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Report Card 2011

University of British Columbia

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2011, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2010. To access surveys from other schools, go to the surveys section of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

School name: University of British Columbia

Date submitted: July 28, 2010

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

 

1)  Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy and/or sustainability plan? Check all that apply.

[  ]  No

[X]  Yes, a sustainability policy. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X ]  Yes, a sustainability plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description:

Background & Purpose of Policy #5: • to develop an environmentally responsible campus communities that are economically viable and reflects the values of the members of its campus communities; • to ensure integration of ecological, economic and social considerations at all levels of strategic planning and operations within the University; • to work towards a sustainable future in cooperation with organizations such as the GVRD and the City of Vancouver; • to assume a leadership role through practicing sustainable development and instilling sustainable development values in its graduates and employees, through research, teaching, and operations. http://www.universitycounsel.ubc.ca/policies/policy5.pdf UBC’s sustainability strategy UBC was also the first and only university in Canada to create a comprehensive sustainability strategy. Inspirations and Aspirations: The Sustainability Strategy 2006-2010 was produced in 2006 in response to the university’s sustainable development policy, which calls for clearly targeted action plans in all departments to improve performance in key sustainability areas. The strategy outlined UBC Vancouver’s goals, objectives, and action plans for improving the institution’s social, economic, and ecological performance over the next five years. http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/planning-and-reporting In 2009, UBC went through a 6 month consultative process to produce a proposed Sustainability Academic Strategy (http://www.sas.ubc.ca/), a mid-level academic plan, which was accepted by the UBC Executive in October. In January 2010, UBC announced the creation of the UBC Sustainability Initiative (USI), which will integrate academic and operational sustainability across UBC' Vancouver Campus, and which has an annual budget of approximately $2 million. The USI has three offices: the Campus Sustainability Office, the Teaching and Learning Office and the Research and Partnerships Office (www.sustain.ubc.ca). Starting in 2010, the Campus Sustainability Office will evaluate lessons learned from Inspirations & Aspirations and start developing a new Campus Operational Sustainability Plan. This Plan will roll-up UBC’s current sustainability targets while supporting operational departments to make action plans with ambitious targets for social, ecological and economic sustainability. The Teaching and Learning Office and the Research and Partnerships Office are developing new curriculum and teaching opportunities and new research partnerships and activities.

 

2)  Has the president of your institution signed any commitments related to environmental stewardship and/or greenhouse gas reductions? Check all that apply.

[  ]  None

[  ]  American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)

[X]  Talloires Declaration

[X ]  Other. Please describe: UBC has initiated and signed onto the “University and College Presidents’ Climate Change Statement of Action for Canada” http://climatechangeact.siraza.net/ 


3)  Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan? Check all that apply.
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

[X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide the URL below.

 

Description: UBC has completed a new comprehensive campus plan. Sustainability is a major value for UBC and as such, it is incorporated throughout the plan. The plan serves to integrate buildings, infrastructure and landscape systems into a more compact, livable and sustainable whole. Detailed sections such as the Design Guidelines include specific instructions for how LEED is to be implemented on campus, to ensure achievement of campus sustainability goals in all new construction/major renovations. http://www.campusplan.ubc.ca/ This is the link to the draft Campus Plan. Please refer to page 7f for how sustainability is addressed in the Campus Plan: http://campusplan.ubc.ca/docs/pdf/Ph5_DraftCampusPlan.pdf UBC’s new (2009) Strategic Plan, Place and Promise, contains the vision statement: “The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be one of the world's best universities, will prepare students to become exceptional global citizens, promote the values of a civil and sustainable society, and conduct outstanding research to serve the people of British Columbia, Canada, and the world.” (http://strategicplan.ubc.ca/the-plan/) Sustainability is one of the nine commitment areas in the plan, with the following goal statement: “UBC is committed to exploring and exemplifying all aspects of economic, environmental, and social sustainability.” This section of the plan contains 3 goals and 9 actions. (http://strategicplan.ubc.ca/the-plan/sustainability/) The Sustainability Academic Strategy (SAS) produced in 2009 made 20 recommendations on how UBC can explore and exemplify sustainability across teaching & learning, research & partnerships, and operations. The UBC Sustainability Initiative created in January 2010 (in accordance with one of the recommendations in the SAS) is charged with implementing 17 of those recommendations. The Campus Sustainability Office, which existed prior to the SAS and USI, will continue its focus on operational and behavioural sustainability, while the new Research and Partnerships Office, and Teaching and Learning Office are developing initial work plans. The overall goal is to integrate academic and operational sustainability under two cross-cutting themes: campus as a living laboratory of sustainability, and the university as an agent of change in the community.

 

ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEES

 

4)  Does your school have any administrative councils, committees or task forces that advise on and/or implement sustainability policies and programs?

You may provide detailed information for up to three committees. If you have one advisory committee that is broken down into subcommittees, please indicate that you have one committee and answer the questions on the following page for the entire committee (the sum of data for all subcommittees).

Yes

 

Please provide the number of committees: Three committees

 

Committee I

 

5)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name: History of previous sustainability committees at UBC: Since about 2000, the Sustainability Advisory committee advised the UBC Sustainability Office on its program and policy implementation. In 2008 the President’s Advisory Council on Sustainability replaced the Sustainability Advisory Committee. Its purpose and scope was to ‘clearly identify, facilitate and communicate the university’s role in sustainability through a coordinated approach to the examination and understanding of economic, environmental and social sustainability within UBC, and to promote demonstrated synergies and effective utilization of resources for academic programs, related support and administrative activities and by encouraging sustainability activities both at UBC and in the external community.’ It consisted of an external advisory board, operations and administration working group, academic programs working group, research and community partnership working group, communications working group, UBC-Okanagan working group and development working group. In 2009, the 6 month Sustainable Academic Strategy (SAS) process was instituted, culminating in a proposed strategy. In 2010 President Toope, acting on the recommendations of the SAS announced the establishment of the UBC Sustainability Initiative (USI). In January 2010, the President’s Advisory Council was disbanded and a new USI structure created. The USI is guided by existing strategies and plans: There is one Steering Committee and two advisory committees attached to the USI. In addition there is an external Advisory Board being created, which will advise the President of UBC directly. • The University Sustainability Initiative (USI) Steering Committee. Membership consists of the Provost (VP, Academic); the VP Research and International Affairs; the VP Finance, Resources and Operations; two Deans (currently Science and Applied Science); and the Principal of the College for Interdisciplinary Studies. A student representative will be added this year. This Steering Committee was established in March 2010. There have been 4 meetings as of July 7, 2010.• The USI Regional Sustainability Council. This will consist of about 12 prominent sustainability figures in the BC region. It will advise the USI Steering Committee, and will be established in the summer of 2010. • The USI Student Sustainability Council. This will consist of 6 students, two chosen by the undergraduate student society, two by the graduate student society and two at large, to be chosen through a call for applications. It will be established in the summer of 2010. • The UBC External Advisory Board on Sustainability. This will consist of approximately 20 high level national and international figures in the sustainability field and will report to, and Advise UBC President on sustainability issues. It will be established in July 2010.

Number of meetings: 4

 

6)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

8

Faculty

 

2

Staff

 

1

Students

 

6

Other. Please describe.   

 

Approx. 32 prominent sustainability experts from BC (12) and at the national or international level (20)

 

7)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name       

 

Position

Chair 1   

 

Dave Farrar (VP Academic and Provost).

 

Chair of the USI Steering Committee

Chair 2

 

Mike Harcourt (former Premier of BC and former Mayor of Vancouver).

 

Chair of the USI Regional Sustainability Council

Chair 3

 

To be determined

 

Chair of the USI Student Sustainability Council, Chair of the UBC External Advisory Board on Sustainability

 

8)  To whom does the committee report?
[X ]  President/Chancellor
[X ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[X] Other: The USI Steering Committee reports to the President and Vice Chancellor, Prof. Stephen Toope. The International Advisory Board on Sustainability will report to the President and Vice Chancellor, Prof. Stephen Toope; the Regional Sustainability Council and the Student Sustainability Council report the USI Steering Committee. 

 

9)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed       

 

Progress     

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

Moderate

 

The SAS contained several far-reaching recommendations on teaching and learning which the Teaching and Learning Office is actively pursuing. Spotlight awards for adding sustainability content to existing courses have been awarded and 5 Teaching and Learning Fellows were appointed in July 2010

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

1. Procurement policy: Two key documents that guide our ethical and sustainable purchasing decisions. Principles of Sustainability http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Purchase/principled%20model.pdf Supplier Code of Conduct http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Supplier%20code%20ofconduct%202008%20July%2016.pdf.In 2008 Supply Management developed and implemented principles of sustainability and a supplier code of conduct for procurement. Efforts in 2009 have been focused on embedding weighted criterion based on sustainability into bid documents, inclusion of the supplier code of conduct and working directly with preferred suppliers on waste and emission management strategies. 2.2. Sustainable Development Policy #5 (since 1997/revised 2005): http://www.universitycounsel.ubc.ca/policies/policy5.pdf.New staff in 2009/2010: in the context of the creation of the USI several new staff positions were created: Communications Manager, Executive Director USI, Director Strategic Partnerships, Associate Director USI. 2 Academic Directors, Research & Strategic Partnerships. Campus Sustainability Office: Water and Waste Engineer.

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

1. In 2010 UBC approved a new set of climate goals: 33% reduction from 2007 levels by 2015; 67% reduction by 2020, and 100% reduction by 2050. (It is important to note that we achieved our Kyoto targets (a 6% reduction from 1990 levels for core academic buildings in 2007, despite a 14% growth in floorspace). 2. In 2009, UBC prepared its Climate Action Plan by leading campus-wide consultations and working groups to develop targets and strategies for emission reductions. 3. The UBC Executive has endorsed the climate action vision and four commitments identified in the development process:• Become a net positive energy producer by 2050,• Partner for change,• Use the campus as a living laboratory, and • Account for the full costs of our decisions. 4. UBC has defined a roadmap to implement a plan that significantly reduces climate change impacts within a generation. Several upcoming projects will achieve the short-term target of 33% reduction by 2015: • The UBC Bioenergy Research and Demonstration Project will generate clean heat and electricity through biomass gasification, and will reduce GHGs by 12%. • Improve energy efficiency in academic buildings by participating in BC Hydro’s Continuous Optimization Program, targeting a 10% reduction. • Converting the district heating system from steam to hot water, estimated to reduce GHGs by 20%. • Transition to a low emission fleet, targeting a 40% reduction in associated GHGs. 5. http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/2009GHGInventorySummary.pdf

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

Secure access to debt to fund student housing expansion and green infrastructure. - Develop and approve a revised investment strategy reflective of UBC’s commitment to social sustainability.

