education and awareness of sustainable design. As put forth in the Climate Action Plan, all new buildings at Penn are designed to achieve a LEED Silver rating or higher. The new Horticultural Center at Morris Arboretum is planned to achieve a LEED Platinum certification, Penn’s first certification of this level. According to the U.S. Green Building Council the Horticulture Center will be the first newly constructed, not-for-profit Platinum Level LEED® Certified building in the greater Philadelphia region, and only the second Platinum Level LEED Certified building in the entire state of Pennsylvania. The restoration and addition to the University’s Music Building is Penn’s first LEED Silver academic building on campus. The building showcases energy-efficient building systems, quality indoor environments, a pilot desk-side recycling program, a new green cleaning program, and recycled and salvaged building materials. Penn Park, the University’s new 24-acre, $40M recreation and athletics development, which broke ground in Summer 2009, is designed to the highest standards of environmental performance. Designed by Michael Van Valkenburg Associates and the Office of the University Architect, the design will transform currently abandoned parking lots (with 70% impervious surface) into a public multi-use park. Its green features include: • all appropriate and native plant species to reduce maintenance and irrigation needs; • full accessibility for bicycles with bike parking; • comprehensive recycling services; and • an underground cistern to capture the first one inch of rain of all rain events in Philadelphia (only about 6 events exceed this intensity annually). This cistern has over 13,000 cubic feet capacity, and the water will be used for irrigation of the fields. (For more information, see http://www.pennconnects.upenn.edu/find_a_project/alphabetical/penn_park_alpha/penn_park_overview.php) Shoemaker Green, a three-acre site in front of the historic Palestra Basketball Arena, was recently selected as a pilot for the Sustainable Sites Initiative, the first rating system for green landscape design, construction and maintenance in the U.S. This space will be transformed from impervious tennis courts and parking into a new campus park. This project will improve water quality, minimize runoff, restore biomass to the site and increase local biodiversity with habitat planting and use of living soils. All roofing projects are evaluated for the feasibility of green roof replacement and installation. Currently, the University has six green roofs installed on campus, on buildings ranging from nursing education to residence halls. Penn recently is implementing a LED Streetlamp Pilot Study to install custom-designed LED lamps into Penn’s traditional lamps, which will be used for all existing lamps and test the viability of LED streetlamps for overall campus expansion. Penn has a Building Salvage and Reuse Program. The program uses LEED construction and demolition waste protocols. Penn assesses high value assembly and components like glue laminated beams, windows, radiators, carved stone, paving.

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

PennGreen is an environmentally focused week-long, pre-orientation program offered to 40 incoming freshmen that provides students with an environmental introduction to Penn and Philadelphia, and offers them a chance to form relationships with peers interested in environmental activism. Students arrive at Penn a week early to attend workshops and participate in environmental service learning projects prior to the beginning of classes. These students learn not only how to live more sustainably and minimize their impact on the environment, but how to adapt these practices to the Philadelphia area. The College House Eco-Reps program is an environmental leadership program, open to all Penn College House residents, that focuses on raising awareness of environmental issues and encouraging sustainable practices on Penn's campus. In 2009/2010, the program was piloted in three college houses. In 2010/2011, the program will be expanded to all 11 college houses. Additionally, Penn is launching the Greek Eco-Reps program which will be open to open to all fraternity and sorority members. The Penn Environmental Group received a Green Fund grant to fund the creation of the Green Acorn Certification Program. This program is an environmental certification process and checklist for local businesses and vendors, aimed at improving the environmental purchasing, operations, and disposal choices of Penn-area restaurants, street vendors, and retail shops. A total of eight businesses have received Green Acorn Business Certification. In the fall, a freshmen Management-100 course will assist Green Acorn in enhancing their promotional strategy to encourage Penn students to visit certified businesses. The Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee has student representation from both undergraduate and graduate student populations. Additionally, two students sit on the Green Fund Review Board, a nine person committee. In November 2010, Penn will host the Philadelphia Global Water Initiative’s fourth annual conference. Not only will this conference focus on the UN Millennium Development Goals related to water but will also build off of Penn’s academic theme year, the Year of Water. Off-Campus Services has a section of their website dedicated to sustainable living practices for off campus students. They provide information related to energy conservation, local food, water conservation and more. http://www.business-services.upenn.edu/offcampusservices/?p=renting_step_by_step/living_green_in_your_apartment The Undergraduate Assembly (UA), the umbrella student government organization, at Penn has a committee on Housing, Sustainability, and Facilities. Two of the UA’s sustainability efforts last year were the creation a Greening Events Guide and the successful pilot of dorm room recycling bins. Both the School of Arts and Sciences and the Wharton Business School established their Student Sustainability Advisory Board last year. The goal of the Advisory Boards is to provide undergraduate and graduate students with a forum to voice their concerns and implement ideas pertaining to sustainability, as well as provide feedback to the administration on new and existing initiatives. The Board hosted the first of a series of sustainability town hall meetings in the spring for fellow students to inform them of School and University initiatives currently underway, and answer questions regarding sustainability.

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Business Services is launching a “green rate” parking permit program for low-emitting vehicles in the fall. Penn staff and faculty who commute in cars that exceed a score of 50 in the rating system established by the Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) will receive a discounted rate on monthly parking fees. For faculty and staff, Penn, in partnership with the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), provides a 10 percent discount for the monthly regional rail, subway, trolley, and bus services, and pre-tax benefits for all public transit in Philadelphia and surrounding communities through SEPTA’s Commuter Pass Program and TransitCheks. Up to $115 worth of TransitCheks may be purchased through payroll deduction on a pre-tax basis. The following regional transit providers participate in the TransitChek program: SEPTA, Dart, NJ Transit, Amtrak, and PATCO. In the last year, commuters have also been able to put pre-tax dollars on a PATCO Freedom Pass, a program that has proven very popular. For full-time students, Penn in partnership with SEPTA, offers a semester-based transit pass, PennPass. Penn also holds an annual Commuter Fair where representatives from SEPTA, Amtrak, Philly CarShare, NJ Transit, the Greater Philadelphia Bicycle Coalition, PATCO, etc. come to campus to answer commuters’ questions and promote the use of public transportation. During New Student Orientation Penn also provides a Pro-Seminar on using public transportation and Penn’s on campus transportation. Penn also maintains a relationship with AlterNET rides, a web-based ride-sharing system program available to faculty, staff and students who are interested in carpooling. Penn Transit purchased four bi-fuel vans (liquid propane and gasoline/E-85) which were delivered in July, 2010. These vans produce 50% less toxic tailpipe emissions. Vans will be wrapped with sustainability marketing. Over the summer of 2010, a “Vehicle Buyers Guide” was developed for purchasing officers in schools and centers across campus. This guide assesses fuel efficiency, program need, and carbon emissions to help decision-makers choose sustainable vehicles. Facilities and Real Estate Services is continually assessing crosswalks for enhanced pedestrian safety and convenience at major intersections on campus. The 34th Street Crosswalk on campus is currently being upgraded increase pedestrian safety. This guide was made available in September 2010. To promote commuting to campus by bicycle, Penn facilities is constructing twelve new bike corrals (50+ bikes each) between 2010 and 2015. The corrals are located at the perimeter of campus, with security lighting and closed circuit security cameras manned 24 hours a day by Penn’s Division of Public Safety. The Division of Public Safety offers free bike registration and discounted bike locks. Penn Transit has installed bike racks on buses, there are bike racks in two (37 and 40 – 34th & Ludlow and Fresh Grocer garages) of the Penn Parking garages, and as of September 2010, Penn has the capacity to park 2570 bikes on campus. Penn Transit Services offers bus, shuttle, paratransit, and charter services to University of Pennsylvania community. As of spring 2010, the Penn Transit website includes a GPS tracking system that allows users to pinpoint on their computers and mobile phones the location of Penn Transit buses on East and West routes to assist in user scheduling. In 2008, Penn partnered with Philly CarShare, a local non-profit founded by Penn alumni, to become the largest North American university car share partnership. With over 30 cars within a ten-block radius of campus, these cars, rented by the hour, offer students, faculty, and staff the mobility of their own car without the cost. The membership of this service reports owning 10,000 fewer cars than they would otherwise. As part of this partnership, Penn staff receive discount rental rates, allowing for a reduction in fleet size. New buildings incorporate accommodations for alternative fuel vehicles, like charging stations for electric cars. For example, there are 21 charging stations existing in the newly completed Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine underground parking garage, building the capacity for a regional adoption of zero-emitting cars. Charging stations are planned for three (3) Penn garages: 7 (near Penn Museum); 30 (38th & Walnut); and 37 (34th & Ludlow). The installation is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2010. Six Penn parking lots provide reserved spaces for PhillyCarShare vehicles. The Division of Public Safety received a fall 2009 Green Fund grant to pilot the use of a high-efficiency electric vehicle to support new security patrols in Penn Park.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

