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Report Card 2010

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University of New Hampshire

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name: Sara Cleaves

Title: Associate Director, UNH Office of Sustainability

Date survey submitted: July 21, 2008 

 

ADMINISTRATION

 

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES

1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes. Please describe and provide URL, if available: www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/coreframework.html

 

2) Has the president of your institution signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes. If completed, please provide the date the GHG Report was submitted to the ACUPCC: September 12, 2008: http://www.aashe.org/pcc/reports/ghg-report.php?id=296 . Climate Action Plan to be submitted September 2009. UNH was the first land-grant in New England to sign the ACUPCC and one of the first 75 signers in general in 2007.

 

3) Has your institution signed the Talloires Declaration?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes

 

4) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan (check all that apply)?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: http://www.unh.edu/cmp/index.html

[ X]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: Both the UNH Academic Plan ( http://www.academicplan.unh.edu/ ; http://www.unh.edu/academic-affairs/pdf/academicplan.pdf ) and the strategic plan for UNH Cooperative Extension ( http://extension.unh.edu/AboutUs/StrPlan.pdf ) contain sustainability-related principles. UNH is now undergoing a university-wide strategic planning process, and sustainability is a prominent theme ( http://www.unh.edu/strategicplanning/workinggroupupdates_9.html ).

 

ADVISORY COUNCIL

5) Does your school have a council or committee that advises on and/or implements policies and programs related to sustainability?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes

If you answered "No" to question 5, please proceed directly to question 11.

 

6) Please provide the name of the committee and list the number of meetings held since August 2008.

UNH has many committees and groups that work on various aspects of sustainability, including but not limited to faculty and staff working groups and task forces around the University Office of Sustainability's four initiatives in biodiversity, climate (campus-wide Energy Task Force (ETF)), food and culture, two lands committees, a transportation policy committee, a Local Harvest (Dining) committee, a Green Cleaning Committee, an integrated waste management committee, and more. In addition, other committees – from the Academic Leadership Council ( the provost and provost office’s staff, deans, faculty and UNH’s chief sustainability officer) to the UNH President’s Cabinet (all vice presidents) to the Faculty and Student Senates – regularly discuss advancing sustainability at UNH.  Meeting schedules vary by working group, committee or task force.  For example, the Energy Task Force meets monthly during the academic year and 1-2 times in the summer months.  You can see its full membership list at http://www.unh.edu/etf/etfbasics.html . A mix of faculty, staff and students usually participate in all committees, working groups and task forces.

 

7) Please provide number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

Please see answer to #6.  Membership numbers vary by committee, task force or working group.  For example, the campus-wide Energy Task Force currently has 22-plus members, plus additional people participate in subcommittee work.  It’s a mix of administrators (2), faculty (7), staff (11), and students (2-4).

 

8) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents . If 2009-2010 academic year information is not yet available, please provide information for 2008-2009 instead.

Again, please see answer to #6.  Chairs vary by committee, working group or task force.  For example, the Transportation Policy Committee is chaired by the VP for Finance & Administration (administrator.)  The Energy Task Force is chaired by the Assistant Vice President for Energy and Campus Development (staff).  The Student Senate and its various subcommittees (many of which deal with sustainability, from education to town/gown relations to campus operations/infrastructure) are chaired by students.

 

9) To whom does the committee report (e.g., president, vice president)?

Again, please see answer to #6.  To whom a group reports varies by committee, working group or task force.  In general, all chairs of any group end up reporting to the UNH President, the UNH Provost, deans, faculty departmental chairs, the chief sustainability officer, the interim vice president of advancement, or elected Faculty Senate or Student Senate representatives like the student body president and vice president.  As a specific example, the Energy Task Force is chaired by the Assistant Vice President for Energy and Campus Development, who reports to the VP for Finance & Administration, who sits on the President’s Cabinet and reports to the UNH President.

 

10) Please list key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2008.

Since UNH has such a wide variety of committees, task forces, working groups, faculty or student senate bodies, and councils that address and advance sustainability across campus, naming their successes and work since 2008 would be challenging.

You can see UNH’s efforts in integrating sustainability across curriculum, operations, research and engagement (all of which are collaborative and involve the university’s many committees and other collective bodies) at:

As a specific example, Energy Task Force efforts can be found at www.unh.edu/etf .

 

SUSTAINABILITY STAFF

11) Does your school employ sustainability staff (excluding student employees and interns)?

[  ]  No

[X] Yes. Please provide titles and number of sustainability staff.