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

1. In 2009-10, UBC conducted a pilot of BC Hydro’s Continuous Optimization program in two academic buildings. This program optimizes building performance by identifying and implementing low-cost operational and maintenance changes, and then maintains this new optimized state through real-time performance monitoring and response. The buildings have been connected to Pulse Energy’s energy management software for tracking and analysis by the energy manager. In addition, the software alerts Building Operations staff to quickly catch and rectify any abnormal energy use. Building occupants can view the energy consumption through the user-friendly dashboard interface and watch how the building’s energy use changes in real-time. The program will be extended to 72 core academic buildings, comprising 55% of campus floor area, from 2010 to 2014. Energy use in buildings accounts for over 95% of UBC's greenhouse gas emissions. The goal for the program, combined with behaviour change programs and initiatives, is to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions by 10 per cent (compared to 2007) by the year 2015. 2. Lighting retrofits in Fraser Parkade and West Parkade, along with a retrofit of the Winter Sports Stadium, contributed to reductions in ancillary operations’ energy use. 3. The UBC Executive prioritized a student-centered dormitory competition as an early action item to emerge from the draft UBC Climate Action Plan, which Campus & Community Planning presented to the Executive in September 2009. Collaborating with key stakeholders, the Campus Sustainability Office (CSO) is working to coordinate the design and implementation of a resource consumption competition for student residences, to be launched in the fall semester 2010.. r of 2010.

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[X]

 

Significant

 

Ongoing involvement in Project Seahorse allows for further engagement in the campus program supporting sustainable seafood choices. § Food Services was heavily involved in the promotion and participation of “Blueberry Fest” – a one week campus wide event promoting local, organic blueberries and blueberry recipes in partnership with the BC Blueberry Council. § As a sponsor of Sprouting Chefs Summer Camp – a kitchen garden program for youth, Food Services helped educate kids on healthy cooking, the UBC Farm and the importance of eating local and sustainable food. § With the opening of the Niche Café and a food outlet in the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) building, Food Services will continue to expand its offering of culturally diverse social spaces and healthy menu options for the community

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

The provincial government mandate for all public sector buildings to achieve LEED Gold certification (or certified equivalent) has been in effect since May 2008. In 09/10, UBC added the additional requirement that new construction must also achieve an energy performance rating of 42% below Canada’s Model National Energy Code for Buildings. This additional requirement ensures that new projects will help achieve UBC’s green house gas reduction targets. § The Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability broke ground, and is aspiring to achieve the highest level of LEED certification, Platinum, as well as the Living Building Challenge. CIRS will be an internationally recognized centre that will accelerate the adoption of sustainable building practices and sustainable urban development policies.§ In 09/10, the new Law building, Bioenergy Research Project, Earth Systems Science Building and the Tennis Centre got under way and registered under the LEED system with the Canada Green Building Council. As an alternative to LEED, UBC is piloting its Residential Environmental Assessment Program (REAP) to certify two student residence projects, one on each of the Vancouver and Kelowna campuses. § Over the 09/10 fiscal year, four residential projects in the Wesbrook Place neighbourhood earned certification under UBC REAP. UBC Properties Trust’s Wesbrook Village Supermarket project was completed and earned REAP Gold certification. Two other UBC Properties Trust projects, MBA House and a faculty and staff rental building, earned REAP Silver along with ‘The Wesbrook’, a high rise condominium project by Aspac Development.

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

Residential Sustainability Coordinator Program. The UBC residence sustainability coordinators (Res SCs) are students living in residence at UBC's Vancouver Campus who work with other energetic volunteers to lead, inspire, network, learn and create change in their residences and on campus. The Res SC program involves 25 undergraduate and graduate students and reaches approximately 2900 students through its outreach events and activities. Res SCs offer a variety of outreach events to their peers living in residence that aim to raise awareness of sustainability issues both within residence, locally and globally. 2009-10 events and initiatives included: § Launch of the Res SC socials: a networking event for Res SCs living in different residences to share ideas and solutions and to hear presentations from campus partners. § Launch of a Res SC Facebook group page to better connect Res SCs living in different residences and to promote Res SC events. § Sustainability Week which included events such as: Stuff Swaps, Power Hour (turn off your power). § Compost and recycling sorting games to raise awareness of how to segregate compostable and recyclable materials. § Field trips to the UBC Farm and UBC’s In-Vessel composting facility. § Movie nights featuring movies about sustainability issues. Student Involvement in Sustainability. In 2009, the Campus Sustainability Office organized and launched the “Green Lounge” for UBC’s Imagine orientation event. The Campus Sustainability Office collaborated with Imagine staff to create a sustainability specific section that showcased 21 sustainability related student groups and campus departments. UBC also supported 20 paid student jobs and internships in sustainability over the 2009/10 school year. Interns worked throughout the year at the Campus Sustainability Office, TREK Transportation Demand Management Program Centre, UBC Alma Mater Society, Waste Management, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth, the University Sustainability Initiative (Teaching and Learning Office) and Student Housing and Hospitality Services.Student involvement in sustainability is significant. An inventory of active student-run sustainability groups found that as of the 2009-10 school year there are at least 26 active sustainability related groups, clubs and associations at UBC's Vancouver Campus. These groups are comprehensive in their scope and activities. Selected student-led sustainability initiatives in 2009-10 include: NOW (No Other World) Climate Action Conference co-hosted by the Alma Mater Society, Common Energy and the Student Environment Centre; Think Outside the Bottle Campaign to raise awareness about the environmental impact of bottled water co-led by Common Energy and the Alma Mater Society; 2nd annual Chasing Sustainability Conference hosted by the Commerce Undergraduate Society – Sustainability which looks at sustainability within business; A waste audit of UBC’s student union building managed by the Alma Mater Society’s sustainability coordinator

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

The TREK Program Centre’s sustainability highlights include:§ an aggressive new bicycle parking policy requiring lockers, showers, washrooms and secure storage in all new development on campus. In the last year, TREK has increased bicycle parking capacity on campus by 400 spots, and put down 64 “sharrows” indicating a shared pathways for cyclists. § In 2009, TREK ran two Bike to Work Week events. UBC’s cycling community was recognized on Thursday, June 10, 2010, for playing a crucial role in the Vancouver Area Cycling Coalition’s annual Bike to Work Week. A region-wide competition, Bike to Work Week ran from May 31 to June 1, 2010 and encouraged commuters to opt for their bikes over driving. UBC won top honours for most kilometers (km) cycled in the 1000+ category and achieving the highest participation rate. UBC was also acknowledged as the overall winner in the Higher Education category. Despite the wind and rain, Bike to Work Week saw an increase of over 80% in the number of riders at commuter stations, and the week-long event drew 4,564 cyclists from a record number of 950 teams. Of these, over 270 teams were entering the competition for the first time. In total, the cyclists reduced regional GHG emissions by 32,000kg; the equivalent of filling up a car 228 times. UBC cyclists logged more than 11,000 of the 175,000 kms cycled across the Metro region. § conducted a feasibility study on implementing a bike share program on campus. § In March of 2010, TREK and Campus and Community Planning completed the first phase of the Transit and Cycling Transportation Consultation, aimed at determining the location of future transit and cycling infrastructure on campus. § TREK has 20 ambitious new actions that will help UBC achieve its recently released GHG reduction targets. These range from providing plug-ins for electric assist vehicles, to re-evaluating parking policies to discourage car ownership by first year students living on campus.

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

Waste Audit 2010: In February 2010 the UBC Campus Sustainability Office awarded a contract to EBA Engineering Consultants Ltd. to conduct a Zero Waste Audit and Analysis of solid waste at UBC's Vancouver Campus (including the University Neighbourhoods Association and construction waste) to be completed October 31, 2010. The final report for this contract will include: § Literature Review on solid waste for institutional and residential sectors. § Waste Characterization Study Report for UBC’s institutional and residential waste based on three 24 hour samples (taken from March 29 – April 1, 2010). § Analysis and Assessment of UBC’s waste management systems. § Recommended steps for UBC to achieve 70% diversion by 2015 and a long term goal of zero waste as per the Metro Vancouver Zero Waste Challenge.

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

A water model for the campus was completed and will inform the new Integrated Water Servicing Plan. Purpose of the Integrated Water Servicing Plan: § Provides an analysis of the performance of UBC’s water, sanitary and stormwater systems and identification of critical infrastructure upgrades needed. § Modeling of the impacts on our water infrastructure by the future 2030 build-out of the campus as described in the Vancouver Campus Plan and land use documents. § 3 scenarios of water management targets were modeled: status quo, moderate sustainability initiatives, bold sustainability initiatives. Based on different potential targets in managing our water use/demand, impacts on resulting infrastructure needs were predicted. § Proposed alternatives for meeting future growth and development. § Sets the stage for integrated water planning, management and policy development.

Other

 

[  ]

 

Significant

 

1. In 2009 the Communications Working Group worked on creating a new website that encompasses an integrated perspective of UBC’s sustainability programs, initiatives, courses, groups/clubs, polices/strategies, and tools in the areas of: Comprehensive sustainable campus; Sustainability focused curriculum & programs; Sustainability related research. http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/ This website offers a broad selection of courses to take, research to participate in, experts to consult, and ways to get involved in campus sustainability at UBC. 2. South Campus Academic Plan: At their Dec 2008 meeting, UBC’s Board of Governors directed the administration to create an academic plan for the 24-hectare parcel of land on South Campus that is home to the UBC Farm. Phase 1: Academic Plan (draft Jul 2009, final Sep 2009). A draft academic plan for South Campus including:i. over-arching vision and mission, ii. specific goals and tangible objectives to achieve this vision, and recommendations that support the realization of this vision to carry forward for integration into the Sustainability Academic Strategy, and the South Campus business /operations plan.Phase 2: Land Use Plan (draft late 2009). A comprehensive land use and operations plan for South Campus including: Specific activities with quantifiable metrics for evaluation and timeframes, ii. resource requirements to achieve activities (land use, buildings / infrastructure / equipment and capital costs, human resources requirements, operating and variable costs), iii. business plan that identifies ongoing revenue sources to support specific operational and long-term academic goals.

 

Committee II

 

5b)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name:

Number of meetings:

 

6b)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7b)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

 

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8b)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ]  Other:  

 

9b)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress 

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit     

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

Committee III

 

5c)  Please provide the name of the committee and note the number of meetings held since August 2009.

 

Committee name:

Number of meetings:

 

6c)  Please provide the number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

When providing the data on each stakeholder group, you should provide the total number across all subcommittees (you do not need to numerate individual tallies for subcommittees).

 

 

 

Number of representatives

Administrators

 

Faculty

 

Staff

 

Students

 

Other. Please describe.     

 

 

7c)  Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.

 

 

 

Name      

 

Position

Chair 1    

 

 

Chair 2

 

 

Chair 3

 

 

 

8c)  To whom does the committee report?
[  ]  President/Chancellor
[  ]  Vice President/Vice Chancellor
[  ]  Other: 

 

9c)  Please indicate the key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2009. For each issue addressed, please indicate and describe progress made.
“Moderate” progress indicates that issues were discussed thoroughly and projects are in the early stages of planning. “Significant” progress indicates that new policies or programs were implemented, or are in the final stages of planning and approval.