As the first phase of a campus wide receptacle reorganization, in July of 2010, fifty-one single trash cans were removed from campus and replaced with sixteen “triplets” (paper, co-mingled plastic/glass/aluminum, and trash). The triplet bins have been demonstrated to reduce contamination of recycling to near zero levels by increasing the convenience, transparency, and clarity of the recycling process in public spaces. Stakeholders from Business Services, Purchasing, IT, Environmental Health and Radiation Safety and Facilities and Real Estate Services are working together to develop a comprehensive policy for e-waste at Penn. This policy will provide suggestions on reuse, resale, and recycling for departments needing to dispose of electronics. An audit and analysis of recycling receptacles throughout all eleven college houses and Sansom Place was carried out during the summer of 2010. Recommendations for changing the layout, signage, and type of bins throughout each house was developed in coordination with multiple university stakeholders: students, custodial services, and administrators. Sustainability staff in Facilities and Real Estate Services is working with school sustainability coordinators and Operations and Maintenance staff to significantly increase deskside recycling in offices throughout the University. Pilots of multiple deskside recycling arrangements were tested during the summer of 2010, and recommended options made to the Penn community on how to institute deskside recycling in their work space. Recycling was incorporated into the Penn Relays for the first time in April 2010 with 3.25 tons of recyclables being collected over the three-day event. A waste management specialist was hired to coordinate this effort and make recommendations on expanding this practice in future years. Working with a local construction waste management company, Penn salvages valuable materials from construction project sites, including carpet scraps, metals, ceiling tile, and drywall. When demolition of older buildings is necessary, deconstruction procedures salvage light fixtures, railings, carved stone, and windows for reuse on campus or sale. Starting in 2008, Penn Business Services began PennMOVES, a move-out recycling and re-use drive, with the goal of reducing waste and preventing usable items from going to landfills. In three years, approximately 100 tons of material has been diverted from the waste stream, and over $50K has been raise for the United Way. Through United Way, this money was donated to West Philadelphia charity agencies. In addition, canned and packaged goods donated collected through PennMOVES were donated to the People’s Emergency Center, and all items remaining after the sale were collected by Goodwill for sale in their own facilities to generate additional income to support their social work efforts. Penn Facilities and Real Estate Services has installed BigBelly solar compactors at 10 high-traffic locations on Walnut and Spruce Streets in 2009, to provide the Penn community with public recycling bins along the campus perimeter and reduce trash pick-ups and utility vehicle emissions. The solar panels on top of the unit powers the compaction mechanism, providing each BigBelly with the capacity to hold up to four times as much trash as a regular trash can, eliminating the need for Facilities crews to make three or four trips a day to empty overflowing bins. Penn Dining sells reusable tote bags and reusable water bottles in the retail dining locations. Penn Dining Services has also gone tray-less in residential dining halls; reducing food waste and conserving washing water and energy. Tray-less dining also reduces the use of chemicals that are found in detergents, and rinsing and drying agents needed to wash trays. Other waste management initiatives at Penn’s dining facilities include eliminating the use of plastic bags for to-go meals, introducing compostable takeout containers, and recycling used cooking oil. Bon Appétit at Penn Dining now composts food waste from all campus dining halls, an initiative that will divert an estimated 400 tons of food scraps from landfills annually. Students living in Mayer Hall received a 2009 Green Fund grant to start a composting program in their college house in the Fall 2010 semester. Annenberg Public Policy Center was also granted funding this year through the University’s Green Fund to develop a composting system for all the staff working inside their building. Finished compost is used for fertilizing plants both inside and outside the building.

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

The 2010-11 academic year has been named the Year of Water by the Office of the Provost. Throughout the year, interdisciplinary lectures, conferences, discussions, tours and exhibits will focus around the theme of water. In partnership with the Year of Water, the annual Penn Reading Project (a reading assignment for incoming freshmen and series of orientation activities) is The Big Necessity: The Unmentionable World of Human Waste and Why It Matters by Rose George. The Penn Reading Project activities have been coordinated with the Year of Water programming, and included a lecture to all freshmen by Ms. George, a Penn Alum and scholar. The Year of Water Grants Program will offer members of the Penn community grants up to $750 for water-related projects – conservation, education, efficiency, and awareness. Several campus offices, including Facilities and Real Estate Services and the School of Medicine have Quench machines, UV filtered water dispenser. These machines reduce departmental and staff purchases of bottled water. Mugs and glasses are provided in these workspaces to promote usage. Penn Park and Shoemaker Green will both have a large stormwater cistern installed underground to capture the first inch of rain water. In addition, the Shoemaker Green project is incorporating the capability to absorb and reuse runoff from adjacent buildings and properties, to provide improved stormwater management for the adjacent areas. The School of Veterinary Medicine received a Spring 2010 Green Fund grant to install a stormwater capture cistern below their interior courtyard. The Philadelphia Water Department coordinated with the Penn Facilities Team to develop a campus-wide stormwater management plan. The 3700 block of Woodland Walk was renovated in 2010 to incorporate drainage swales so that the runoff from the entire walkway is removed from the city’s combined sewer and stormwater system.

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name: Green Campus Partnership

Year created: 2007

Description: The Green Campus Partnership is Penn’s umbrella organization to address environmental sustainability planning and policy development and to coordinate programs and initiatives for a more sustainable campus. The Green Campus Partnership includes Facilities and Real Estate Services, Business Services, the Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee (ESAC) as well as faculty and student groups. This umbrella group coordinates the activities of over 25 full-time professionals across the University whose responsibilities include sustainability activities, policies, and actions. Full-time staff who work on sustainability issues include: • Engineers and supervisors in Operations and Maintenance; • Business Service Directors (dining, transportation, and purchasing); • Communication specialists (President’s office, Publications, Admissions, Penn Communications); and • Faculty from the School of Design and the Department of Earth and Environmental Science. Within Facilities and Real Estate Services, the Sustainability Team includes the Environmental Sustainability Coordinator, Sustainability Strategic Planning Associate, two Sustainability Outreach Associates, Existing Building, Operations, and Maintenance & Life Cycle Costing Intern, Sustainable Transportation Intern, and two Student Residence Eco-Rep Interns.

Number of staff in office (in FTE):

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title: Environmental Sustainability Coordinator

Department: Facilities and Real Estate Services

Time worked (in FTE): 1

Job description: Coordinate and direct work of the Green Campus Partnership and the Facilities and Real Estate Sustainability Team, author reports and updates, present Penn’s sustainability plan to internal and external audiences, and coordinate responses to outside organizations and request for information.

 

 12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managingsustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Sustainability Strategic Planning Associate

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

1

 

Track campus-wide sustainability metrics for energy use, high-performance buildings, transportation, waste minimization, academics and communications. Manage the Penn Green Fund.