[ ~ 6.5   ]  Number of full-time staff (in FTE). Titles:

  • Chief sustainability officer and director of the University Office of Sustainability
  • Associate director, University Office of Sustainability
  • Program coordinator, Food & Society Initiative and Culture & Sustainability Initiative, University Office of Sustainability
  • Program coordinator, Biodiversity Education Initiative and Climate Education Initiative, University Office of Sustainability
  • Administrative assistant, Program coordinator, Food & Society Initiative and Culture & Sustainability Initiative, University Office of Sustainability
  • Staff who work full time in Energy & Campus Planning, Dining, Facilities, Office of the Provost, Environmental Health & Safety, and colleges/institutes/academic departments on campus to advance certain aspects of sustainability, from energy efficiency to transportation planning to diversity to service learning and more.

See www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/staff.html for University Office of Sustainability staffing.

[Too many to count; across campus administrators, faculty and staff are integrating sustainability into what they teach, research and do on campus]  Number of part-time staff (in FTE).  Examples include:

  • Special projects coordinator, Biodiversity Education Initiative and Climate Education Initiative, University Office of Sustainability
  • Special projects coordinator, Food & Society Initiative and Culture & Sustainability Initiative, University Office of Sustainability
  • NH Farm to School program manager
  • Natural Resources & Earth Systems Science PhD program coordinator
  • Dual Major in EcoGastronomy program coordinator (starting Aug/Sept 2009)
  • Faculty from every college and institute, and staff from across campus (from Purchasing to Dining, Human Resources to Student & Academic Affairs) are integrating sustainability into their teaching, research and jobs on campus
  • Numerous graduate and undergraduate interns across campus, including in the University Office of Sustainability

 

12) Does the head of the sustainability staff report directly to the president or another high-level administrator (e.g., vice president, vice chancellor)?

[  ]  N/A

[  ]  No

[X ]  Yes. Please describe: Provost & Executive Vice President

 

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT

13) Does your school have an office or department specifically dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus?

[  ]  No

[X ]  Yes. Please describe (including name of office or department and year created): University Office of Sustainability, created in 1997, oldest endowed sustainability program in higher education in the US

 

WEBSITE

14) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

[  ]  No

[X]  Yes. Please provide URL: www.sustainableunh.unh.edu ; discoversustainability.org.  Offices and departments across campus also include sustainability information on their websites.

 

GREEN PURCHASING

15) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to full policy, if available:

The University System of New Hampshire (USNH), of which UNH is a part and through which UNH does large vendor contracting, has developed a Vendor Code of Conduct that describes the fundamental ethical and behavioral principles that govern all vendors who do business with any of its institutions.  We expect all vendors to honor this commitment and abide by the provisions of this Vendor Code of Conduct as a condition of doing business with USNH. In doing business with USNH, our vendors and their representatives are expected to:

• Engage in legally-compliant and ethically-sound behavior during the course of business;

• Promote Fair and Respectful interaction with University personnel and third parties;

• Display a commitment to the Environment and to Society;

• Be committed to Workplace and Product Safety;

• Reject all forms of Discrimination & Harassment;

• Display Professionalism, Fairness, and Reliability in all business relations.

USNH encourages and supports the use of local businesses and businesses owned by minorities, women, and veterans.  It is USNH practice to provide these concerns maximum practicable opportunity to participate in purchasing opportunities.

Sustainability Statement included in USNH RFP’s (requests for proposal):

“USNH and  __________ (enter department name) strive to conduct business in a sustainable and energy efficient manner.  This is an effort to balance economic priorities with environmental health and human health.  USNH will, when economically feasible, do business with companies that can further our sustainable objectives.  We are interested in receiving environmental mission statements or information about any programs or policies that have to do with sustainable issues.  These programs or policies can be, but are not limited to, reducing, reusing and recycling resources, disposal of organic and other solid waste, conservation efforts in regards to transportation, energy and water, disposal of hazardous waste, and/or giving back to the community.  USNH also prefers to purchase items with Energy Star™ ratings.  If applicable, please include, as part of your proposal, any pertinent information in reference to any sustainable and/or energy efficient practices and products offered by your Firm.”

Finally, USNH employees with university procurement credit cards (or “Pcards”) on which purchases of under $5,000 can be made, are very strongly encouraged to buy only ENERGY STAR and energy efficient electronics and appliances. 

 

16) Does your school purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products?

[  ]  No

[  ]  Some. Please describe:

[ X]  All: See answer to #15.

 

17) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Some. Begun in 2001, the first goal of the UNH Recycled Paper Initiative was to increase the recycled content of paper used by the UNH community to a percentage higher than the old UNH standard of 30% post consumer. Members of the UNH Recycled Paper Initiative - including representatives from the UNH Student Senate, the UNH Student Environmental Action Coalition, UNH Printing Services, USNH Purchasing Office, UNH Central Receiving, and the UNH Office of Sustainability - issued a Recycled Paper Initiative Report and Recommendations. Afterwards, the USNH recycled paper contract was formally bid and awarded to a vendor who could provide 80% post-consumer recycled paper. This was eventually increased to 100% post consumer recycled paper as the paper industry increased the functionality of 100% recycled content product. 