 

 

 

Addressed  

 

Progress  

 

Description

Academics

Examples: minor, major and concentration programs, curricular additions, research projects

 

[  ]

 

 

Administration

Examples: procurement policies, institution-wide sustainability policy, sustainability-related staff positions

 

[  ]

 

 

Climate

Examples: draft climate action plan, greenhouse gas emissions inventory

 

[  ]

 

 

Endowment

Examples: proxy voting guidelines, investment advisory committees

 

[  ]

 

 

Energy

Examples: conservation/behavioral change programs, retrofits and efficiency improvements

 

[  ]

 

 

Food

Examples: policies to increase purchase of local/sustainably produced foods, implementing campus gardens     

 

[  ]

 

 

Green Building

Examples: design or construction policy

 

[  ]

 

 

Student Involvement

Examples:  speaker series, peer-to-peer residential sustainability education programs, student guide to sustainable living on campus

 

[  ]

 

 

Transportation

Examples: incentives for use of environmentally-preferable commuting options, campus fleet improvements, connecting students with public transit      

 

[  ]

 

 

Waste Reduction

Examples: recycling, composting, reducing consumption

 

[  ]

 

 

Water

Examples: water conservation, reducing campus pollution, bottled water campaigns

 

[  ]

 

 

Other

 

[  ]

 

 

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT                                  


10) Does your school have an office or department exclusively dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus? Please note: this does not include academic programs focused on sustainability.
Please provide the number of staff in the office in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). FTE for a full-time staff member would be 1, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Office name: UBC Sustainability Initiative, containing a central secretariat and three offices: Campus Sustainability Office (CSO), Teaching and Learning Office (TLO) and Research and Partnerships Office (RPO)

Year created: The CSO was created in 1998. The other components of USI were created in 2010.

Description: The UBC Campus Sustainability Office (CSO) on the Vancouver Campus coordinates the University’s numerous operational sustainability initiatives and provides a central hub on the Vancouver campus to engage with the campus community and facilitate operational sustainability learning and practice. UBC-Okanagan Sustainability Office (created in 2010): The Sustainability Office at UBC's Okanagan campus leads and facilitates the advancement of a culture of sustainability by building and supporting the growth of its social, cultural, ecological, and economic sustainability. We provide information, resources, programs and connections to grow all facets of sustainability within our campus community. USI Secretariat: The USI secretariats role is to coordinate the three offices to ensure the integration of academic and operational sustainability across the whole Vancouver campus. The Teaching and Learning Office (TLO): The TLO coordinates, supports and enhances undergraduate and graduate sustainability education at UBC’s Vancouver campus. To increase student access to curricular and co-curricular sustainability learning opportunities, the office, along with 5 Sustainability Teaching & Learning Fellows (a new program launched in 2010), are developing new sustainability courses, creating pathways for undergraduate students in any discipline to study sustainability, and working towards defining a strategic vision for sustainability education at UBC. The office also maintains up-to-date sustainability education resources for students online. Research and Partnership Office: develops strategic partnerships to expand research to support the USI and to expand research at UBC in support of USI objectives. It also markets the “solutions capacity” of UBC to Companies and Organizations outside UBC. Working with these Companies and Organizations, this office helps to identify and implement UBC-partnership opportunities which will significantly benefit their “competitiveness” while realizing UBC’s teaching, research and operational aspirations.UBC-Okanagan Sustainability Office: UBC-Okanagan Sustainability Office (created in 2010): The Sustainability Office at UBC's Okanagan campus leads and facilitates the advancement of a culture of sustainability by building and supporting the growth of its social, cultural, ecological, and economic sustainability. We provide information, resources, programs and connections to grow all facets of sustainability within our campus community. http://web.ubc.ca/okanagan/sustainability/welcome.html

Number of staff in office (in FTE): 17, plus 5 faculty appointed to USI

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

Please provide your answers to questions 11-12 in terms of full-time equivalent (FTE). For example, FTE for a half-time staff member would be 0.5.

 

11) Does your school employ a sustainability coordinator, director, or manager?

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts in full-time equivalent (FTE).

Yes

 

Please provide details below.

 

Title: Executive Director, USI

Department: University Sustainability Initiative

Time worked (in FTE): FTE

Job description: The USI Executive Director sets strategic goals and priorities for the USI and provides overall direction to USI staff. He reports regularly to the USI Steering Committee on the status of USI operations, projects and initiatives. He acts as the liaison with USI advisory councils and is the USI’s principal ambassador and spokesperson. The Executive Director also assumes the critical role of liaison with UBC faculty and is responsible for the integration of the Teaching and Learning, Research and Partnerships and Operational Sustainability portfolios into a coordinated set of USI objectives and targets.

 

 12) Please list the titles and a brief job description for all other full- and part-time staff who are engaged in planning, implementing or managingsustainability initiatives on your campus (e.g. Assistant Sustainability Coordinator, Food Services Sustainability Coordinator, Green Office Program Manager).

Your response may include faculty/staff who, in addition to their regular responsibilities, are overseeing campus sustainability initiatives (similar to the responsibilities of a full-time sustainability coordinator). For those faculty/staff partially assigned to sustainability work, please indicate time allotted for sustainability efforts (in FTE).Your response may include graduate assistants.

 

Your response should exclude academic researchers, administrative assistants, technical support staff, and recycling/compost collections staff. Your response should also exclude information about undergraduate student interns and student employees. This information should be provided in the Student Involvement section of the survey (questions 56-61).

 

Title      

 

Department      

 

Time worked (in FTE)      

 

Job description

Associate Director

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

1

 

The Associate Director oversees the process of creating a USI strategic planning and implementation framework, including USI metrics and reporting mechanisms. He oversees the process of adapting and expanding the initial set of USI recommendations into prioritized, viable projects and initiatives.

Manager, Communications

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

1

 

The Manager of Communications is responsible for overall USI communications strategy and for the development and implementation of USI communications plans and initiatives.

PICS Campus Coordinator

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

1

 

The PICS Coordinator is responsible for all PICS (Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions)-UBC related activities and events, including seminars, workshops and collaborative research initiatives.

Manager Special Projects

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

.4

 

The Manager of Special Events and Projects is responsible for the coordination of strategic USI initiatives such as conferences and symposiums, town hall meetings, speaker series, etc.

Academic Director, Research & Strategic Partnerships

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

This is a UBC faculty member, appointed to USI.

 

The Academic Director, Research & Strategic Partnership works in close partnership with both the co-Academic Director, Research & Strategic Partnerships as well as with the Director, Strategic Partnership in the pursuit and development of strategic partnerships to support the USI.

Director, Strategic Partnerships

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

.5

 

The Director, Strategic Partnerships markets the “solutions capacity” of UBC to Companies and Organizations outside UBC.

Director, Teaching and Learning Office

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

This is a UBC faculty member, appointed to USI.

 

The Director of the USI Teaching & Learning Office is a faculty member who oversees and provides direction to the activities of the USI Teaching & Learning Office and is responsible for helping develop, and promote, priority initiatives determined in partnership with the executive director of the UBC Sustainability Initiative.

Associate Director, Teaching and Learning Office

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

1

 

The Associate Director manages the day-to-day activities of the USI Teaching & Learning Office and is responsible for implementing priority initiatives determined in partnership with the office’s Director, Faculty Fellows and relevant individuals and groups of the USI team.

UBC Farm Academic Liaison

 

University Sustainability Initiative

 

This is a UBC faculty member, appointed to USI.

 

The UBC Farm Liaison of the USI is a faculty member who is the contact person for academic and operational links between the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems-UBC Farm and the USI.

Director Operational Sustainability

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

 

1

 

The Director, Operational Sustainability directs the activities of the Campus Sustainability Office (CSO). The Office is responsible for sustainability initiatives in the planning, development and operation of the campus lands and facilities, for engaging the community in sustainability initiatives and encouraging sustainable behaviours.

Climate & Energy Engineer

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1

 

The Climate and Energy Engineer provides engineering and project support for Campus Sustainability Office’s climate and energy programs during both development and implementation phases.

Project Coordinator, Campus Sustainability Plan

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

.8

 

             The Project Coordinator is responsible for the university’s sustainability campus plan, assisting the Director in developing the university’s overall sustainability strategy and supporting campus units in achieving their sustainability goals.

Manager Green Buildings & Engagemetn

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1

 

The Manager, Green Building & Engagement is responsible for establishing and implementing policies and procedures for green building and for engagement in operational sustainability; for overseeing and coordinating existing engagement programs; and for implementing new engagement initiatives to create a culture of sustainability at UBC.

Coordinator & Manager, SEEDS program  (job share)

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1.2

 

The Coordinator & Manager of the Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) program creates strategic partnerships between staff, faculty and students that contribute to advancing sustainability in UBC campus operations.

Coordinator Campus Engagement

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1

 

              The Coordinator, Campus Engagement manages the Sustainability Coordinator (SC) Program and the Student Internship Program as well as supervises the development and implementation of student engagement programs and initiatives related to operational sustainability.

Coordinator Reporting and Researching

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1

 

The Reporting and Research Coordinator is responsible for the university’s sustainability performance monitoring, reporting and accountability program. The Reporting and Research Coordinator also conducts sustainability program research and implementation.

Waster & Zero Waste Engineer

 

Campus Sustainability Office

 

1

 

This position has responsibility for planning, providing consultation services and professional engineering abilities in supporting the university's goals for achieving zero waste and net positive water.

Director Transportation Office

 

UBC’s Transportation Demand Management Department

 

1

 

Manages and directs the Transportation Demand Management Department’s core business activities. The mission of the department: Improving transportation choices by promoting sustainable transportation at UBC.

 

WEBSITE


13) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

If yes, please provide URL

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca

 

GREEN PURCHASING


14) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

Yes

 

If yes, please indicate the areas to which your policy pertains, and whether purchase is required or encouraged:

 

 

 

Required      

 

Encouraged      

Appliances

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Cleaning products

 

[ X ]

 

[   ]

Computers/electronics

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Lighting

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Office supplies

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Paper products

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Reduced packaging for purchases               

 

[  ]

 

[X]

Other. Please describe below.

 

[  ]

 

[X]


Other description: green purchasing policy is required in family housing for appliances. UBC Vancouver Campus: a) UBC developed and implemented principles of sustainability for procurement and developed a supplier code of conduct. In addition, UBC has made the commitment to Undertake Behavior Change Initiatives. This action will see UBC actively engaging with and encouraging the campus community to achieve GHG emissions reductions through existing and new behavior change initiatives. Some of those actions include expanded use and promotion of teleconference studios. Employees are encouraged to use the teleconferencing studios at “no charge” to host meetings. UBC has also instituted their document management strategies with Xerox Global Services where right sizing machines and smart document management is being rolled out for all campus sites. Our Supply Management Travel program has experienced growth in the past two years with a partnership agreement with WestJet Airlines. WestJet Airlines provides a price per cent discount on all reservations and a further allocation off of the ticket price to purchase carbon offsets through Offsetters Climate Neutral Society. Two key documents that guide our ethical and sustainable purchasing decisions 1. Principles of Sustainability http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Purchase/principled%20model.pdf 2. Supplier Code of Conduct http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Supplier%20code%20ofconduct%202008%20July%2016.pdf UBC Okanagan Campus: no Green Purchasing Policy, however, a best practices policy is in place.