Sustainability Outreach Associate (1)

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

1

 

Manages Penn’s Eco-Reps program throughout College House and Greek community. Includes recruitment of students, development of organizational structure and mission, development/ management of activities and campaigns, running weekly and monthly program meetings, communicating regularly with Eco-Reps, and managing program budget. Serves as primary liaison between FRES’ sustainability staff and Penn’s student body. Answering queries on Penn sustainability initiatives to interested students.

Sustainability Outreach Associate (2)

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

1

 

Develops and implements Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps and education and behavior change campaigns. This consultant works closely with Schools and Centers across the University, under the direction of the Environmental Sustainability Coordinator.

Communications Coordinator

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

.5

 

Provides oversight and management of communication, publicity, and educational outreach for Penn’s Green Campus Partnership within the Division of Facilities and Real Estate Services (FRES). Position is responsible for the development and implementation of communication materials for the Green Campus Partnership and will assist with the development of sustainability projects within FRES.

Director of Dining

 

Division of Business Services

 

.25

 

 

Oversees all of Dining Services, dining contracts, composting program. Position is responsible for supporting the use of sustainable food throughout campus dining locations.

Director of Communications & External Relations

 

Division of Business Services

 

.2

 

Provides oversight and management of communication, publicity, and educational outreach for Business Services Division’s (BSD) sustainability initiatives related to transportation and purchasing.

Director of Marketing

 

Division of Business Services

 

.2

 

Position is responsible for the development and implementation of communication materials for the sustainability initiatives and will assist with the development of sustainability projects within BSD.

Director of Purchasing, Penn Purchasing Services

 

Division of Business Services

 

.35

 

Responsible for the creation and implementation of sustainable purchasing frameworks for the University.

Director of External Affairs

 

Office of the Executive Vice President

 

.15

 

Serves as the Communications Subcommittee Chair on the Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee. Coordinates sustainability related messages throughout the University along with uniform branding and messaging related to the Green Campus Partnership.

Interiors Project Manager

 

School of Arts and Sciences Facilities Planning and Operations

 

.5

 

Oversees the management of sustainable renovations and sustainable purchasing practices; conducts outreach within the school about sustainability initiatives.

Associate Director - Sustainability and Leadership

 

The Wharton School

 

.5

 

Oversees the management of sustainable building operations, renovations, and purchasing practices; conducts outreach within the school about sustainability initiatives.

Associate Director Space Planning & Operations

 

School of Medicine

 

5(estimated)

 

Oversees the management of sustainable renovations and sustainable purchasing practices; conducts outreach within the school about sustainability initiatives.

Building Interiors Coordinator, Operational Services

 

School of Engineering

 

5(estimated)

 

Oversees the management of sustainable renovations and sustainable purchasing practices; conducts outreach within the school about sustainability initiatives

Energy Planning Associate

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

.5

 

Conducts greenhouse gas and carbon emissions inventories for the University; contributes to the creation of the Energy Reduction Fund.

University Architect

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

.25

 

Oversees the Sustainability Team within Facilities and Real Estate Services. Ensures that Penn’s urban form incorporates green building methods and other sustainability practices.

University Landscape Architect

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

.5

 

Oversees the implementation of sustainable landscape protocols throughout campus.

Principal Planning Engineer

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services

 

.25

 

Oversees the Energy Reduction Fund and Facilities Renewable Fund. Manages re-commissioning work and scheduling.

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

www.upenn.edu/sustainability

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Cleaning products

 

[   ]

 

[X]

Computers/electronics

 

[X]

 

[   ]

Lighting

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Office supplies

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Paper products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[  ]

 

[X]


Other description: Penn's Green Purchasing Initiative encourages the purchase of products with a reduced or minimal environmental impact as compared to similar products/services. Purchasing Services supports the purchase of recycled content, environmentally preferable and bio-based products through the inclusion of environmentally friendly products in preferred contract supplier online product catalogs in the Penn Marketplace. Penn Purchasing website has a Green Purchasing section that lets the Penn Community know how to purchase environmentally friendly products. Staff can easily identify green items in the Penn Marketplace by looking for the specific icon immediately following the item description which designate that these are environmentally preferred products. As part of this initiative, Purchasing Services is also committed to educating faculty, staff and students about Green Purchasing. The Annual Penn Marketplace Supplier Show highlights the environmentally friendly products and services. The show enables over 700 faculty and staff to meet the University supplier representatives and learn more about “green” product and service offerings.

 

 

 15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[  ]

 

Appliances

 

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Building products

 

 

[  ]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Heating and cooling

 

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Lighting and fans

 

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Plumbing

 

 

 

 

Additional comments: Penn cannot provide the percentage of all appliances, but does exclusively purchase appliances and computers/electronics that are ENERGY STAR rated.

 

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

 

 

 

Facial tissues

 

 

 

 

Napkins

 

 

 

 

Notepads

 

 

 

 

Office paper

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Paper towels

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additional comments: When the original SEI 2011 survey was circulated to our Purchasing Department, this question was phrased differently. We do not have the time now to gather this new information, but we will plan ahead for next year's survey. Listed below is the information originally gathered for this question. 26.8% of cut-sheet paper is post-consumer recycled content. The percentage is not tracked for chlorine-free processing but some of the portion purchased is chlorine-free. 69.9% percent of overall cut-sheet paper purchases is SFI certified (For an explanation of the difference between SEI and FSC see: http://www.yale.edu/forestcertification/pdfs/auditprograms.pdf

 

 

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

All

 

100

 

Desktop computers

Product 2

 

Some

 

98

 

Laptops/ notebooks

Product 3

 

All

1

100

 

Monitors (LCD)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Alumni green fund

 

While Penn does not have an explicit Alumni Green Fund, alumni who are interested in donating funds to environmental projects on campus can donate to specific development projects through the department of Development and Alumni Relations. In recent years, several “class gift” donations have explicitly been put towards sustainable landscape and garden projects, including components of the new 24-acre Penn Park.

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

The Capital Budget funds the construction of all new buildings which, as outlined in Penn’s Climate Action Plan, must be certified to LEED Silver certification or higher.

[  ]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects    

 

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

The Operating Budget funds Recyclemania, the Green Campus Partnership staff salaries, the Energy Reduction Fund, upgrades to the distributed campus infrastructure, and re-commissioning of campus buildings.

[X]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

The Green Fund is a competitively awarded grant designed to seed innovative ideas by faculty, students and staff one-time grants of as much as $50,000. Projects are selected by a review board composed of students, faculty and staff that meets once a semester to review project submittals. Initiatives such as education and awareness-building that do not have a defined return on investment are required to repay the loan fund. Capital or operational projects that have a determined repayment will repay the Green Fund. A total of 18 projects have been awarded since fall 2010. Projects that have received Green Fund financing range from a small-scale College House composting program to the installation of energy efficient lighting for an entire school. The Energy Reduction Fund (ERF) is a centralized program for energy saving projects and retrofits for campus buildings. The ERF combines maintenance renovations with new capital projects, and includes mechanisms to track and monitor energy performance. The ERF is intended to be a self-sustaining program funded through the utilities budget, and employs a point scoring system to prioritize projects.

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

 

[  ]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps: The Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps program is meant for any Penn faculty or staff member looking to reduce the environmental footprint of his or her office through improved environmental awareness and behavior change. Eco-Reps participate in monthly meetings to share best sustainable practices between departments, as well as brief trainings by Penn’s sustainability team on green topics. Eco-Reps take what they learn back to their office to share with others and implement sustainable changes.

[  ]

 

Green office certification program

 

 

[X]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps provide tips on environmental awareness to their offices and departments, and receive an update e-mail monthly from the Eco-Reps Outreach Coordinator on best practices and greening strategies. Penn’s bi-monthly e-newsletter On College Green provides facts about how members of the Penn community can make sustainable behavior change choices. The University’s Green Campus Partnership website provides recycling posters for download for College Houses, classrooms, and offices. The website also contains numerous facts and tips on energy conservation, recycling, green building, and transportation.