Today, USNH currently encourages all offices and departments to purchase 100% post consumer paper through the USNH Recycled Copy Paper contract.  The contract was rebid again for 2009 and awarded to USNH’s current office products vendor (OfficeMax), which saves not only fuel/energy and trees,but also reduces emissions by combined deliveries.  In 2009, the contract for janitorial supplies for all of the USNH institutions (of which janitorial paper products played a large role) was rebid with an emphasis on purchasing mainly environmentally-preferable paper goods. USNH faculty and staff are educated and encouraged to choose these options when they make purchases.

UNH Printing Services on the Durham campus also offers printing on a wide variety of recycled, Forest Stewardship Council certified papers.  In addition, cartridges can be dropped off for ink refill via local company Cartridge World.

MORE INFORMATION:

[  ]  All. Please describe:

 

18) Does your school purchase Green Seal, Environmental Choice certified, or biorenewable cleaning products?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Some. Please describe: UNH Housekeeping and contractor UNICCO in Durham; UNH Manchester; and Keene State College’s and Plymouth State University’s Physical Plant departments, who are involved in the cleaning of facilities on each of the USNH campuses, have moved towards less toxic cleaning solutions in order to ensure a healthy learning and working environment for students, faculty, staff, and building service workers. In 2009, the contract for janitorial supplies for all of the USNH institutions was rebid with an emphasis on purchasing environmentally-preferable cleaning supplies whenever possible. This was the first time a whole list of “green” cleaning products was requested by all campuses.  The contract, which consists mainly of environmentally-preferable cleaning products, was awarded to multiple New England-based vendors, with the added goal of reducing energy consumption and emissions by buying locally.  USNH faculty and staff are educated and encouraged to choose these options when they make purchases.

New, greener cleaning products and practices are constantly being tested by all campuses, to ensure they meet expected standards. New product and green cleaning training happens at various times of the year when a new product is introduced by a vendor, or when new information needs to be disseminated to keep everyone updated.

UNH-Durham Housekeeping managers estimate that through the use of greener products, more effective cleaners, and precise dispenser systems, UNH Durham has decreased the amount of cleaning product used by approximately 50% in the past 15 years.

MORE INFORMATION (Just for UNH Durham):

[  ]  All. Please describe:

 

19) Are your school's computer/electronics purchase decisions made in accordance with standards such as the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)?

[  ]  No

[X ]  Some. Please describe: UNH does not currently have the tracking capabilities to meet the EPEAT guidelines. However, it should be noted that all Apple computers sold on campus are EPEAT compliant. Also in 2006, the UNH Vice President for Research and Vice President of Finance and Administration signed into policy the UNH Energy Efficient Product Standard.  The Standard strongly recommends that members of the UNH community purchase products that meet the specifications of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR Program. UNH offices and departments are encouraged to seek out ENERGY STAR products when purchasing new equipment and can find helpful information on doing so through the UNH Energy Office. Finally, UNH Computing & Information Services is committed to sustainability and purchases energy efficient products like computers and servers, among other sustainability practices. 

MORE INFORMATION: 

[  ]  All

 

20) Does your school use only pesticides that meet the standards for organic crop production set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or Canadian Organic Standards (excluding on-campus farms)?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Some. Please describe: As part of the Integrated Pest Management (IPM) system, UNH Facilities does not use pesticides to maintain the campus with the exception of target spraying with a species-specific insecticide to quell an outbreak of a new turf pest in 1999. Instead, UNH utilizes an IPM system to control pests in an environmentally responsible, sustainable manner. UNH uses only one type of pesticide for a beetle that cannot be treated by any alternative. Otherwise, UNH Facilities does not use pesticides to maintain campus grounds. UNH Facilities personnel are responsible for exterior pest monitoring and control on the UNH Durham campus grounds. Crews have worked over the years to try to avoid using insecticides, herbicides, and fungicides. Also, in the summer of 2008 UNH Athletic grounds supervisors worked with Purely Organic, a local landscaping company, to replace synthetic products with organic lawn care products consisting of vinegar, corn, and tea. Vinegar extract and liquefied corn gluten were used for weed management, and a tea compost product was used instead of synthetic fertilizers.

[  ]  All

MORE INFORMATION:

 

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY

21) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?

Please check all that apply.

[  ]  No.

[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

[ X ]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (in metric tons of CO2e). Also, include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

In the winter of 2000, UOS partnered with Clean Air-Cool Planet (CA-CP), an action oriented advocacy group that seeks to reduce the threat of climate change by engaging organizations and institutions in all sectors of civil society, to develop a greenhouse gas emission inventory that adapted national and international inventory methodologies to the unique scale and character of a university community. Data have been reported from 1990-2003, and a 2004-2005 update was released in September 2006. In 2005, UOS and CA-CP partnered again to improve the calculator (creating version 4.1) and its associated support materials, including an updated user guide and a list of frequently asked questions. Over 2,300 institutions have downloaded the calculator to date, and it is the recommended tool of the ACUPCC if a signatory has not used another inventory tool.