 

 

 15) Please indicate in which categories you regularly purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products. Check all that apply.  If possible, provide the percentage of products purchased that are ENERGY STAR qualified for each category.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage purchased  

 

Description

[X]

 

Appliances

 

100

 

In all faculty housing built on campus

[  ]

 

Building products

 

 

[X]

 

Computers/electronics     

 

 

 

[X]

 

Heating and cooling

 

 

 

 

[X]

 

Lighting and fans

 

 

 

 

[X]

 

Plumbing

 

 

 

 

Additional comments: Energy Star rated products are recommended by Supply Management. Supply Management includes the above wording into formal bid processes and has adopted this wording on scientific equipment as well. In addition formal bids outline that it is preferred that the proposed equipment has water saving, energy conserving and other environmentally friendly features that support the University's Sustainability objectives.

 

16)  Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

For each of the items below, please indicate the percentage of purchases that contain post-consumer recycled content, are chlorine-free processed, and/or are Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified. Please provide approximate data, to the best of your ability, if your institution uses a decentralized purchasing structure.

               

 

 

Percentage
post-consumer
recycled content     

 

Percentage
Forest Stewardship
Council certified   

 

Percentage
chlorine-free
 processed     

 

Description

Envelopes

 

 

 

 

Facial tissues

 

 

 

 

Napkins

 

 

 

 

Notepads

 

 

 

 

Office paper

 

72

 

72

 

72

 

 

 

Paper towels

 

60

 

60

 

60

 

 

Other. Please describe.

 

Toilet paper: 60

 

60

 

60

 

 

 

Additional comments: UBC Vancouver uses approximately 880,000 lbs of paper annually. In 2009, UBC Vancouver used 258,080 kg of paper with associated GHG emissions of 665 tonnes CO2e. Partway through 2009, UBC negotiated with its supplier to provide 30% post-consumer recycled content paper at the same price as virgin paper. Removing the “it costs more” argument helped drive the change in behavior. The supplier also automatically substituted 30% recycled content paper for any remaining orders of virgin paper. As a result, 72% of paper purchases in 2009 were 30 per cent post-consumer recycled content; in addition, 4% of purchases were 100 per cent recycled content. Our strategy is now focused on paper reduction in operations. Towels & TP are 100% recycled & eco logo certified. No Bleaching used in the process- so 100% chlorine free. 80 % Post consumer recycled total 100% recycled.

 

 

17)  Does your school purchase computers or electronics that are Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT) certified?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe below.

Please indicate the portion of computer or electronics purchases that are EPEAT certified. Please provide the percentage of each product purchased that is EPEAT certified, where data are available. Note which products have been purchased in the “Product description” column (e.g., desktop computers, laptops).

 

 

 

Portion
EPEAT certified      

 

Percentage
EPEAT certified      

 

Product description (e.g. computers, printers)

Product 1

 

Some

 

 

IT awareness is just in the early recognition of EPEAT standards. Broader communication and Silver standard is the expectation.

Product 2

 

 

 

 

Product 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

FUNDING MECHANISMS

 

18)  What mechanisms does your school use to fund sustainability projects on campus? Check and describe all that apply. If no specific mechanisms are in place, indicate as such and move on to question 19.

Data collected for this question is for informational purposes only and will not be evaluated for grading.

 

[  ]  No specific mechanisms are in place.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[  ]

 

Alumni green fund

 

 

[X]

 

Capital budget

 

This is used to incorporate sustainability components into major and minor capital projects. New buildings projects are mandated to achieve LEED Gold certification. Major renewal/renovation projects must achieve LEED Silver as a minimum.

[  ]

 

Endowment investment in on-campus sustainability projects    

 

[X]

 

Operating budget

 

The CSO and USI operational costs are budgeted in the same manner as all other operational units at UBC (i.e. zero based budgeting). Energy and Water conservation projects are financed through tracking utility cost savings to the operational budget and using the savings to repay the associated loans. The retrofit project business case is submitted to the budget office for approval. Generally projects with a minimum financial payback of 10 years are considered (including finance costs).

[X]

 

Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects

 

Xerox sustainability fund - It was developed and launched as part of the sustainability coordinator program. Staff can apply with proposals on greening their work place. Fisher Scientific Fund - Two awards were given out to labs which submitted proposals to green their lab practices.

[  ]

 

Student green fee

 

 

[  ]    

 

Other. Please describe.

 

 

EMPLOYEE OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

19) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage sustainable behavioral change among departments, offices, faculty and staff? Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]

 

Departmental sustainability liaisons

 

UBC's Vancouver Campus: Sustainability Coordinators (http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sustainability-coordinators). UBC’s Sustainability Coordinators (SC) Program aims to engage and enable UBC employees to promote and implement sustainability practices and initiatives in their department. Now in its 11th year, the program includes a network of 150 staff sustainability coordinators who use 2 – 4 hours of paid work hours per month to inspire their colleagues to make environmentally sustainable behavioural changes in the workplace. These work hours are approved by UBC’s Board of Governors helping integrate sustainability into employee job descriptions. Energy conservation and greenhouse gas emissions reduction are two of the program’s 4 theme areas that SCs help to promote. According to a 2007 study, the energy conservation efforts of the Sustainability Coordinators save UBC $75,000 per year. UBC's Okanagan Campus: Greening Your Office - Greening Your Office luncheon was held May 18, 2010 in the Fipke Atrium. Over 40 UBC Okanagan campus faculty and staff participated in the event, learning about resource conservation, energy reduction, and other sustainable behaviours for the workplace and at home. This event generated a conversation about how we can further build awareness, capacity and actions to contribute to Sustainability. All who attended received a green gift bag filled with a variety of products, resources and tips for greening the office including desk plants, CFL light bulbs, recycled office supplies, biodegradable pens, reusable bags, and retractable clothes lines. In promoting waste reduction and locally sourced food, a healthy and garbage-less lunch was served featuring local farmers.

[  ]

 

Green office certification program

 

UBC's Okanagan Campus: development phase is currently underway for a green lab certification program seeking to recognize laboratory’s that are taking measures to reduce their carbon footprints.

[  ]

 

Green office tips posted online or on staff bulletin boards

 

Through the Sustainability Coordinator Program (UBC’s Sustainability Coordinators (SC) Program aims to engage and enable UBC employees to promote and implement sustainability practices and initiatives in their department) Lights-out stickers, lights-out posters, computer-off stickers, unplug stickers and energy conservation posters toolkits are available on website: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/campus-sustainability/getting-involved/sustainability-coordinators/sctoolkit

[  ]

 

Incorporation of sustainability issues into new employee orientation

 

UBC's Vancouver and Okanagan Campuses: Booth with sustainability materials and resources offered at quarterly new staff and faculty orientation

[  ]

 

Other

 

UBC’s Focus on People initiative (http://www.focusonpeople.ubc.ca/) to build a better work place has the following goals: • Developing a Sustainable, Healthy Workplace; • Retaining Staff and Faculty Through Positive ---Opportunities and Incentives;• Fostering Leadership and Management Practices; • Attracting Outstanding Talent to UBC; • Identifying and Sharing Institution-Wide Goals


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CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

Please note: Unless otherwise indicated, when providing data about greenhouse gas emissions levels, please provide data based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions. Scope 1 emissions refer to GHG emissions directly resulting from sources owned or operated by the institution (e.g. on-campus combustion of fossil fuels, emissions from campus vehicles). Scope 2 emissions refer to emissions generated indirectly due to the production of electricity that the institution consumes. Scope 3 emissions refer to all other indirect emissions that result from activities of the institution (e.g. employee travel).

 

GREENHOUSE GAS INVENTORY


20)Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?Please check all that apply.

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

[  ]  No
[]In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[X]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (Scopes 1 & 2, as well as scopes 1, 2 & 3 in metric tons of CO2e). Include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

 

 

Start Date         

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1 & 2)

 

Emissions level

(Scopes 1, 2 & 3)

 

URL          

 

Notes

2009

 

January 1 (Both campuses)

 

62548

 

123652

 

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/2009GHGInventorySummary.pdf

 

Vancouver and Okangan campuses included

2008

 

January 1 (Both campuses)

 

63774

 

123767

 

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/2008GHGInventorySummary.pdf

 

Vancouver and Okangan campuses included

2007

 

January 1 (Both campuses)

 

61743

 

121788

 

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/2007GHGInventorySummary.pdf

 

Vancouver and Okangan campuses included

2006

 

January 1 (Both campuses)

 

63845

 

122276

 

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sites/default/files/uploads/pdfs/2006GHGInventorySummary.pdf

 

Vancouver and Okangan campuses included

2005

 

 

 

 

,

 

 

 

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

 

21) Has your school made a commitment to reduce GHG emissions a specific amount by a target year?

The commitment should be to reducing actual campus greenhouse gas emissions, and does not include offsets or renewable energy credits (purchase of RECs is addressed in question 31). For example, if the university is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2030, and aims to do so by reducing campus emissions by 50 percent and buying offsets for the remaining 50 percent, you would indicate “50%” as the reduction level.

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Reduction level (percentage): 33

Baseline year:  2007

Baseline emissions level:  60976

Target year: 2015

 

Additional comments:  The baseline and targets include Scope 1, Scope 2 and paper, for the Vancouver campus only. Future targets are 67% reduction by 2020 and 100% reduction by 2050.

 

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

22) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions? Answer should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Please indicate whether your school has achieved actual reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This does not include the purchase of carbon offsets or renewable energy credits. (Purchase of RECs is considered in question 31.)

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

 

Percentage reduced: 4

Baseline year: 2000

Baseline emissions level: 64153

Year achieved:2007

 

Additional comments: The baseline and reduction include Scope 1 & 2 absolute emissions (not growth-adjusted) for both campuses. During this time, floor space increased by 20%.

 

 

23) Please provide GHG emissions figures in terms of gross square feet on campus for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.
Per-gross-square-foot emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

0.00434

2008:

 

0.00452

2007:

 

0.00439

2006:

 

0.00454

2005:

 

 


24) Please provide GHG emissions figures per full-time student equivalent for the past four years. Answers should be based on scopes 1 & 2 emissions.

Per full-time student equivalent emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time equivalent students.

 

The year the inventory was started (rather than ended) should be the year of the inventory. For example, if you began an inventory in June 2008, this would be your 2008 inventory.

 

 

 

2009:

 

1.36

2008:

 

1.46

2007:

 

1.48

2006:

 

1.57

2005:

 

 

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY                                                 

 

25) Has your school achieved a reduction in building energy consumption compared to a 2005 baseline?

Yes


If yes, please list details below.

Data must be provided in terms of MBtus (one thousand British thermal units).

2005 baseline year
Building energy consumption:
  1683891
Gross square feet of building space:  13308330

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)

Building energy consumption: 1610692

Gross square feet of building space:  13366760

26) Please indicate which programs or technologies your school has implemented to improve energy efficiency since 2000. Check all that apply.
[  ]    Cogeneration

[ X ]    Temperature setbacks

[ X]    Steam trap systems

 

For the following technologies and programs, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which they have been implemented.