[X]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

The Sustainability Team worked with Human Resources to incorporate sustainability into the topics covered in new staff orientation.

[X]

 

Other

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services and Business Services are working together this summer to develop green catering guidelines for the campus community.


Back to top

 

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[  ]In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date         

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In progress. At the time of this survey, the fiscal year just ended.

 

 

2008

 

July 1, 2008

 

314,771 MTCDE

 

361,776 MTCDE

 

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/Climate%20Action%20Plan%20Summary%209-15%20.pdf

 

Published in Penn’s Climate Action Plan

2007

 

July 1, 2007

 

309,117 MTCDE

 

355,800 MTCDE

 

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/Climate%20Action%20Plan%20Summary%209-15%20.pdf

 

Published in Penn’s Climate Action Plan

2006

 

July 1, 2006

 

311,198 MTCDE

 

362,143 MTCDE

 

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/Climate%20Action%20Plan%20Summary%209-15%20.pdf

 

Published in Penn’s Climate Action Plan

2005

 

July 1, 2005

 

302,929 MTCDE

 

351,150 MTCDE

 

 

 

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage): 23% decrease

Baseline year:   2007

Baseline emissions level:  362,143 MTCDE (Scope 1,2,3)

Target year: 2014

 

Additional comments:   In the Climate Action Plan, Penn committed to two GHG emissions reductions. The first target is a 5% decrease in GHG emissions from the 2007 baseline by fiscal year 2010. The second target is a 23% decrease from the 2007 baseline by fiscal year 2014.

 

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced: 1.75%

Baseline year: 2007

Baseline emissions level: 362000 MTCDE

Year achieved: 2008

 

Additional comments: The baseline and reduction include Scope 1 & 2 absolute emissions (not growth-adjusted) for both campuses. During this time, floor space increased by 20%.

 

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

Carbon inventory not yet complete

2008:

 

26.8

2007:

 

26.3

2006:

 

27.3

2005:

 

26.7


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

Not yet complete

2008:

 

12.79

2007:

 

12.64

2006:

 

15.21

2005:

 

14.65

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units) .

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
  1,643,970,000,000 kbtu     
Gross square feet of building space:   11,340,689 sq ft

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption: 1,607,320,000,000 ktbu

Gross square feet of building space :  11,738,839 sq ft

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[  ]    Cogeneration

[X ]    Temperature setbacks

[X ]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

0

[X]

 

Economizers

 

60

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

75

[X]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

5

[X]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

20

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

.5

[X]

 

Lighting sensors

 

15

[X]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

10

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

95

[X]

 

Metering—steam

 

10

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

10

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

30

[X]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

20

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

[X]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

95

[X]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

25

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

80

[X]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

.5

[X]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

Aircuity Systems 10%

 

Description:

 


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[X]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[  ]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[X]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[X]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[X]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[X]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[  ]

 

Other. Please describe:                                                

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

No

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[  ]

 

Biomass

 

 

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[  ]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[  ]

 

Photovoltaics

 

 

 

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

 

Other description: Penn is in the process of evaluating utility-scale solar power purchase agreement for rooftop photovoltaic of 1-2 megawatts


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

No

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems:

Total MBtus generated annually:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

 

Coal

 

13

 

Natural Gas

 

32

 

Nuclear

 

12

 

Petroleum

 

15

 

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

27

 

Other. Please specify:

 

 

 

Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid:


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards .

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase:   2010
Length of contract:   Penn is the number one wind REC purchaser among North American colleges and universities, with an annual purchase of 200,000 mW. Penn currently has several overlapping contracts for continued wind REC purchasing, the longest being a 10 year contract with Community Energy.
Average annual quantity (kWh):   45%
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents:  

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

0

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

Coal

 

8

Geothermal

 

Natural gas

 

46

Petroleum

 

22

Other. Please specify: wind- 16%, nuclear 7%

 

     

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FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey .

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users:  pending calculation
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):   pending calculation

 

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
 pending calculation
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):  pending calculation

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[X]

 

Glass

[  ]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[X]

 

Other. Please list:     electronic waste- see question 37

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

24%

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[X]

 

[X]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[X]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[X]

 

[X]

Weight Numbers (10/1/09 – 3/31/10) Monitors—13,710 lbs. Computers—31,037 lbs. Printers—4,600 lbs. Miscellaneous (Mice, Keyboards, etc.)—6,866 lbs Students can recycle cell phones, batteries, and mercury-containing bulbs in receptacles in the lobbies of all Penn’s dormitories. Electronics can be sent back to the manufacturer for recycling via the campus’ computer store, Computer Connection. Also, an e-waste recycling day was held during Recyclemania this year, which allowed all staff and students to bring e-waste for free recycling through the University’s e-waste recycling vendor, Elemental, Inc. We anticipate holding this same day next year during Recyclemania.



If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

Penn’s E-Waste Recycler: Elemental, Inc. Elemental, Inc. is fully licensed and permitted by the PA Department of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Elemental is a woman-owned, Subchapter-S corporation, and a partner in EPA’s Region 3 eCycle program. Elemental ensures that all materials received are processed and recycled, destroyed or displaced, in an environmentally-correct manner that is in accordance with all local, state and federal regulations.

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[X]  

 

Academic buildings

[X]  

 

Offices

[X]  

 

Outdoors

[X]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

Mayer Hall, a Penn dormitory, was funded through the University’s Green Fund to develop a composting system for all the students and staff inside the building. The building will begin composting food waste outdoors in tumblers beginning in September. Annenberg Public Policy Center was funded this year through the University’s Green Fund to develop a worm composting system for all the staff working inside their building. Finished compost is used for fertilizing plants both inside and outside the building. Huntsman Hall, the main building for Penn’s Wharton Business School, is composting all waste paper towels in all restrooms. Negotiations with Penn’s composting hauler, Waste Management, were completed in the summer of 2010 to collect all the paper waste from bathrooms for composting at the Wilmington Organic Recycling Center. Additionally, Penn's Facilities and Real Estate Services partnered with local businesses to create the Moravian Street Recycling and Composting Center. At this center, waste from the adjacent restaurants and offices is captured and sorted, including food waste, fryer grease, and recyclables. This project was supported by a grant from the PA Dept. of Environmental Protection. At the Morris Arboretum, Penn’s arboretum located approximately eight miles from the main campus, a composting and landscape waste yard accepts yard waste and leaves from the entire neighboring municipality of Springfield Township, allowing residents free access to compost and mulch at any time. Penn’s remote 700-acre large animal facility, the New Bolton Center, recycles 100% of animal waste as fertilizer on pasture fields.

 

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

The entire Facilities and Real Estate Services and Purchasing departments have both standardized double-sided printing in their offices in 2009. The entire Wharton Business School has also standardized double-sided printing. The Penn Law School application process went paperless in 2009. Penn’s central I.T. department has a “Green I.T.” suggestions website that includes tips on printing reduction including double-sided printing.

[X]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

During Move-in, the Green Campus Partnership distributes compact fluorescent light bulbs, and recycles boxes on behalf of the student residents.

[X]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

Penn MOVES collects items left behind by University of Pennsylvania students when they leave campus each spring, diverting this waste from landfills, and selling it to community residents for reuse. In May 2010, over 90,000 pounds of items were collected and $22,000 was raised and donated to United Way for distribution to West Philadelphia charities. In addition, canned and packaged food collected through PennMOVES was donated to the People’s Emergency Center. Any remaining items from the sale were donated to Goodwill Industries.

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs     

 

A website for exchanging unwanted items among Penn departments launched in 2010, and is available to the entire Penn staff and faculty community. A Penn-specific exchange website is available for buying, selling, and trading personal items throughout the Penn community.