UNH is committed to updating its greenhouse gas emissions inventory series regularly in order to comply with the American University and College Presidents Climate Commitment, capture institutional progress in greenhouse gas emissions reductions, and inform the decision-making of the university, especially that of the UNH Energy Task Force.

2008: In the process of analyzing emissions data for Fiscal Year 08 (July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008)

2007: 76,500 MTCDE (Fiscal Year 2007: July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2007)

2006: 82,600 MTCDE (Fiscal Year 2006: July 1, 2005 – June 20, 2006)

2005: 82,650 MTCDE (Fiscal Year 2005 : July 1, 2004 – June 30, 2005)

MORE INFORMATION:

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

The purchase of carbon offsets does not count toward greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for this indicator. They are counted in a subsequent indicator.

22) Has your school made a commitment to reducing GHG emissions by a specific amount?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please list details.

If you answered only "No" or "In progress" to question 21, please now skip to question 27.

Under UNH’s Climate Action Plan – WildCAP - UNH will cut its greenhouse gas emissions:

  • 50% by 2020
  • 80% by 2050 on the road to carbon neutrality by 2100

MORE INFORMATION:

 

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS

23) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions?

[  ]  No

[ X]  Yes. Please list details.

UNH GHG emissions have risen from 1990–2003 and have since been declining. Since the last publication of the inventory in 2005, there has been a 7.5% reduction in emissions due primarily to the installation of an electricity and steam co-generation (combined heat and power) facility on campus in 2006, as well as reductions in transportation emissions. Emissions are expected to decline in FY2008 (July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008) as well as more of the cogeneration plant’s fuel needs are met by natural gas and then by landfill gas. In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine in spring 2009. ECOLine is a landfill gas project that will pipe enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester to the Durham campus. UNH will receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project and will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. By selling RECs, UNH demonstrates fiscal as well as environmental responsibility, improving UNH’s energy security while stabilizing energy costs. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

24) Please provide the total heating and cooling degree days averaged over the past three

Year                HDD               CDD

FY07               6357                630

FY08               6495                538

FY09               6691                427

 

25) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-thousand-square-foot basis for the past three years.

Per-Thousand-Square-Foot Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space in thousands of square feet.

2008: In the process of analyzing emissions data for Fiscal Year 08 (July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008)

2007: 14.2

2006: 16.1

2005: 16.1

 

26) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-full-time-student basis for the past three years.

Per-Student Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time enrolled students.

2008: In the process of analyzing emissions data for Fiscal Year 08 (July 1, 2007 – June 30, 2008)

2007: 5.5

2006: 6.1

2005: 6.2

 

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

27) What programs or technologies has your school implemented to improve energy efficiency (e.g., cogeneration plant, retrocommissioning of HVAC systems, performing system tune-ups, temperature setbacks)? 

 

In 2006, UNH's combined heat and power facility - or cogeneration (COGEN) plant - went online. The primary source of heat and electricity for the five-million square foot Durham campus, COGEN retains waste heat normally lost during the production of electricity and instead uses this energy to heat buildings, in turn reducing sulfur dioxide and nitrous oxide emissions. UNH's COGEN cost an estimated $28 million with an anticipated payback within 20 years and resulted in an estimated reduction in greenhouse gas emissions of 21% in AY2006 compared to AY 2005. In 2009, UNH will become the first university in the U.S. to use landfill gas as its primary energy source. In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH launched ECOLine, a landfill gas project that will pipe enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester to the Durham campus. UNH will receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project and will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. By selling RECs, UNH demonstrates fiscal as well as environmental responsibility, improving UNH’s energy security while stabilizing energy costs. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment.

 

UNH is committed to being as sustainable as feasible in its construction and renovation of buildings. As part of the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment, UNH-Durham is committed to having all new campus construction and major renovation projects achieve U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver standards or equivalent; this policy will be applicable to all new projects initiated after UNH design and construction building standards have been modified in 2009. UNH’s comprehensive approach targets high impact intervention areas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as impacts on biodiversity and cultural continuity. Ranked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the top 5% of universities in its peer group for energy efficiency and by the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers in a 2006 survey of over 100 universities as one of the most energy efficient four-year colleges with graduate programs through the post-doctoral level, UNH has conducted an on-going energy efficiency program for over 30 years. And in May 2006, UNH was the first institution of higher education in the nation to receive ENERGY STAR ratings for residence halls. We now have eight U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR buildings. The 2008 renovation of DeMerrit Hall and the current renovation of James Hall, two of our major science buildings, will stand as models of sustainable renovation - much as the renovation of the University Office of Sustainability did in 1999. The James Hall Renovation has been officially registered with the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to seek LEED Certification. DeMerritt Hall is LEED-Silver equivalent.