 

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space

[  ]

 

Back pressure turbines

 

0

[X]

 

Economizers

 

71

[X]

 

Energy management system; building automation system, energy information system, or monitoring-based commissioning (MBCx) system

 

53

[X]

 

Gas-fired hydronic heating systems

 

87

[X]

 

Heat recovery systems

 

17

[X]

 

LED lighting

 

100

[X]

 

Lighting sensors

 

13

[  ]

 

Metering—chilled water

 

[X]

 

Metering—electric

 

93

[X]

 

Metering—steam

 

81

[X]

 

Other energy-efficient lighting (e.g. T5 or T8)

 

100

[X]

 

Performing system tune-ups

 

57

[X]

 

Retrocommissioning of HVAC systems (buildings must have been commissioned, retrocommissioned or re-commissioned within the last 10 years)

 

57

[  ]

 

Steam turbines

 

[X]

 

Steam-line insulation

 

100

[  ]

 

Timers for temperature control

 

[X]

 

Variable speed drives

 

57

[  ]

 

Vending machine sensors

 

 

[X]

 

Other. Please describe below.

 

See note .

 

Description: Sustainability Coordinators provide information to colleagues on reducing energy use by addressing lighting, computers, and phantom power.

 


27) What programs does your school facilitate that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use? Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

Audits or investigations of individual energy use 

[  ]

 

Cash incentives for energy reductions among departments

[X]

 

Energy monitoring website or dashboard displays for buildings

[X]

 

Energy reduction competitions among departments and/or offices

[  ]

 

Fume hoods in science buildings

[X]

 

Green IT policies (e.g. enabling power management)

[X]

 

PR campaigns (increased/innovative signage, newsletters, slogans, saturation), demonstrations to raise awareness, pledge drives    

[  ]

 

Trade-in or rebate programs for inefficient appliances (e.g. CFLs, refrigerators)

[X]

 

Other. Please describe: Sustainability Coordinators provide information to colleagues on reducing energy use by addressing lighting, computers, and phantom power  (0)                                                            

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

 

28) Does your school generate renewable energy?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please check all types of renewable energy that are generated, and provide data on the percentage of your total energy consumption fulfilled by each renewable source listed. If less than one percent is fulfilled by a given source, leave percent box blank. For each type of renewable energy, please describe the production source.

 

 

 

Renewable
energy type

 

Percent of
total energy
consumption    

 

Production
source description

[  ]

 

Biomass

 

 

[  ]

 

Concentrated solar power

 

 

[X ]

 

Geothermal (shallow depth)

 

 

Groundwater geoexchange heating and cooling

[  ]

 

Low-impact hydropower

 

 

[X]

 

Photovoltaics

 

 

PV panels on one building

[  ]

 

Wind

 

 

[  ]

 

Other. Please specify below.    

 

 

 

Other description:


29) Does your school have solar hot water systems?

No

 

If yes, please specify number of systems and total MBtus generated annually, if available.

 

Number of systems:

Total MBtus generated annually:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

 

30) What is the fuel mix of electricity purchased from the grid for your campus? Please provide the percentage for each source.

If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy source

 

Percent of total energy purchase

Coal

 

 

Natural Gas

 

9

Nuclear

 

 

Petroleum

 

Renewables (biomass, solar, wind, low-impact hydropower, photovoltaics, geothermal)      

 

13

Other. Please specify: large hydroelectric

 

78

large Hydroelectric

Percentage of overall electricity consumption purchased from the grid: 100


31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e Certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standards.

No

 

If yes, please describe below.

Date of most recent purchase: 
Length of contract: 
Average annual quantity (kWh): 
Average percentage of your total annual electric energy use that it represents: 

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

 

32) Please provide total MBtus of energy for heating and cooling generated annually from on-site combustion:

1072389

 

33) Please list each fuel source used in on-site combustion for heating and cooling, and note the percentage of overall BTUs derived from that source:
If less than one percent of a source is purchased, leave the percent box blank.

 

Energy Source    

 

Percent of overall BTUs   

Biomass

 

Coal

 

Geothermal

 

Natural gas

 

98

Petroleum

 

2

Other. Please specify:

 

     

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FOOD & RECYCLING

Please note: The food portion of this category and information about waste reduction in dining services is covered in a separate dining survey.

 

WASTE REDUCTION

 

34) Please provide the following information pertaining to trends in waste generation per weighted campus user.

2005 baseline year

Weighted campus users:  39534
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):  Method of calculation has changed. Therefore comparison between 2005/2006 and 2009/2010 is not appropriate.

 

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
 43658
Total waste generated (garbage + recycling + compost):  5642.95 in tonnes (2009/2010) ((Please note: only data for UBC's Vancouver campus available for waste)

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

 

35) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles. Check all that apply.

[  ]

 

None

[X]

 

Aluminum

[X]

 

Cardboard

[X]

 

Glass

[X]

 

Paper

[  ]

 

Plastics (all)

[X]

 

Plastics (some)

[X]

 

Other. Please list:     juice boxes

 

36) Please indicate the campus-wide diversion rate of recyclable waste from traditional disposal.

The diversion rate should be calculated based on the diversion of traditional recyclables (paper, plastics, aluminum, cardboard, glass). Please do not include recycled electronic waste, recycled construction waste, or composted food and landscaping waste in the calculation of this figure.

The diversion rate is equal to the (total amount of traditional recycled materials) divided by the (total amount of landfill waste plus the total amount of traditional recycled materials).

43.62% (note: this excludes construction and demolition wastes)

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE


37) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Please indicate recycling of the following items is available for students (through receptacles on campus, recycling drives, or other means), and/or for institutional electronics waste. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

For waste generated by students  

 

For waste generated by the institution

Batteries

 

[X]

 

[X]

Cell phones

 

[X]

 

[X]

Computers

 

[X]

 

[X]

Light bulbs

 

[X]

 

[X]

Printer cartridges

 

[X]

 

[X]

Other E-waste. Please list items:

 

[X]

 

[X]

Digitech Laser (a Vancouver based company that re-manufactures used laser printer cartridges) is doing a regular Cartridge Round-Up to pick up used ink and laser toner cartridges free for proper recycling.



If possible, describe the organization and/or company you are using to collect your e-waste for recycling, and the environmental and social safeguards that they take in disposal:

UBC Waste Management takes campus e-waste to Encorp Pacific (Canada) for recycling of 'Stewardship Program items' (see below), and to E-cycle Solutions for recycling of 'non-Stewardship Program items'. Encorp Pacific processes e-waste to reclaim raw materials such as glass, metals, and plastics, with all recycling operations taking place in Canada. For more information on their recycling process, please visit: 'The Electronics Recycling Process'. E-Cycle Solutions is an e-waste recycler that works under the ESABC Stewardship Program, with the ability to recycle electronic items that cannot be recycled through Encorp Pacific. (See http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/ewaste.htm)

 

COMPOSTING (APART FROM DINING FACILITIES)


38) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%


39) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

[X]  

 

Academic buildings

[X]  

 

Offices

[X]  

 

Outdoors

[X]  

 

Residence halls

 

Description:

There are also fifteen participating residential buildings in the University Neighbourhood Association (UNA) part of a joint UNA/UBC Composting Project comprising more than 1000 households. (http://www.myuna.ca/services/waste-disposal/composting-service/) 70% of UBC's waste stream can be composted or recycled. UBC produces about 1900 tonnes of compostable waste each year including: food waste, residual paper products, animal bedding, animal waste, wood, yard waste and sawdust (http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/compost.htm). UBC boasts Canada’s first university in-vessel composter, which has been in operation at UBC's Vancouver Campus since 2004. By digesting up to 240 tonnes of waste a year, the composter turns organic waste into nutrient-rich soil that is used to enhance landscaping on campus. As of this year, Food Services provide biodegradable hot beverage cups, plates, and napkins as well as organic waste collection bins in all of its outlets across campus. Furthermore, customers receive a 15-cent discount if they use their own mug or food container. Since its launch in 2003, the One Less Cup initiative has resulted in a 20 per cent reduction in paper cups annually. In addition, UBC Waste Management captures and recycles more than 36 tonnes of electronic waste annually under B.C.’s Electronic Product Stewardship Plan, which ensures that all e-waste is recycled in North America in a responsible manner. Overall, UBC diverts approximately 45 per cent (1678 tons) of its waste into recycling and composting programs, again this excludes construction and demolition waste.

 

 

SOURCE REDUCTION


40) Does your campus run any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all of the programs below that are in place at your institution:

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Limited printing

 

Promoted through the Sustainability Coordinators (http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sustainability-coordinators)

[  ]  

 

Move-in waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Move-out waste reduction

 

 

[X]  

 

Year-round materials exchange programs      

 

1. UBC Online Surplus Equipment Reuse Proposal. In 2009/10, the Campus Sustainability Office worked collaboratively with Building Operations and Supply Management to create a proposal for an online furniture reuse system that would better help to facilitate the reuse of furniture and other low-end value surplus equipment on campus. The proposal included: A SEEDS student research project developed by 5 MBA students which analyzed the feasibility of an enhanced furniture reuse system on campus. A business case developed by the Campus Sustainability Office that seeks funding for an official online reuse program. The previous reuse system, SERF (UBC’s surplus equipment recycling facility) closed due to operational costs being higher than revenue. However, there remains a strong interest in reuse on campus and since SERF’s closure, UBC has managed an informal reuse system through the UBC moving crew. This involves storing and re-distributing surplus supplies and office furniture on campus and includes equipment such as desks, chairs, tables, bookshelves and filing cabinets (see http://www.serf.ubc.ca/EIS/Serf/index.htm). The findings of the business case show that an easy-to-use, low-cost online system will help to better facilitate reuse between departments and student groups on campus and will help reduce the need for a fixed warehouse space. A 1-year pilot is expected to be launched in September 2010 by UBC Supply Management in collaboration with the UBC moving crew. In addition, Supply Management is exploring the feasibility of sending outdated and older furniture to a local furniture manufacturer for refurbishment and deconstruction for new furniture products. 2. HSE Chemical Exchange Program. The Chemical Exchange Program was developed to identify chemicals on campus that are no longer of use to the original user and divert them from disposal. Instead, these chemicals are tracked and marketed to other potential users on campus. This is a free service provided to the campus and not only reduces purchasing costs, but also reduces disposal costs. In 2007, approximately 640 kg of chemicals were exchanged in 60 transactions within UBC's Vancouver Campus.