[X]  

 

Other

 

Several campus offices, including Facilities and Real Estate Services and the School of Medicine have Quench machines, UV filtered water dispenser. These machines reduce departmental and staff purchases of bottled water. Mugs and glasses are provided in these workspaces to promote usage.


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GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/environment.html Penn’s Climate Action Plan puts forth goals to create and maintain a sustainable campus by increasing green space, decreasing building energy consumption, and increasing education and awareness of sustainable design. The Physical Environment section of the plan outlines the following specific strategies to achieve these goals: • Adopting LEED Silver Certification, with Penn-specific goals, as a minimum standard for new construction and major renovations; • Providing training to Penn staff on sustainable design and construction practices; and • Implementing increasingly sustainable protocols for site planning and landscape maintenance. Consistent with the Physical Environment recommendations of the Climate Action Plan, all new buildings currently under design are registered with the US Green Building Council, and are targeting LEED Silver rating or higher. Project budgets range from about $20M to $300M, with a total aggregate construction value of over $1 billion. For several recent projects on campus, Penn’s TC Chan Research Center, located within the School of Design and staffed by Penn faculty and graduate students, has been employed as consultants to provide energy and fluid dynamic modeling to fine-tune building designs. The goal is to provide the most comfortable, healthy, day lit lecture halls, labs, classrooms, and offices possible for teaching, research, and learning. The $22+M annual budget for deferred maintenance is being prioritized to implement energy saving projects to provide the greatest return on investment. This investment in Penn’s existing building stock will serve to preserve the unique character of Penn’s historic buildings for another generation of users. As noted by Penn’s University Architect, “The greenest building is one you don’t have to build.” Finally, for Penn’s off-campus development projects, including a new office tower, parking garage and residences at the periphery of campus, the University’s Real Estate Department is providing guidelines for sustainable design. The office tower project, with a construction value of over $200M, will be developed as a LEED Silver project, with an extensive green roof above a parking garage.

 


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings: 5

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

   740000

 

Perelman Center for Advanced Medicine, Music Building*, Weiss Pavillion*, Translational Research Center*(*380,000 of which is still pending certification)

Silver-level

 

 

 

Gold-level

 

21000

 

Morris Arboretum Horticulture Center* (still pending certification)

Platinum-level   

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria: 1

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

 

 

 

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

52800

 

Annenberg Public Policy Center

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

   

 

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

   

 

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:  
0
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:
 
Total number of buildings:
  0   
Combined gross square footage: 

Building names:  

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

75%

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   10


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use       

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

Weiss Pavilion

 

22,500 sq. ft

 

Exterior Stadium Arcade/Parking

 

varsity weight room, recreation fitness center, and retail

 

Targeting Silver or Gold LEED standard

Fiji Fraternity Building

 

6,000 sq. ft

 

Office space

 

Student Residences and social space

 

Received a Penn Green Fund grant for sustainable renovations and energy efficiency

Penn Park

 

1,045,440 sq. ft

 

Parking lot

 

Park, recreation fields, bike paths, and tennis courts

 

Sustainable Landscape plan is being implemented during construction in 2010-2011

Charles Addams Hall

 

44, 200 sq. ft

 

Offices and Faculty Club

 

Undergraduate Fine Arts studio building

 

Received a Penn Green Fund grant for sustainable renovations and energy efficiency

Left Bank

 

673,000 sq. ft

 

Abandoned factory building

 

Facilities and Real Estate Services department, offices, daycare center, workshops, and apartments

 

Penn third-party real estate development project, currently houses Penn’s Facilities & Real Estate Services offices, the Department of Environmental Health and Radiation Safety, and Penn Children’s Center in the (otherwise unused) lower level.

World Café Live

 

43,750 sq. ft

 

Abandoned factory building

 

Theater, restaurant, concert hall

 

Designed by Meyer Associates, a leading green architecture and design firm in Philadelphia

Translational Research Facility Building

 

129,418 sq. ft

 

 

Abandoned factory building

 

Biomedical research building

 

Provides accommodation for Penn biomedical research adjacent to campus

Carriage House

 

7,717 sq. ft

 

Storage building

 

LGBT student life center

 

1850s-era building

Parent Infant Center

 

 

Abandoned divinity school

 

Daycare and preschool

 

Penn Press

 

13,600 sq. ft

 

Radio station

 

Publishing Center

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):   23,000 (estimated)

Square footage:   11 million (estimated)

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 24,599

Square footage: 14 million

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Penn is in the process of creating a centralized mechanism to propose energy saving projects and retrofits for campus buildings called the ERF (Energy Reduction Fund). The ERF combines Facilities Renewal Fund energy related items, energy savings ideas from various sources, problems identified during energy audits which are too large to be considered recommissioning, spending to support tracking and monitoring of usage such as metering, and infrastructural energy reduction initiatives. The ERF is a self-sustaining program which is funded through utilities reserves. The ERF utilizes a point scoring system to select each project based on various criteria to determine which projects are of a higher priority to be completed, and to strike a balance between utility infrastructure projects and energy/carbon reduction projects. The $22+M annual budget for deferred maintenance is being prioritized to implement energy saving projects to provide the greatest return on investment. This investment in Penn’s existing building stock will serve to preserve the unique character of Penn’s historic buildings for another generation of users.

 


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings:  

Combined gross square footage: 
Building names:

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: 1 (pending performance period evaluation)
Combined gross square footage:   320,000
Building names: Huntsman Hall

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members) .

No

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
 
Water consumed (gallons):  

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
 

Water consumed (gallons):  

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[X]  

 

Building water metering

 

100

[X]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

5

[   ]  

 

Gray water systems

 

[X]  

 

Laundry technology

 

95

[X]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

100

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

90

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

100

[X]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

10

[X]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

(prohibited by Philadelphia Plumbing Code)

[X]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

10

[X]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

8

[   ]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description:  

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[X]  

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[X]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Penn Park and Shoemaker Green will both have a large stormwater cistern installed underground to capture the first inch of rain water. In addition, the Shoemaker Green project is incorporating the capability to absorb and reuse runoff from adjacent buildings and properties, to provide improved stormwater management for the adjacent areas. The School of Veterinary Medicine received a Spring 2010 Green Fund grant to install a stormwater capture cistern below their interior courtyard. The Philadelphia Water Department coordinated with the Penn Facilities Team to develop a campus-wide stormwater management plan. The 3700 block of Woodland Walk was renovated in 2010 to incorporate drainage swales so that the runoff from the entire walkway is removed from the city’s combined sewer and stormwater system.

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy) . If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


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STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College .

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

Biosphere

 

Building

 

50

 

Biosphere Program is all about how people interact with the world around them. Residents have opportunities, ranging from outdoor recreation to exploring sustainability topics on Penn’s campus and throughout the city of Philadelphia. Residents establish social and academic activities, such as museum trips, cook-outs, canoeing and camping outings, Earth Day fundraisers, and a host of faculty discussions, as well as outdoor vegetable gardening in the King’s Court / English College House courtyard.

Eco-Reps

 

Building

 

Estimated 100 Eco-Reps will participate in the upcoming 2010-2011 academic year

 

The College House Eco-Reps program is an environmental leadership program, open to all Penn College House residents, that focuses on raising awareness of environmental issues and encouraging sustainable practices on Penn's campus. Students can apply to serve as Eco-Reps in all college houses on campus. In 2010/2011, six to ten students per college house serve as Eco-Reps. Eco-Reps work to develop educational events, activities, and campaigns aimed at supporting the University’s environmental goals and Climate Action Plan. Penn’s program is positioned within the college house on-campus residential system, enabling any student to take on environmental sustainability initiatives in their residence.