 

Other aspects of our energy efficiency efforts include:

  • Efficient Lighting: UNH has used energy efficient compact fluorescent lighting (CFL's) for several years. In combination with T-8 and T-5 fixtures, UNH uses CFL's as a matter of routine on new construction and major renovation projects. UNH has also done some specific lighting upgrade projects using this technology. It is UNH Facilities policy to remove all incandescent lighting through attrition and replace this lighting with CFL's. What's more, no new purchases of incandescent bulbs (unless specific conditions are required that cannot be attained through CFL's) are allowed. Learn about how UNH recycles spent CFL's and encourages their safe disposal...
  • Efficiency Retrofits: Several million dollars have been invested in retrofit projects across the UNH Durham campus, including high efficiency lighting, motor, heating, and cooling, control systems; window upgrades; conversion of electric clothes dryers to natural gas dryers in residence halls; and conversion of domestic hot water conversions from electricity to natural gas.
  • Proper Use of Equipment: Just installing energy efficiency equipment is not enough to save energy, however. UNH Facilities staff play a crucial and role in properly maintaining and operating systems and equipment.
  • Use of hand dryers in restrooms: Electric hand dryers in restrooms are our campus standard for new construction and renovation. Even taking the energy used into consideration they are usually more economical than paper towels and more sanitary. Unfortunately, to retrofit restrooms whose buildings are not undergoing renovation is an expensive undertaking and cannot be accomplished all at one time. However, UNH is working to escalate retrofits from paper towels to hand dryers where feasible.

 

MORE INFORMATION:

 

ENERGY CONSERVATION

28) Do you facilitate programs that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use (e.g., cash incentives, signs reminding individuals to turn off lights and appliances)?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

UNH through a wide variety of departments and offices encourages the entire campus community to conserve energy. Examples include:

  • Education and outreach done by the UNH Energy Task Force, UNH Energy Office, and University Office of Sustainability
  • Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge: www.unh.edu/etf/challenge.html. The Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge is an annual on-campus energy use reduction competition held on the UNH Durham campus for four weeks in the fall semester. The major goal of the Challenge is to engage the students living on campus in activities that facilitate behaviors that reduce the ecological and economic costs associated with the their on-campus energy use. Students compete as a residence hall or an apartment complex to reduce their per capita energy consumption. Each apartment complex and residence hall has one or more volunteer student “Energy Captains” who educate and motivate their fellow students to lessen their ecological footprint, especially their energy use. The three buildings that reduce their energy consumption the most win prizes, bragging rights, a cool student-made trophy that moves from first-place building to first-place building each semester, and peace of mind! The UNH Panhellenic Council often holds a Greek Energy Challenge at the same time.
  • Annual powerdown campaign: www.unh.edu/etf/powerdown.html. Prior to Thanksgiving and winter breaks, the UNH Energy Task Force, UNH Energy Office, and UNH University Office of Sustainability encourage all faculty, staff, and students to powerdown - turn off and unplug all computers, TV's and other electronics, printers and other office equipment, and more - when away from offices, residence halls, or apartments and homes for nights, weekends, and breaks. By "powering down" for the 2008 Thanksgiving holiday break, UNH faculty, staff, and students saved more than $10,000 in energy costs and emissions reductions equivalent to 70 barrels of oil or not driving five passenger cars for one year.
  • Use of computer power management: Computer power management settings are used in 205 computers in UNH Student Computing Clusters. Combined with using LCD monitors (which typically use 34 watts when active instead of the 73 watts used by CRT monitors) in the computer systems purchased in 2004, in FY05 monitor power management in these clusters saved approximately $10,778 in energy costs and prevented 51 MTCDE from being emitted. This energy savings is the equivalent of taking 10 cars off the road or lighting 62 homes for one year.
  • Model energy efficient dorm room:  UNH has both a virtual energy efficient dorm room (www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/climate_ed/wildcap/virtual_dorm.html) and starting in academic year 2009-2010 will have two students living in a room outfitted with ENERGY STAR® and energy efficient appliances from Best Buy® Newington, NH.  UNH Admissions will take special tours through these rooms, and the UNH Energy Office will be monitoring energy use in this room and comparing it to a non-ENERGY STAR® outfitted dorm room.
  • ENERGY STAR® Discounts for UNH parents and students: Anyone with proof of enrollment at UNH (student ID, tuition bill, class registration, etc.) can get a 10% discount on ENERGY STAR® qualified appliances and electronics at Best Buy® Newington, NH.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION

29)  Does your school generate renewable electricity?

[  ]  No

 [  ]  Yes. Please specify percentage of overall electricity generated from each of the following sources and describe details below.