[X]  

 

Other

 

1. UBC Sustainable Purchasing Guide: The UBC Sustainable Purchasing Guide is co-produced by the Campus Sustainability Office and UBC Supply Management. The guide is available as an online document to students, staff and faculty to promote sustainable purchasing. The guide advocates first and foremost for an assessment of whether a product or service is truly needed. Various source reduction recommendations and initiatives outlined in the 2nd edition of the UBC Sustainable Purchasing Guide include: -Videoconferencing and web conferencing as alternatives to business travel for meetings and/or conferences. Videoconferencing is free to UBC staff and faculty at both UBC's Vancouver and UBC's Okanagan Campus; -Promotion of reusable tote programs by UBC preferred vendors to reduce the amount of packaging sent to UBC. For instance, the UBC/Acklands Grainger reusable tote program saves 3400lbs of packaging from going into the landfill each year; -Promotion of reusable dishware for catered events. UBC’s student society, Alma Mater Society offers non-disposable dishware for on campus catered events; - Raising awareness that all on campus caterers offer bulk condiments (eg: honey, ketchup, sugar, milk/cream) rather than individually packaged items; -Promotion of sustainable events that: o are paperless (powerpoints, PDFs sent to participants);• use reused badges and lanyards. 2. Xerox Document Management Strategy. UBC will cut its paper waste by an estimated 26 per cent and save at least $8 million over the next six years with a new initiative for improved document management and print services across some of its departments. The contract was signed by the UBC administration in December 2009. The enterprise print services strategy, a $40-million, six-year project in partnership with Xerox Canada Inc. will focus on operating cost reduction, a continued commitment to sustainability, improvements to information management, and better customer service for delivery of large documents and equipment maintenance. 3. Bring your own mug/container discount. All food outlets on campus offer students, staff and faculty a 15 cent discount if they bring their own beverage mug or food container.


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GREEN BUILDING

 

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION


41) Does your school have a formal green building policy pertaining to design and construction for new buildings and major renovations?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Institutional Construction: LEED Gold is mandatory • As per Province of British Columbia requirements, all publicly owned new construction and major renovations must be LEED Gold certified: http://www.energyplan.gov.bc.ca/efficiency/PDF/EEBS-2008-Web.pdf •UBC has completed a new comprehensive campus plan. Sustainability is a major value for UBC and as such, it is incorporated throughout the plan. The plan serves to integrate buildings, infrastructure and landscape systems into a more compact, livable and sustainable whole. Detailed sections such as the Design Guidelines include specific instructions for how LEED is to be implemented on campus, to ensure achievement of campus sustainability goals in all new construction/major renovations. http://www.campusplan.ubc.ca/ • All institutional construction must also comply with the UBC Technical Guidelines, which incorporates additional sustainability requirements: http://www.technicalguidelines.ubc.ca/technical/sustainability.html Residential Construction: REAP Silver is mandatory • UTown@UBC represents UBC’s vision for a university community in which living, working and learning can flourish in an integrated, sustainable environment. http://planning.ubc.ca/utown__ubc/. All residential construction in UTown neighbourhoods must comply with REAP, UBC’s Residential Environmental Assessment Program: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/campus-sustainability/greening-the-campus/residential-environmental-assessment-program UBC developed REAP to answer the need for a rating system that could be used on all types of residential construction planned for the campus.

 


42) Please provide the following information about LEED-certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-certified buildings: 2

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:      

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level   

 

  

 

Silver-level

 

 

 

Gold-level

 

607986

 

Life Sciences Centre; Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory

Platinum-level   

 

 

 

43) Please provide information about campus buildings that meet LEED certification criteria, but are not certified.

Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria: 13

 

 

 

Combined gross square footage:    

 

Building name(s):

Certified-level criteria met, but not certified

 

 

 

 

Silver-level criteria met, but not certified

 

1119673  

 

Not registered but we can claim Silver ‘equivalency’: Institute for Computing, Information and Cognitive Systems (ICICS), IK Barber Learning Centre, Michael Smith, Facility for Proteomics, Sauder School of Business, Meekison Centre, Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre and Chemistry North renovation, Old Auditorium Renovation,D.H. Copp Renovation. Registered with CaGBC and are targeting Silver: Chemistry Centre, Buchanan Complex

Gold-level criteria met, but not certified

 

   152000

 

Registered with CaGBC and targeting Gold: Biological Sciences.

Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified   

 

   22400

 

Centre for Engineering Design

 

44) Please provide information about buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings:  
0
Combined gross square footage:
Building names:

 

45) Please provide information about buildings on your campus that meet the standards of other third-party green building certifications (e.g. Green Globes).

Certification type:
 
Total number of buildings:
  0  
Combined gross square footage: 

Building names: 

 

46) For the 2009-2010 academic year, what percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste was diverted from landfills?

50% institutional, 75% residential

 

ADAPTIVE REUSE

 

47) Please provide information about adaptive reuse projects your campus has completed since the year 2000.

Total number of adaptive reuse projects completed since the year 2000:   6


Please provide additional details for up to ten of the most comprehensive projects:

 

Project name     

 

Square footage  

 

Former use       

 

Current use      

 

Additional details

Faculty of Graduate Studies

 

668 sm

 

Reuse of old cafeteria food service level of Thea Koerner House

 

Faculty of Graduate Studies Admin Offices

 

Dorothy Somerset Studios

 

2429 sm

 

Storage Hut

 

Theatre and Teaching Studios

 

BC Binning Studios

 

1676 sm

 

Storage Hut

 

Art Teaching Studios

 

University Centre Lower Level Classrooms

 

762 sm

 

Abandoned Basement

 

Classrooms

 

School of Public and Population Health

 

8414 sm

 

Library Processing

 

Academic

 

The Barn

 

417 sm

 

Agricultural and Food Service

 

Daycare

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


48) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus in the 2000-2001 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE):  30505 (UBC Vancouver campus)

Square footage:  11674770 (UBC Okanagan campus did not exist in 2000-2001)

 

49) Please provide the student enrollment and gross square footage of buildings on campus for the 2009-2010 academic year.

 

Student enrollment (FTE): 46106 (both campuses)

Square footage: 13366760 UBC Vancouver campus, combined both campuses: 14420224

 

OPERATIONS AND MAINTENANCE


50) Does your school have a formal green building policy specifically pertaining to operations and maintenance?

Yes

 

If yes, please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Energy Policy It is the policy of the University of British Columbia Land and Building Operations to manage all of its operations so as to ensure that the consumption of energy and water occur in the most sustainable manner possible while providing an environment that encourages learning, teaching and research. Hazardous Materials Management Policy(http://www.universitycounsel.ubc.ca/policies/policy9.pdf) Background & Purposes: As a large teaching and research institution, UBC faces problems that are unique and varied about the acquisition, handling, storage, transportation and disposal of chemical and biological/human/animal materials and wastes resulting from its teaching, research, and operations. This policy has several purposes: • to set out University requirements for proper disposal of hazardous and special wastes; • to ensure worker protection; • to reduce the amount of dangerous substances used in University activities; • to raise awareness and increase knowledge of all members of the University community about problems of handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous materials and waste; • to establish good laboratory practices that teach and practice safe handling, storage, transportation and disposal of special wastes; and • to ensure compliance with applicable legislation.

 


51) Please provide the following information about LEED-EB certified buildings on your campus:

Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings:  0
Combined gross square footage: 
Building names:

 

52) Please provide the following information about buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified:

Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified: 6
Combined gross square footage:  325474
Building names: BOMA BEST Certification achieved for the Neville Scarfe Complex (5 buildings) and Buchanan Tower (1 building)

 

WATER MANAGEMENT

 

53) Has your institution reduced its water consumption per weighted campus user, as compared to a 2005 baseline?
Weighted campus users = (1 * number of on-campus residents) + (0.75 * number of non-residential or commuter full-time students, faculty and staff members) + (0.5 * number of non-residential or commuter part-time students, faculty, and staff members).

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the following information:

2005 baseline year
Weighted campus users:
  39534
Water consumed (gallons):  1031393681

Performance year (most recent year for which data are available)
Weighted campus users:
  43658

Water consumed (gallons):  891139153 (Please note: only data for UBC's Vancouver Campus available for water)

 

54) Please indicate which of the following water-conservation technologies have been installed in existing buildings on campus. Check all that apply. For each item, please indicate the percentage of possible campus building space in which the technology has been installed.

For example, if dual-flush toilets have been installed in all bathrooms on campus, you would indicate “100” as the percentage of building space in which the technology has been installed.

 

 

 

 

Percentage of building space     

[X]  

 

Building water metering

 

42

[X]  

 

Dual-flush toilets

 

less than 5%

[X]  

 

Gray water systems

 

[  ]  

 

Laundry technology

 

100%

[  ]  

 

Leak detection and reduction  

 

 

[X]  

 

Low-flow faucets

 

74

[X]  

 

Low-flow showerheads

 

74

[  ]  

 

Non-potable water usage

 

[  ]  

 

Waterless urinals

 

[X]  

 

Xeriscaping

 

 

[X]  

 

Weather-informed irrigation

 

 

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe below.  

 

 

Other description:  Composting toilets and urinals are used in one building allowing it to be independent of the sewer system. In 74% of the campus, continually flushing urinals were replaced with motion sensor technology.

 

 

55) What stormwater management technologies or strategies are used on your campus?

[X]

 

Living or vegetated roofs  

[  ]

 

Porous pavement

[X]

 

Retention ponds

[X]

 

Stone swales

[X]

 

Vegetated swales

[X]

 

Other. Please describe:
deep aquifer infusion of sand filtered stormwater, rain gardens, curb bulges 

 

ENERGY MANAGEMENT

Information concerning energy management will be drawn from question 26 (Climate Change & Energy). If you wish to provide any additional information about energy-efficiency technologies installed in campus buildings, please attach it in a supplemental document at the end of the survey.


Back to top

 

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

 

56) Please list sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school.

 A sustainability-themed residential community is created specifically to provide students with a living-and-learning experience focused on sustainability.  Students must have actively selected or applied to live in the residence. Example: Synergy House at Colorado College.

 

For each sustainability-themed residential community, please provide the following information:

 

Name of program     

 

Type of community     

 

Number of students involved     

 

Additional details

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION


57) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

Yes

 

If yes, please check and describe all ways in which sustainability is incorporated into new student orientation:

[  ]  

 

Skits, speakers, or presentations that take place in large venues that most or all first-year students attend. Topics must include at least one of the following: promoting the Office of Sustainability, student campus sustainability groups, or sustainability as an important campus issue.

[  ]  

 

Incorporating sustainability information into presentations made by RAs to individual hallways.

[  ]  

 

Active engagement of students in activities that raise awareness about sustainability, highlight how sustainability occurs on campus, or in which students take part in a productive activity, such as volunteer work or projects (e.g., working in the on-campus garden).

[  ]  

 

Making orientation more sustainable through efforts such as a zero-waste meal or carbon offsets.