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[X]      

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[X]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[X]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[  ]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe: Penn Sustainability: Green Campus Partnership hosted a pro-seminar during the 2010 New Student Orientation. In this pro-seminar, the Environmental Sustainability coordinator will promote the goals of the University’s Climate Action Plan and how students can get involved in sustainability on campus. Guest speakers will include the Director of the Philadelphia Watersheds Office and the former Sustainability Director of the City of Philadelphia, both current Penn faculty. Both speakers will discuss their experience as environmental leaders in Philadelphia and their courses this year at Penn. The seminar will also provide students with information about student groups that work on sustainability issues. For the first time this year, Resident Assistants within College House residences will be incorporating sustainability into the themes they present to students at the beginning of the year.

 

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

45 estimated

 

20

Unpaid positions

 

150 estimated

 

20


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/eco-reps/college-house.html and http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/eco-reps/greek.html  

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

0

 

0

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

0

 

0

Uncompensated positions.

 

100 estimated

 

10

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, three or more competitions.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: Power Down Challenge

Year Initiated: Winter 2009

Website:  http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/powerdown.html

 

Frequency that competition is run:   Once each semester

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

 

[X]

 

Other

 

Recognition in the Penn Sustainability Website and newsletter

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[X]

 

Energy conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:   Results indicate that Penn reduced electricity usage by nearly 13 megawatt hours during the one hour-long Power Down Challenge. This is equivalent to approximately a 21% reduction in the typical electrical load on campus at this time or the estimated hourly electricity use of 10,000 households, which would represent nearly 60 percent of the homes in University City.

 

 

Lasting effects of competition:   The University is pleased to report that the June 17, 2010 Power Down Challenge exceeded our high expectations. Conducted by the Green Campus Partnership, in collaboration with Facilities and Real Estate Services, this Challenge was held in cooperation with the regional electric grid operator PJM, which conducts an annual test of its emergency electricity load shedding system. When electricity use is very high, especially on hot, humid, summer afternoons, the grid operator asks large consumers of power such as Penn to reduce electricity consumption, ensuring that enough electricity is available to meet demand in the region and helping to avoid the need to turn on older, inefficient power plants. Since the Power Down Challenge on June 17, 2010, Penn has been called up two times to by our local grid operator to ask us to shed some of our electricity load. Penn has been able to reach out to the June 17th participants and ask them to again participate in reducing their energy usage.

 

Additional Information:   The Power Down Challenge was also an opportunity to showcase the value of the Staff and Faculty Eco-Reps across campus. This group of more than 100 volunteers inspired the Penn community to participate in, and communicate about, the University's conservation efforts. Some offices powered down all devices not in use, and some held meetings outside, while others hosted group discussions on sustainability. Many individuals and departments have already begun re-examining opportunities for reducing their electricity usage after participating in the Challenge, and in turn have played a key role in generating enthusiasm and awareness for sustainable energy practices across the campus.

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:   Recyclemania

Year Initiated:   Spring 2007

Website:   http://www.upenn.edu/sustainability/recyclemania.html

 

Frequency that competition is run:  Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

 

[  ]

 

Faculty

 

[X]

 

Staff

 

[X]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[X]

 

Faculty

[X]

 

Staff

[X]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

Personal recycling bin giveaways, cups made from recycled materials, magnets

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation

 

[X]

 

Waste reduction

 

To raise awareness, increase the amount of material that is recycled, and to increase the reduction of waste.

[  ]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  
Penn’s cumulative recycling rate from the competition was 23.53%. Penn placed 3rd in the “least waste per person” category among the Ivy League, with 66.49 cumulative pounds of waste per person


Lasting effects of competition:  
Since the Spring Recyclemania competition, Penn’s recycling rate has continued to increase. Penn’s current recycling rate is 24%. Recycling at basketball games and during the Penn Relays, both new recycling initiatives in 2010 that grew out of the Recyclemania competition diverted over four tons of waste from landfills in 2010.


Additional Information:  

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:  Penn Energy Showdown

Year Initiated:  Spring 2010

Website:   http://www.facebook.com/#!/group.php?gid=110725688952897&ref=search

 

Frequency that competition is run:   Once each semester

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

   

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

Waterbottles, t-shirts, restaurant gift certificates, magnets

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  
The winning college house reduced their energy consumption by 6.71%.


Lasting effects of competition:  
Students were energized from the Penn Energy Showdown. Various engagement methods were used to galvanize support and participation in the showdown. Students were asked to take an energy pledge as part of the competition. The Spring 2010 competition laid substantive groundwork for the Fall 2010 and Spring 2011 Showdowns. Students enthusiasm is high

Additional Information:  

The Penn Energy Showdown was funded by a Fall 2009 Penn Green Fund grant. The Penn Green Fund seeds innovative, environmental leadership projects.

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

Penn Environmental Group

 

The University of Pennsylvania Environmental Group is a student run group aiming to increase campus awareness of global environmental issues across the Penn community and throughout the world. The Group seeks to incorporate ideals from a diverse community, and expose the campus, community and the world at large to an expanded knowledge of environmental issues.

 

http://www.dolphin.upenn.edu/pennenv/

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Garden

 

Penn Green Fund financed the establishment of the Penn Garden in the Fall 2010 semester. The Penn Garden is a demonstration vegetable garden and urban agriculture project on Penn’s campus. The Penn Garden doesn’t use any artificial chemicals or fertilizers.

 

http://thepenngarden.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Urban Nutrition Initiative

 

The Agatston Urban Nutrition Initiative (AUNI) is a university-community partnership based at the University of Pennsylvania that engages K-16+ learners in an active, real-world problem-solving curriculum that strives to improve community nutrition and wellness. UNI programs fall into three general categories: increasing food and nutrition knowledge, increasing the supply of healthy foods, and encouraging and supporting active lifestyles.

 

http://www.urbannutrition.org/

 

 

 

 

 

Penn EPED (Environmental Planning and Ecological Design)

 

EPED is a student-run group of graduate students in the areas of architecture, landscape architecture, city planning, and historic preservation. Its mission is the ongoing engagement of the campus student body, faculty, and maintenance staff on the topic of sustainability in design. Issues and events includes design competitions for improving waste and recycling, film screenings, community engagement activities (tree planting, urban farms visits), discussions with local experts, and panels with PennDesign professors regarding their professional experience and advice for students interested in enrolling in the School’s various sustainability-focused programs.

 

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=67033013466

 

 

 

 

 

FarmEcology

 

Founded as an outgrowth of an Academically Based Community Service (ABCS) class, FarmEcology is a student-initiated endeavor that is raising awareness and educating Penn's campus about the benefits of local foods. Initial partnership with PennDining resulted in a program to bring local, fresh food into Penn’s Dining facilities on a regular basis, and also in the on-campus Lancaster County farmer’s market on campus once-a week. Penn Dining Dollars are accepted as payment at the farmer’s market.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Penn Green

 

With the enormous growth of the environmental movement on Penn's campus in the past few years, an environmentally-themed pre-orientation pilot program was created in 2008. The mission of the PennGreen program is to provide incoming freshmen with an environmental introduction to Penn and the City of Philadelphia, offering them a chance to form relationships with environmentally-minded peers. Along with upperclassmen, participants in this program engage in a number of activities. They meet faculty and senior administrators, learn about campus recycling and Penn building projects that are designed to meet the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standards, volunteer at local urban farms, partake in and learn about how the community participates in the sustainable food and living movement, and take an ecological river tour.

 

http://www.vpul.upenn.edu/osl/preprog/pgdesc.html

 

 

 

 

 

CommuniTech

 

CommuniTech is a student organization in the School of Engineering & Applied Sciences that aims to assist neighborhoods in need by supplying them with computers and teaching technology skills to their residents. Their efforts stem from the recognition that the computer has become a central facet of everyday life in this rapidly advancing age of information technology.

 

http://fling.seas.upenn.edu/~ctech/cgi-bin/index.php

 

 

 

 

 

The Undergraduate Assembly

 

The Undergraduate Assembly (UA) is an elected body consisting of thirty-three undergraduate students selected by their respective schools. It is charged with representing undergraduate interests to the administration, faculty, and all other constituent groups at Penn. The UA Facilities and Campus Planning Committee works on sustainability initiatives such as off campus recycling and socially responsible investing.