[    %]  B100 biodiesel

[    %]  Clean biomass

[    %]  Concentrating solar power (CSP)

[    %]  Geothermal

[    %]  Low-impact hydropower

[    %]  Solar photovoltaics

[    %]  Wind

[X] Other

Description:

In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine, a landfill gas project that will pipe enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester to the Durham campus, in spring 2009. UNH will receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project and will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. By selling RECs instead of buying them, UNH demonstrates fiscal as well as environmental responsibility, improving UNH’s energy security while stabilizing energy costs. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

30)  Does your school have solar hot water systems?

[X  ]  No

[  ]  Yes. Please specify number of systems and total BTUs generated annually, if available:

 

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE

31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)? RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standard.

[ X ]  No. We sell REC’s instead.

[  ]  Yes. Please describe.

In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine, a landfill gas project that brings enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester, NH, to the Durham campus, in spring 2009. UNH can receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project, but will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

32) Has your school purchased non-electric energy from renewable sources?

[X  ]  No

[  ]  Yes. Please describe.

Date of most recent contract:

Quantity (BTUs):

Percentage of your total non-electric energy use that it represents:

NOTE : In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine, a landfill gas project that brings enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester, NH, to the Durham campus, in spring 2009. UNH can receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project, but will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment. As a result, we can only “claim” up to 10% of BTU’s from landfill gas and are not using “renewable” energy on campus; instead of buying REC’s, we are selling them to help continue to invest in lowering our own emissions. In addition, we are spurring renewable energy development in our region.

MORE INFORMATION

 

ON-SITE COMBUSTION

33) Please provide total BTUs of energy for heating and cooling from on-site combustion:

276,680 MMBTU

 

34) Please list each fuel source (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil) and the percent of overall BTUs derived from that source:

10% landfill gas (project online in Spring 2009)

55% natural gas

35% diesel fuel

NOTE : In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine, a landfill gas project that brings enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester, NH, to the Durham campus, in spring 2009. UNH can receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project, but will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment. As a result, we can only “claim” up to 10% of BTU’s from landfill gas and are not using “renewable” energy on campus; instead of buying REC’s, we are selling them to help continue to invest in lowering our own emissions. In addition, we are spurring renewable energy development in our region.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

35) Is any on-site combustion for heating and cooling derived from renewable sources?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe.

Percentage on-site combustion derived from renewable sources: 10%

Total BTUs of energy generated from renewable sources: 28,000

Description of renewable energy sources used for on-site combustion for heating and cooling:

In partnership with Waste Management of New Hampshire, Inc., UNH finalized ECOLine, a landfill gas project that brings enriched and purified gas from Waste Management’s landfill in Rochester, NH, to the Durham campus, in spring 2009. UNH can receive up to 85% of the energy used by the campus from the ECOLine project, but will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (RECs) to help finance the capital costs of the project and to invest in additional energy efficiency projects on campus. UNH is the first nation in the country to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source. ECOLine and selling RECs are part of UNH’s aggressive climate action plan called “WildCAP,” which will outline how the university will lower its emissions to basically zero and secure its leadership position in climate protection as part of its broader sustainability commitment. As a result, we can only “claim” up to 10% of BTU’s from landfill gas and are not using “renewable” energy on campus; instead of buying REC’s, we are selling them to help continue to invest in lowering our own emissions. In addition, we are spurring renewable energy development in our region.MORE INFORMATION:

 

FOOD & RECYCLING  

The food portion of this category is covered in a separate dining survey.

 

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS

36) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles (check all that apply).

[  ]  None

[ X ]  Aluminum

[ X]  Cardboard

[ X ]  Glass

[ X ]  Paper

[  ]  Plastics (all)

[X  ]  Plastics (some)

[X ]  Other. Please list: Steel (Tin, Soup Cans, and Metal Jar Lids). Please go to www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/biodiv_ed/wastemanagement.html for more information.

 

37) Diversion rate: 30.75%

MORE INFORMATION:

 

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE

38) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. If available, please indicate the total annual weight or volume of each material collected for recycling or reuse.

[  X  ]  Batteries

FY ‘2009 Data

•           Lead acid batteries: 8,542 lbs

•           NiCd batteries: 846 lbs

•           Lithium ion batteries: 29 lbs

[    ]  Cell phones: The University Office of Sustainability provides information on their website about off-campus recycling and proper disposal of electronic materials.

[  X  ]  Computers: University System of NH employees can also donate and sell used electronic and other items through USNH Surplus: www.unh.edu/purchasing/surplus/index.html . Also, the UNH Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) manages the disposal of scrap electronics for UNH Durham faculty and staff. Scrap electronics includes CPUs, monitors, televisions, keyboards, mice, and more.  See “Other” below.