[X]  

 

Other. Please describe:

 Imagine Orientation Event The UBC Sustainability Office works to integrate sustainability into student, staff and faculty orientations. For students, we provide information at their two major annual orientation events (Imagine and GALA) and useful resources, such as our sustainable event protocol. Each year, the Main Event Carnival is the centerpiece of the Imagine student orientations, an event which showcases campus life to over 5000 new students. Over 250 booths line Main Mall to promote their activities and initiatives and the landscape is full with campus groups and information for new students. In 2009, the Campus Sustainability Office organized and launched the “Green Lounge” for UBC’s Imagine orientation event. The purpose of the event was to make sustainability a visible piece at Imagine’s busy “Main Event Carnival”. The Campus Sustainability Office collaborated with Imagine staff to create a sustainability specific section that showcased 21 sustainability related student groups and campus departments. Interactive activities included: • A ‘lounge’ area set up with used couches and coffee tables for students to relax and meet upper year students involved in sustainability. • Music powered by a solar-powered generator • Sustainability related booths (21 in total) which were there to raise awareness about sustainability related initiatives and practices on campus (eg: composting, recycling, energy conservation) and student-led sustainability clubs • Unified look and feel (“Green Lounge” signage, buttons) • Pedal powered smoothie maker • Free snacks from the Alma Mater Society catering using ingredients from the UBC Farm The 2009 Green Lounge presented a unified sustainability presence at the Imagine main event carnival. Student groups received record club and list serve sign ups. In previous years, sustainability related booths were positioned at different locations along the main event carnival and had difficulty in attracting new students to their booths. 2. GALA Orientation Event The GALA event is UBC’s orientation event for international students. At the 2009 GALA event, the Campus Sustainability Office organized a ‘waste toss’ activity to demonstrate proper waste diversion at UBC. CSO interns led the activity which involved tossing various labeled hacky sacks into the correct waste bins (eg: banana peel into the green compost bin; plastic drink bottles into the gray beverage container bin). Over 500 international students visited the CSO booth in 2009.

 

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES


58) Does your school offer on-campus, office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students during the academic year?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide the number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student below.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:    

Paid positions

 

20

 

10 hours/week during the school year, and 20 hours – 35 hours/week during the summer term (May – August). Interns work in the UBC Sustainability Office, TREK Transportation Demand Management Program Centre, UBC Alma Mater Society, Waste Management, Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth, the University Sustainability Initiative (Teaching and Learning Office) and Student Housing and Hospitality Services.

Unpaid positions

 

 

 

 


59) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or a similar program to promote behavioral change on campus?

 

If yes, please provide the URL to the program's website. If not, select “no.”

http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/campus-sustainability/getting-involved/residence-sustainability-coordinators 

 

Please provide the following details about the number of students involved in program, their average working hours, and any compensation that they receive.

 

 

 

Number of students:     

 

Average hours worked weekly per student:

Paid positions.

 

2

 

10 hours per week from September-April

Positions that award academic credit.  

 

0

 

0

Uncompensated positions.

 

25

 

2-3 hours/week

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

 

60) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

Yes, one competition.

 

For each competition or challenge that is run on campus, please provide the details requested. You may provide detailed information for up to three competitions.

 

First Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name: goBeyond challenge

Year Initiated: 2009

Website: http://www.go-beyond.ca

 

Frequency that competition is run:  Once annually

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

Participants in the competition:

[X]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe:   approximately 2000 participants on 12 campuses across British Columbia, including UBC Vancouver and Okanagan Campuses

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[X]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

peer-to-peer marketing via carbon calculator face-book application, ‘swag’ (buttons, water bottles etc.)

[  ]  

 

Other

 

A sense of ownership and stewardship

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

see text box below

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]

 

Water conservation  

 

[X]  

 

Other

 

educate, engage, inspire and support students to make carbon-smart lifestyle choices individually, and within their communities

 

Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  not quantified

 

Lasting effects of competition:  Engagement within the broader scope of the goBEYOND project, which trains students to reduce their carbon footprint and support their community in doing the same. 100 UBC students took the challenge in the 2009/2010 school year. Website: http://www.go-beyond.ca

 

Additional Information:  The UBC Campus Sustainability Office is also currently planning a dorm energy conservation competition set for the November 2010 “Campus Conservation Nationals”. The UBC Board of Governors endorsed the competition in March 2010 as a way to promote a culture of conservation to new students at UBC. Planning started in April 2010 and committee members currently include staff and volunteers from the Campus Sustainability Office, Student Housing and Hospitality Services, Residence Life, goBeyond (provincial student-run project) and Common Energy UBC (student group). The competition will be co-created by the UBC administration (UBC staff) and UBC residence students.

 

Second Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:

Year Initiated:

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run: 

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

 

[  ]

 

Faculty

 

[  ]

 

Staff

 

[  ]

 

Administrators

 

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.  

 

 

Participants in the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:  

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition: 

Lasting effects of competition: 

Additional Information: 

 

Third Competition:

 

Competition Overview

 

Competition Name:

Year Initiated:

Website:

 

Frequency that competition is run:

 

Groups involved in coordinating the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, please describe.

   

 

Participants in the competition:

[  ]

 

Students

[  ]

 

Faculty

[  ]

 

Staff

[  ]

 

Administrators

[  ]

 

Other, describe:

 

Incentives for participation:

 

 

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Cash

 

[  ]  

 

Non-monetary prizes

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

Goals of competition:

 

 

Describe:

[  ]  

 

Energy conservation  

 

[  ]  

 

Waste reduction

 

[  ]  

 

Water conservation

 

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Percent of energy and/or resource use reduction resulting from the competition:  

Lasting effects of competition:  

Additional Information:  

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS


61) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs for the organizations’ websites, if available:

Name

 

Description

 

URL

AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy

 

The UBC Alma Mater Society (AMS) recognizes the ecological crisis that humanity faces and the special responsibility universities and university students have in finding and implementing solutions. The creation of the AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy in 2008 provides a framework for walking the talk. From local food security, responsible consumption, and a youth climate action coalition to a water bottle-free campus campaign, community-based social marketing and the Natural Step Framework, the Lighter Footprint Strategy initiative showcases the many faces of sustainability, strives to build stronger campus sustainability networks and fosters sustainable behavior change in everyday life.

 

http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/student_government/subpage/category/ams_lighter_footprint_strategy/

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainability Working Group, Institute of Mining Engineering

 

Environmental and social issues have become increasingly important in the mining industry, a fact recognized by the Faculty and students in Mining Engineering. The Sustainability Working Group (SWG) uses a cooperative team leadership approach. Graduate student members of the group are from a variety of disciplinary and experiential backgrounds.

 

http://www.mining.ubc.ca/SWG.html

 

 

 

 

 

Net Impact, Sauder Chapter

 

Net Impact is a worldwide network of MBAs, graduate students, and professionals who are committed to using business for a positive social, environmental, and economic impact. The Net Impact chapter at UBC’s Sauder School of Business currently has are dedicated to the pursuit of sustainability education outside of the MBA classroom with approximately 30 members.

 

www.mbasociety.ca/netimpact

 

 

 

 

 

Common Energy, UBC Chapter

 

Common Energy UBC is a student-led organization whose mission is to bring UBC beyond climate neutral. Common Energy envisions a campus that does more to solve the climate crisis than it does to cause it. Common Energy has a proven history of success and is continually adapting to achieve its vision. They currently have five subgroups–Challenges, Education, International, Dialogue and Tangible Solutions–working in dynamic ways for a beyond climate neutral campus.

 

http://www.campusclimatenetwork.org/wiki/Welcome

 

 

 

 

 

Student Environment Centre (SEC)

 

SEC is a resource group mandated by the Alma Mater Society for people within the UBC Community who are concerned, or would like to learn more about environmental problems and the broader issues of sustainability facing our planet. Volunteers provide environmental and sustainability resources to the UBC community and organize a number of events and projects like Buy Nothing Day and the UBC Sustainability Conference.

 

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/student_life/resource_groups/sec/

 

 

 

 

 

Biology Society

 

The Chemical and Biological Engineering (CHBE) Sustainability Club is made up of students and faculty who wish to serve as a model of sustainability for individual members and the University community. The main goal of the club is to foster a culture of sustainability in the department and on campus. This is achieved through Education, Academic Integration and Enhancement of department sustainability. The club organizes events, including movie nights, regular speaker series, field trips and large e-waste collection. The club also has a number of ongoing projects, including a bi-weekly newsletter, organic waste collection, e-waste collection and a departmental sustainability assessment.

http://www.chbe.ubc.ca/sustainability/

http://www.chbe.ubc.ca/sustainability/

 

 

 

 

 

CUS Sustainability, UBC Commerce

 

The Commerce Undergraduate Society (CUS) Sustainability's mission is to provide opportunities for Sauder School of Business students to educate themselves on what sustainability means in the context of business; to motivate students to integrate sustainability into their professional and personal lives; and to use the Commerce Undergraduate Society as a model for how sustainability can be implemented into the operations and strategic thinking of an organization. In only its second year of operation, CUS Sustainability has successfully hosted two Chasing Sustainability Conferences, which have brought together a diverse and engaged group of students, faculty, and members of Vancouver’s business community in an intimate, discussion-oriented setting aimed at educating students about the current paradigm shift affecting the business world. Through the efforts of CUS Sustainability, the Sauder School of Business is now offering a Business and Sustainability concentration.Regenesis is a grassroots environmental, social justice and humanitarian organization. We believe that a healthy planet and a healthy society are mutually dependent. Our ultimate goal is a fulfilling and sustainable living for all, so that our actions no longer tip the balance of the global ecosystem. In order to achieve this, we focus on real, comprehensive and practical solutions to today’s social and environmental concerns.

 

www.cussustainability.com

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental Science Students Association (ESSA)

 

The Environmental Science Students Association (ESSA) is the student club representing the environmental science program at UBC. ESSA organizes social events for students to get to know each other outside the classroom. They also put on academic conferences and discussions with professionals in the environmental sciences field, as well as study groups for the program's core courses. The association also takes part in events promoting public awareness of environmental issues.

 

www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/essa

 

 

 

 

 

Emerging Green Builders UBC

 

The UBC EGB will engage a robust interdisciplinary network of students, scholars, professors, practitioners, and administrators concerned with the future of the built environment. EGB intends to provide students and new professionals affordable resources for integrating green design in their studies and practice. Further, it is their mission to partake in advancing UBC and the Pacific Northwest as a global leader in sustainable design, development, and building

 

http://www.emerginggreenubc.ca/

 

 

 

 

 

Engineers without Borders UBC

 

Engineers Without Borders is dedicated to improving the livelihood of people in developing countries. We believe that people have great potential, and when provided with the opportunity, they are capable of bringing about tremendous change for themselves and their community. The UBC Chapter of Engineers Without Borders is just one of 27 (and counting) university chapters across the country.

 

http://ubc.ewb.ca/

 

 

 

 

 

Ancient Forest Committee (AFC)

 

Rallies and initiatives to conserve the forest

 

ubc.afc@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

The goBeyond project

 

Implemented by a network of student leaders from post-secondary schools across BC (including UBC) that seeks to educate, inspire, engage and support students in implementing climate action on their campuses

 

http://www.go-beyond.ca

 

 

 

 

 

Sprouts

 

A student-run volunteer organization at UBC that endeavors to make accessible the healthiest, most affordable, and most sustainably produced food on campus through a cafe, a grocery store, a bulk buying club, and a catering business

 

www.ubcsprouts.ca

 

 

 

 

 

Oxfam Canada at York University

 

Oxfam UBC is committed to developing innovative ways to support Oxfam's important aid and relief work, and to raising awareness of global poverty. Oxfam UBC helped to create UBC's Ethical Purchasing Policy Committee, which draws together representatives from the UBC Alma Mater Society, the administration, and Oxfam Canada, and is committed to the goal of a "No Sweat" campus. They also foster partnerships to host exciting events such as fundraiser dinners, film nights, concerts, rallies, Uneven Playing Field soccer games, and workshops.