 

http://pennua.org/

 

 

 

 

 

The Graduate and Professional Student Assembly (GAPSA)

 

The Graduate and Professional Student Assembly (GAPSA) is the University-wide government for graduate and professional students, interacting regularly with the President, Provost, Board of Trustees, and other University officials. GAPSA is governed by elected representatives from each of Penn's twelve schools and a student executive board. GAPSA also works with the student governments of individual schools and with other specialized student governments at Penn. GAPSA representatives are part of Penn's Environmental Sustainability Advisory Committee (ESAC).

 

http://www.gapsa.upenn.edu/

 

 

 

 

 

Wharton Undergraduate Sustainability Association

 

Undergraduate sustainability group at Wharton. Philadelphia Global Sustainability Association of Business Students and the Wharton Undergraduate Sustainability Association organized the Philadelphia International Sustainability Conference 2009. One of the central goals of the Wharton Undergraduate Sustainability Association is to “promote increased awareness of the crucial links between business and sustainability among Wharton students and the Penn student body as a whole.”

 

http://www.whartonsustainability.com/

 

 

 

 

 

SAS Sustainability Advisory Board

 

Student advisory board for the School of Arts and Sciences. The Board holds townhalls and general body meetings to ensure that the student voice is represented in SAS’ sustainability initiatives.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Green Acorn

 

“The Green Acorn Business Certification Program is an initiative started by the Penn Environmental Group (PEG) that creates a streamlined certification process for businesses that use green practices. The aim of the program is encourage local businesses to incorporate sustainability into their business model and for students to be able to make their purchases from the best businesses around Penn's campus. To achieve this aim, free advertising and other promotions are awarded to certified businesses and window decals are placed on storefronts to help students identify certified businesses. As more businesses integrate sustainability into their operations, Philadelphia will benefit from lowered energy and water use, reduced waste, increased reuse and recycling of materials, improved air quality, and increased environmental awareness. As more students make their purchases from 'green' businesses, it will encourage more businesses to become 'green' or else be left behind.” (From the Green Acorn facebook page)

 

http://www.facebook.com/posted.php?id=279730543675#!/pages/Green-Acorn/279730543675

 

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TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

353

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[X]  

 

100 percent electric

 

6

[   ]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

[   ]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

(Biofuel not commercially available within three miles of Penn)

 

[  ]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

(Biofuel not commercially available within three miles of Penn)

[X]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

                     3

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

 

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe:

2 Natural gas buses for campus shuttles

 

 


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

90

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

5

Carpool/vanpool

 

1

Public transit

 

24

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

15

Walking

 

55

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

85

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

3

Carpool/vanpool

 

1

Public transit

 

32

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

59

Walking

 

5

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[  ] No

[X] Yes, to faculty and staff

[X] Yes, to students

 

Description:  


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Penn has partnered with a service called AlterNetRides to assist faculty, staff and students who are interested in joining a car pool. The system allows users to connect with other interested members of the Penn community. The Clean Air Council's Philadelphia Mobility Alternatives Program offers a number of programs for people who want to share transportation. These include: § Share-A-Ride: The Share-A-Ride program is an easy and convenient way for employees to commute to work every day. Share-A-Ride matches employees that live near or around the same area, creating an easy commute alternative to the Single Occupancy Vehicle. If one of the matched employees cannot join the other for the ride home as well, this program even offers emergency rides home! § Emergency Ride Home is a program created for commuters who share their ride to work on a regular basis, in the event that a registered commuters' ride home is not available. In the event of unscheduled overtime, a personal emergency or illness, or if the ride home is not available for certain reasons, commuters are offered a free ride to their car or place of emergency. This offer is only available to employees who are registered with the Share-A-Ride program, or employees that are registered with an employer who participates in MAP.

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Business Services Department is currently investigating preferential parking for low-emitting vehicles. This program will likely launch in the Fall 2010 semester.

[X]  

 

Other

 

For faculty and staff, Penn, in partnership with the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), provides a 10 percent discount for the monthly regional rail, subway, trolley, and bus services, and pre-tax benefits for all public transit in Philadelphia and surrounding communities through SEPTA’s Commuter Pass Program and TransitCheks. Up to $115 worth of TransitCheks may be purchased through payroll deduction on a pre-tax basis. The following regional transit providers participate in the TransitChek program: SEPTA, Dart, NJ Transit, Amtrak, and PATCO. In the last year, commuters have also been get pre-tax dollars on a PATCO Freedom Pass, a program that has proven very popular. For full-time students, Penn in partnership with SEPTA, offers a semester-based transit pass, PennPass. Penn also holds an annual Commuter Fair where representatives from SEPTA, Amtrak, Philly CarShare, NJ Transit, the Greater Philadelphia Bicycle Coalition, PATCO, etc. come to campus to answer commuters’ questions and promote the use of public transportation. During New Student Orientation Penn also provides a Pro-Seminar on using public transportation and Penn’s on campus transportation.  


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students . Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]  

 

Carpool matching

 

 

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[  ]  

 

Preferential parking

 

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

No

 

  

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[X]  

 

Faculty

 

10

[X]  

 

Staff

 

10

[X]  

 

Students   

 

25% discount from NJ Transit. From SEPTA, the discount varies depending on the type of pass that a student purchases. The basic PennPass offers unlimited weekday travel with the City and unlimited weekend travel anywhere within the SEPTA regional transit system


[   ]  Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

Penn Transit Service is free to all members of the Penn Community (faculty, staff, students, guests) possessing a valid PennCard. Buses and Shuttles operate seven days a week between 4:45 pm and 3 a.m. (depending on routes) and service the Penn Campus and the surrounding neighborhoods. LUCY (Loop Through University City) is a SEPTA transit route funded by the University of Pennsylvania. The route loops through University City serving 30th Street Station, University of Pennsylvania, Drexel University, University City Science Center, University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Presbyterian Medical Center, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Children's Seashore House, and the Veterans Administration Medical Center. Employees and students of University of Pennsylvania, University of Pennsylvania Health System, and VA Medical Center need only valid institutional ID.

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  Penn Transit Service is free to all members of the Penn Community (faculty, staff, students, guests) possessing a valid PennCard. Buses and Shuttles operate seven days a week between 4:45 pm and 3 a.m. (depending on routes) and service the Penn Campus and the surrounding neighborhoods of Powelton Village, West Philadelphia and the western part of Center City.

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

No

 

 

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

The City of Philadelphia is cooperating with Penn in planning a city-wide bike sharing program, based on the successful model in Montreal. The intent is to deploy a complete 5000+ bicycle sharing program as an extension of the regional transit program. Penn is intentionally not pursuing a campus-only bike sharing program, as it would undermine and divert energy and resources from the City’s program. For more information on Philadelphia’s Bike Share program and Penn’s involvement, see http://www.bikesharephiladelphia.org/ To promote commuting to campus by bicycle, Penn Facilities is constructing the first of twelve bike corrals, located at the perimeter of campus, with security lighting and closed circuit security cameras, manned 24 hours a day by Penn’s Division of Public Safety. The initial corral will be completed by September 2010, adjacent to Penn’s main library.


Year created:  
Number of bikes available:  
Usage fee per hour:    
Usage fee per day:   

 

Annual membership fee for students:  

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: There is one for-profit and one not-for-profit bike repair shop on campus. Neighborhood Bike Works is Philadelphia’s only bicycle co-op, which provides inexpensive bikes, classes, and expert repair advice in an easily accessible location in the heart of campus. http://www.neighborhoodbikeworks.org/blog/about/ Trophy Bikes is a for-profit on-campus bike shop, which features commuter bikes.