[ X   ]  Lightbulbs

Fluorescent lamps (57,369 linear ft)

 Each

1 ft

 58

2 ft

 580

3 ft

 229

4 ft

 12,876

8 ft

 495

Circular Fluoresent Lamp

 738

Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL's)

 5,221

U-Tubes

 1,452

HID lamps

 854

 

[  X  ]  Printer cartridges: Data not available. UNH Facilities holds all the printer cartridges until they have a truck load (1 ton pickup), then delivers them to Reliable Technologies in Manchester, NH.  The company sorts through the cartridges, keeps those that can be recycled (paying UNH for these) and destroying those that cannot. To create fewer cartridges in the first place, UNH Printing Services offers a “Refill, Don’t Landfill” program in which cartridges can be refilled with ink through Cartridge World.

[  X  ]  Other E-waste. Please list:

The UNH Office of Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) manages the disposal of scrap electronics for university faculty and staff. Scrap electronics includes CPUs, monitors, televisions, keyboards, mice, photocopiers, printers, various types of laboratory analytical devices, or any other electronic device that contains a circuit board. With the exception of computer monitors and televisions (cathode ray tubes), which are regulated under the Universal Waste Rules, these items are not specifically required to be managed as regulated waste. However, due to the lead content of printed circuitry, and the potential for other hazardous materials in electronic devices, scrap electronics must not be disposed in the municipal waste stream. In Fiscal Year 09 (July 1, 2008 – June 30, 2009), 44,044 pounds of e-waste were collected to reuse or recycling.

University System of NH employees can also donate and sell used electronic and other items through USNH Surplus: www.unh.edu/purchasing/surplus/index.html.

The University Office of Sustainability provides information on their website about off-campus recycling and proper disposal of electronic materials.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

COMPOSTING (ASIDE FROM DINING FACILITIES)

39) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

100%. In the fall, all of the fallen leaves are collected by UNH Facilities Grounds and Events Support and brought to the UNH composting windrows at Kingman Farm. In the spring, UNH Facilities Grounds and Events Support uses compost from Kingman Farm for all of Durham campus flowerbeds.

 

40) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

In addition to all dining halls, there are composting receptacles at the UNH Dairy Bar. The Dairy Bar uses biodegradable and compostable to-go containers, cups, forks, knifes, spoons, plates, etc. that are collected, pulped and added to the UNH composting windrows. Composting bins are also put out (along with recycling and trash bins) at key UNH events like Commencement and University Day.

Recycling bins are located in all campus buildings (residence halls, offices and academic buildings), in athletics facilities, and outside around areas where people walk.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

SOURCE REDUCTION

41) Do you have any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

[  ]  No

[  X]  Yes. Please describe:

University System of NH employees can donate and sell used electronic and other items through USNH Surplus: www.unh.edu/purchasing/surplus/index.html.

Every May at the end of the academic year, several offices and student organizations partner on UNH-RENU – Recycle Everything New/Used. Boxes and bins are put in residence halls and on-campus apartments so that students can donate used clothing, unopened food, and other non-perishable, non-regulated waste items.  This past May 2009, student and staff volunteers collected 2,220 lbs of clothes in Planet Aid bins put on campus just for the end of the semester. Volunteers also collected 20 full boxes of food for local food pantries and food banks, such as the Waysmeet Food Pantry in Durham, and kitchen and other items, which were donated to a local Good Will store.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

GREEN BUILDING

 

GREEN BUILDING POLICY

42) Does your school have a formal green building policy?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

UNH is committed to being as sustainable as feasible in its construction and renovation of buildings. As part of the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment, UNH-Durham is committed to having all new campus construction and major renovation projects achieve U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver standards or equivalent; this policy will be applicable to all new projects initiated after UNH design and construction building standards have been modified in 2009. UNH’s comprehensive approach targets high impact intervention areas to reduce greenhouse gas emissions as well as impacts on biodiversity and cultural continuity. Ranked by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the top 5% of universities in its peer group for energy efficiency and by the Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers in a 2006 survey of over 100 universities as one of the most energy efficient four-year colleges with graduate programs through the post-doctoral level, UNH has conducted an on-going energy efficiency program for over 30 years. And in May 2006, UNH was the first institution of higher education in the nation to receive ENERGY STAR ratings for residence halls. We now have eight U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR buildings. The 2008 renovation of DeMerrit Hall and the current renovation of James Hall, two of our major science buildings, will stand as models of sustainable renovation - much as the renovation of the University Office of Sustainability did in 1999. The James Hall Renovation has been officially registered with the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) to seek LEED Certification. DeMerritt Hall is LEED-Silver equivalent.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS

43) Please indicate LEED-certified buildings.

[0 to date, 1 under renovation and going for LEED-Gold; 1 LEED-Silver equivalent renovation completed; 11ENERGY STAR® rated residence halls 

0 Total number of LEED-certified buildings

[    sq ft]  Certified-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

[    sq ft]  Silver-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

[    sq ft]  Gold-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

[    sq ft]  Platinum-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

53,000  sq ft LEED-Silver equivalent (1 building) to date: DeMerrit Hall

 

44) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED certification criteria but are not certified.