 

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=48374563870&ref=

 

 

 

 

 

UBC Food Society Club

 

A community of hungry people who want to discover and adventure food at UBC and in Vancouver. They come together at least once a month to eat well, learn to cook, and learn other wonderful ways food impacts our lives

 

http://www.ubcfoodsociety.com/

 

 

 

 

 

Social Justice Centre

 

A resource group of the AMS set out to abolish socio-economic inequalities that exist both globally and in our communities

 

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/student_life/resource_groups/social_justice/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

Friends of the Farm

 

Friends of the UBC Farm (FotF) is a group open to both students (as a UBC Alma Mater Society club) and the wider community. Their mission is to support the Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at the UBC Farm by increasing awareness about the value of the UBC Farm and its education, research and community outreach programs at UBC and wider communities. In 2009/10, FotF worked to support the successful adoption of the Sustainability Academic Strategy and the South Campus Academic Plan, which outline the long-term future for the farm. The club also organized fun workshops and events at the farm, and raised awareness about the farm through our presence at outreach events throughout the city.

 

www.friendsoftheubcfarm.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 

 

Agents of Change

 

The UBC chapter of a registered non-profit dedicated to youth engagement and sustainable solutions to global poverty.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agricultural Undergraduate Society

 

The Agriculture Undergrad Society (AGUS) is a student-run organization committed to building a sense of community within the Faculty of Land and Food Systems. From growing and harvesting to cooking and eating, the faculty knows all about food and understands the unique ability food has to bring people together. The AGUS knows that students may not always have the means or time to cook nutritious meals for themselves. With this in mind, every week AGUS members plan, shop for and prepare dinner for students, faculty and staff. The dinners have grown in popularity, and now the AGUS serves meals for upwards of 100 people each week. The menu focuses around local seasonal food and tries to uses produce from the UBC Farm and the Faculty of Land and Food Systems Orchard Garden when available. Food is at the heart of all Faculty of Land and Food Systems members, and it is what they do best!

 

blogs.landfood.ubc.ca/agus

 

 

 

 

 


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TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

 

62) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?
The fleet includes all vehicles owned by the campus such as cars, trucks, and carts. It does not include lawnmowers or other off-road vehicles.

332 UBC Okanagan campus’ fleet: includes 15 standard vehicles and 25 non-standard vehicles (3 of which are electric).

 

63) Please indicate which of the following alternative-fuel vehicles are included in your fleet. Check all that apply. Please list the number of vehicles for each class.

 

 

 

 

Number of vehicles

[X]  

 

100 percent electric

 

20

[X]  

 

Diesel-electric hybrid

 

1

[X]  

 

Fueled with B20 or higher biofuel for more than 6 months of the year

 

41

[  ]  

 

Fueled with E85 or higher ethanol for more than 6 months of the year    

 

0

[X]  

 

Gasoline-electric hybrid

 

                     4

[  ]  

 

Hydrogen fueled

 

[  ]  

 

Plug-in hybrid

 

1 Prius Plug-In Electric Hybrid

[  ]  

 

Other. Please describe:

2 Natural gas buses for campus shuttles

 

 


COMMUTE MODAL SPLIT

64) What portion of the student body commutes via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool/vanpool)?

93

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of students who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

7

Carpool/vanpool

 

3

Public transit

 

66

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

7

Walking

 

10

 

65) What percentage of employees commute via transportation methods other than single-occupancy vehicles (e.g., bicycle, walking, public transportation, carpool)?

73

 

If data are available, please provide the percentage of employees who commute by each of the following means.

 

 

 

Percentage

Bicycle

 

14

Carpool/vanpool

 

9

Public transit

 

43

Single-occupancy vehicle    

 

27

Walking

 

4

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

 

66) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling to faculty, staff and/or students? Check all that apply, and describe below.

[  ] No

[X] Yes, to faculty and staff

[X] Yes, to students

 

Description:  UBC has partnered with two carpool organizations (Jack Bell Ride Share and Carpool.ca) that both offer free online ride matching services through web-based booking systems. UBC has its own web interface for Jack Bell Ride Share which is eligible for all members of the UBC community including students, staff, faculty, alumni, residents, and visitors.UBC Parking provide priority parking spots for high occupancy vehicles in the parkades.


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for faculty/staff. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Free online ride matching services through web-based booking systems

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Priority parking locations in parkades

[  ]  

 

Other

 


Please check and describe carpooling incentives provided for students. Check all that apply.

 

 

 

 

 

Description

[X]  

 

Carpool matching

 

Free online ride matching services through web-based booking systems

[  ]  

 

Financial remuneration  

 

[X]  

 

Preferential parking

 

Priority parking locations in parkades

[  ]  

 

Other

 

 

67) Does your school offer subsidies for the use of public transportation?

 

No

 

  

 

 

 

Eligible community members:

 

Size of the discount (as a percent of full price)

[  ]  

 

Faculty

 

[X]  

 

Staff

 

15

[X]  

 

Students   

 

85


[   ]  Check here if subsidy takes the form of pre-tax payroll deduction. Please describe below:

 

68) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

 

 

 If not applicable, please explain:  small campus with no thrugh roads

 

69) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

 

No

 

The University works with Cambie Corridor Consortium to provide a free shuttle bus service that travels between Vancouver General Hospital and UBC Hospital. The service is open to staff of the hospital only.

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

 

70) Does your school offer a bicycle sharing/rental program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.


Year created:  1998
Number of bikes available:  75 (variable)
Usage fee per hour:   
Usage fee per day:  

 

Annual membership fee for students:  $15

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators:  $20

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description: UBC’s Vancouver Campus: The AMS manages a bike share program, a rental program, and a full-service bike shop. (See AMS Bike Co-op, http://www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/bikecoop/). The bike share service was created in1998 and provides access to approximately 75 bicycles across the campus. Participation in the program requires membership with the AMS bike co-op. To become a member of the bike co-op, you must volunteer at the co-op for 6 hours, OR, you can pay $15 for students/ $20 for faculty, staff, and community members. With membership, and one night of volunteering at a Tuesday Purple & Yellow party from 6-9pm, you can get access to over 75 public bikes. The university runs a small bike and cargo trailer rental program free of charge to staff and students on campus. There are 7 bikes and 3 trailers, and 2 locations for pick up and return. UBC’s TREK Program Centre is currently exploring the feasibility of a large scale public bike system for the campus, based on the Public Bicycle System Company’s BIXI system. UBC's Okanagan Campus: UniCycle program provides the campus with an opportunity to borrow reclaimed and refurbished bikes as a sustainable way to get around campus. Program launch anticipated 2010.

 

71) Does your school offer bicycle repair services?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below:


Year created:  1998
Service fee: 
Description:  The Bike Kitchen is a project of the UBC Bike Co-op, with the support of the UBC Alma Mater Society and the Trek Program Centre. The Bike Kitchen is UBC's non-profit, student-owned, full-service bike shop. At the Bike Kitchen, people can purchase a fully refurbished and guaranteed used bicycle; donate their old bikes; fix bikes with tools; learn to fix their own bikes; get their bike fixed; and choose from a wide selection of new and used parts and accessories.

 

CAR SHARING PROGRAM

 

72) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

Yes

 

If yes, please provide details below.

Year created: 
Total number of vehicles: 
Number of hybrid vehicles:  
Usage fee per hour: 
Usage fee per day: 


Annual membership fee for students: 

Annual membership fee for faculty, staff, and administrators: 

Other annual membership fee: 

 

Description:

 

PLANNING

 

73) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

The University’s Campus Plan strives to create a pedestrian and cycling friendly environment. To achieve this, the 2005 Strategic Transportation Plan calls to maintain the pedestrian core on campus, restricting automobile access to emergency vehicles only. New Campus Plan guidelines prescribe the required end-of-trip facilities that must be included in any new development to support increased levels of cycling. We also have a 10 year capital plan to improve cycling facilities on campus and one for the pedestrian environment.

 

74) Do you offer the option of a condensed work week or telecommuting to at least ten percent of full-time employees? For each option, please indicate who is eligible.

 

 

 

 

Employees eligible

 

Description:

[X]  

 

Telecommuting

 

33%

 

HR has a tele-commuting guideline for Management and Professional staff available (about 3100 can use it, which is 1/3 of the entire staff, but only a small percentage are likely using the option because the policy was introduced only recently). It is at the discretion of the supervisor whether staff can tele-commute or not. Refer to: http://www.hr.ubc.ca/files/pdf/telecommuting/UBC_Telecommuting_Guidelines_M_P_Staff.pdf

[X]  

 

Condensed work week  

 

 

UBC functions in a decentralized manner so it is difficult to assess the number of staff who use flex time or tele-commute. Union staff have the opportunity to work flexible hours in some cases. An estimated 20% of unionized employees use this opportunity. It is up to the supervisor and depends on the job duties .

 

Additional comments:


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STATISTICS

 

75) Campus setting:       

University endowed land within Metro Vancouver. The Okanagan campus is located in a suburban/ruralarea less than 10 km from the city centre of Kelowna.

 

76) Total number of buildings on campus:

445

 

77) Combined gross square footage of all buildings on campus: 

14420224 (UBC's Vancouver and Okanagan Campus)

 

78) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

33209 + 4784 (UBC's Vancouver and Okanagan Campus combined): 37993

 

79) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate + graduate, headcount at start of academic year): 

13404 + 1320 (Vancouver and Okanagan Campus combined): 14724

 

80) Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 

26

 

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Question 81 is for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

81) Please check all items that apply to your institution:

 

 

 

 

 

Description (optional)

[X]    

 

Campus garden or farm

 

UBC Farm http://www.landfood.ubc.ca/ubcfarm/; UBC Okanagan Campus: campus learning garden

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]    

 

Disposable water bottle ban

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies major (undergraduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Environmental science/studies minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level environmental studies program (graduate-level)

 

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Graduate-level sustainability studies program

 

http://www.ires.ubc.ca/academic/index.html

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Outdoors club

 

UBC Okanagan Campus

 

 

 

 

 

[  ]     

 

Participation in Recyclemania

 

American program

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Single-stream recycling

 

Styrofoam UBC's Okanagan Campus

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Student trustee position

 

Students sit on Board of Governors: http://www.bog.ubc.ca/about/members.html

 

 

 

 

 

[X]    

 

Sustainability major, minor or concentration (undergraduate-level)   

 

A few at the undergraduate level (within the disciplines). http://sustain.ubc.ca/teaching-learning/curriculum/programsAmerican program

 


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