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:  
Service fee:  
Description:  

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created:   2006
Total number of vehicles: 100+ (estimated)   
Number of hybrid vehicles:    50 (estimated)
Usage fee per hour:   varies see description
Usage fee per day:   varies see description


Annual membership fee for students:  varies see description

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  varies see description

Other annual membership fee:  varies see description

 

Description: Car Sharing: PhillyCarShare is the University’s preferred contract car sharing service provider that offers an affordable, convenient, and environmentally-friendly way to drive for Penn business requirements. Penn’s PhillyCarShare partnership is the largest university car-sharing program in North America. Penn also worked with PhillyCarShare to create special student rates for personal use and promotes them on campus. There are 22 car share locations on and around Penn’s Campus. PhillyCarShare is offering special contract rates to the University and Penn employees who use PhillyCarShare for official Penn business are covered under Penn’s insurance. The rates are listed below. University of Pennsylvania Rates Mileage: $0.20/mile up to 200 miles/day (overage is $0.25/mile) Weekdays - - $3.45/hour or $39/day for economy cars - $4.45/hour or $49/day for hybrid cars - $5.54/hour or $49/day for standard cars Weekends/Holidays - $4.90/hour or $39/day for economy cars - $5.90/hour or $69/day for hybrid cars - $7.90/hour or $79/day for standard Penn also participates in the Keystone Rate Plan: Mileage: 185 included per reservation (overage is $0.35/mile) Membership fee: $35/year Weekdays- - $7/hour for Standard cars - $8/hour for Specialty cars Weekends/Holidays - $9/hour for Standard cars - $11/hour for Specialty cars

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

Penn’s core campus was designed in 1976 by the then Dean of Penn’s Graduate School of Fine Arts, landscape architect Sir Peter Shepherd. This Landscape Architecture Master Plan (LAMP), executed in the late 1970s, closed several streets to traffic to create an entirely pedestrian campus core, and featured several on-campus portals to the underground trolley system with links to the regional rail infrastructure. During a period of extensive campus expansion from 1988 through the 1990’s Penn embarked on a follow-up to the LAMP under the direction of Laurie Olin, who is on Penn’s faculty and principle of The Olin Partnership. Known as the “Green Plan,” the Olin masterplan focused on concentrating student and faculty activities in the heart of campus, on limiting campus growth, emphasizing public transit, and relocating parking facilities to larger garages at the periphery of campus. These concepts are incorporated into the PennConnects campus master plan of 2005, which includes the 24-acre Penn Park expansion from a former US Post Office parking lot. The Penn Park development will be a pedestrian and bike-only precinct, fully accessible for wheelchair access In 2008, Penn completed a comprehensive, 20-year sustainable transportation plan for the University, carried out by Orth Rodgers Associates transportation consultants. The plan featured recommendations for strengthening alternative transportation strategies, including enhancing the physical condition of local subway and regional rail stops, expanded bicycle services and parking, and redesign of specific infrastructure to reduce congestion. Several projects will be executed during the 2010/2011 and 2011/2012 academic years to enhance the campus pedestrian experience. Two mid-block crosswalks, at 33rd Street and 34th Street will be improved to include new signage, traffic signals, and traffic calming measures to reduce speeds.

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[X]  

 

Telecommuting

 

See Additional Comments

 

See Additional Comments

[X]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

See Additional Comments

 

See Additional Comments

 

Additional comments:

Flexible work options, as outlined in Penn’s Human Resources Flexible Work Hours website (http://www.hr.upenn.edu/Quality/Worklife/FlexOptions/Default.aspx ) are: Flextime: The most requested, easiest to manage and the most affordable FWO, flextime offers flexibility in arrival, departure and/or lunch times, typically with a designated core-time mid-day during which all staff are present. Flexplace: This arrangement allows for a portion of the job to be performed off-site, on a regular, recurring basis. The majority of work time is spent at the office and the off-site work typically is done at home. It may be the most complicated flexible work option to arrange since it generally requires electronic equipment and technological support. Compressed Work Schedules: A traditional 35-40 hour work week is condensed into fewer than five days of work. This option is more easily applied to non-exempt (weekly paid) staff for whom maximum work hours are identified, but it is not ruled out for monthly paid staff who may work more than 40 hours during the work week. The Fair Labor Standards Act requires weekly paid staff to be paid overtime if they work over 40 hours in a work week. Part-time work is a regular arrangement for between 17.5 and 28 hours a week. This is different from a temporary work assignment where an employee is expected to have a temporary, non-recurring relationship to the workplace and does not receive paid time off. Job sharing allows two staff members to share the responsibilities of one full-time position, typically with a prorated salary and paid time off. This is not the same as a part-time job. Each staff member shares a specific proportion of a full-time position. Creative and innovative schedules can be designed to meet the needs of the job sharers and the office.


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STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:        

Urban

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

182

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

14M

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

20227.5

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

5661

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

27

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

http://thepenngarden.wordpress.com/ The Penn Garden was funded by a Fall 2009 Green Fund grant. In February 2010, Bon Appétit at Penn Dining introduced a hydroponic garden, which is based on a system of pipes that provide a constant flow of nutritious water past the roots of the plants. The garden, housed on the first floor of the 1920 Commons Residential Dining Hall, was started as an educational tool as well as a means of providing locally grown herbs and produce to be used in the Dining Halls, especially during the Winter months when such items are not available locally. The garden also raises awareness of new agriculture techniques that can help provide nutritious and sustainable food sources. Currently the garden is home to a variety of lettuce, basil, tomatoes, chili peppers, sweet peppers, and various herbs, many of which are used in the dining hall salad bars. During the academic year, students volunteer to help check nutrient levels and maintain the system, ensuring the garden stays healthy and green. Plans are to substantially expand the garden in the coming year.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

Penn Purchasing has a preferred vendor agreement with Quench water filters which are being phased in across campus to replace bottled water in administrative and faculty offices and at student cafeterias. At the Division of Facilities and Real Estate Services, the Quench machine has saved over $12,000 by eliminating bottled water purchases (taking into account the new drinking glasses distributed to administrative staff, and the to-go non-PBA water bottles distributed to operations and custodial staff. The Green Campus Partnership took the opportunity to place an explanation of the environmental benefits of the program inside every glass and bottle distributed.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

The undergraduate major in Environmental Studies, one of the country’s first, was launched in 1972.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

Minor in Environmental Studies

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

Penn offers a Masters in Environmental Studies (MES) program. Today, Penn offers dual-degree programs that allow students to combine the MES degree with graduate degrees from Wharton, Penn Law, or the School of Design. Courses included in the combined Masters of Business Administration/MES program, such as Environmental Sustainability and Value Creation, demonstrate how businesses can implement “triple-bottom line” goals of environmental sustainability, economic prosperity, and social equity.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

Penn’s opportunities for sustainability studies at the graduate level are wide-ranging and comprehensive. The Masters of Environmental Studies program, as noted above, provides cross-disciplinary opportunities for almost every other professional program, including Law, Nursing, Wharton, Engineering, Communications, and so on. Specific programs in Penn’s 12 graduate schools include: • Penn’s School of Design Masters in Ecological Design, launched in 2010, complements the programs in architecture, landscape architecture, city and regional planning, and historic preservation – all of which offer specific classes in sustainable design. • Master of Science in Applied Geosciences candidates focus on developing technical expertise in hydrogeology, geochemistry, engineering geology, and geophysics. • The Masters in Organizational Dynamics program offers a sustainability track. This two-year executive program is targeted to mid-career professionals who want to expand their management and leadership capabilities. • Penn offers PhDs in several earth science branches, including geology, hydrology, oceanology, climate science, and ecology.

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

http://www.pennoutdoors.org/

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

Since 2007

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

In Penn’s urban setting, it is more economical to have dual stream: plastics/glass/metals and paper/cardboard to be able to respond to market conditions for different materials. Significant investment has been made in dual stream infrastructure and education.

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]     

 

Student trustee position

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

Minor in Environmental Management and Sustainability.

 


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