[# 1  ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria

[# sq ft]  Certified-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

[53,000  sq ft]  Silver-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: DeMeritt Hall; unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2008/Aug/06demeritt.cfm

[    sq ft]  Gold-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

[    sq ft]  Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

 

45) Please indicate buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

11  Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings. Please list building names: Congreve Hall, Lord Hall, McLaughlin Hall, Randall-Hitchcock Hall, Sawyer Hall, Jessie Doe Hall, Gibbs Hall, Hunter Hall, Englehardt Hall, buildings P, Q and R of the Woodside Apartment Complex, administrative building Taylor Hall

290,687  Combined gross square footage.

 

RENOVATIONS AND RETROFITS

46) Please indicate LEED-EB certified buildings.

[#    0 to date]  Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings. Please list building names:

[   0 sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

 

47) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified.

[#   0   ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified. Please list building names:

[]  Combined gross square footage.

 

48) Please indicate renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.

See #45.

[#      ]  Total number of renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled. Please list building names:

[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

 

49) What energy-efficiency technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., HVAC systems, motion sensors, ambient light sensors, T5 lighting, LED lighting, timers, laundry technology)?    For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of maintained building space have been retrofitted with motion sensors; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data). 

See #27.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

50) What water-conservation technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., low-flow faucets, low-flow showerheads, waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, gray water systems, laundry technology)?    For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of the maintained building space have been retrofitted with low-flow faucets; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).  

 

UNH takes several proactive approaches to conserve water, including following EPA WaterSense guidelines. Some of the following approaches are being utilized. UNH has made several adjustments to its water systems to maximize conservation.

  • Construction and Renovation Mandates: UNH mandates new construction or renovation in buildings to use low flow toilets, urinals, faucets, and showers. This also extends to dishwaters and cooling systems. The newest aspect has been the introduction of waterless urinals, such as those in Holloway Commons as part of UNH Dining's Local Harvest Initiative and commitment to sustainability. In addition, UNH is incorporating dual flush toilets in the DeMerritt Hall and James Hall renovation projects.
  • Education of the Campus Community: UNH educates everyone on campus to not waste water by turning off faucets, reporting leaks and drips in sinks, showers, and toilets to Residence Hall Directors or to UNH Facilities Maintenance at 862-1437, and to not dump anything down sewer drains or kitchen and bathroom sinks. Students are encouraged to only wash full loads of clothes - and to wash with lukewarm or cold water, not hot, to turn off the water while brushing their teeth, to take shorter showers, etc.
  • Meter calibrations: The master meters at the Durham water treatment plant (WTP) are calibrated bi-annualy whereas the the American Water Works Association (AWWA) regulates only once per year. The building meters are checked via monthly readings. Should a meter be 15% above or below a running average, it is investigated. If there are no apparent reasons (construction, occupancy, etc.) for this change, the meter is calibrated (up to 2 inches). A meter must have no more than a 5% error to be reutilized. Meters over 2 inches are scheduled on a rotating basis to be calibrated by a qualified service technician; usually 5-8 meters are calibrated annually. The latest innovation is automatic meter reading (AMR). AMR is being phased in to all meters on campus, not just water meters, in order to be more efficient in the reading process and to allow for instantaneous readings, thus giving a quicker indication of meter discrepancies.
  • Water Treatment Plant Conservation: At the Durham water treatment plant (WTP), clean water is used to backwash (clean) the filters; much of this water is reclaimed by injecting the spent water back into the treatment train to be processed again.
  • UNH is installing a rainwater reclamation system at James Hall.  The system collects rainwater from the roof, stores the water in a large tank and uses that water for flushing toilets & urinals in the buildings.
  • UNH installed the first major pervious concrete parking facilitiy in New England in 2007, replacint the surface of a parking lot by Williamson Hall. The project is overseen by researchers at the UNH Stormwater Research Center, who are studying its effectiveness as a stormwater management tool.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

51) What percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste is diverted from landfills?

Quantity of construction and demolition materials recycled, donated, or otherwise recovered from the renovation of DeMeritt Hall in 2008: 4,650,000 pounds. 98% of the rubble has been recycled for the DeMeritt Hall reconstruction. That amounts to 2,325 tons. About 1,470 of those—or 62 percent--were bricks and concrete. Mixed materials accounted for 16 percent of the reused waste while 7 percent was wood and 6 percent was metal. This information is just for one building on campus. Information on previous buildings was not available. 

 

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

 

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES

52) Are there any sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please provide details below.

Name of program: Through UNH Residential Life, a number of sustainability-related themed housing for first year students has been offered over the last few years.  Examples include a “Living Green” community of over 25 students in Hunter Hall for the 2009-2010 academic year. Past themes have included “Be the Change You Want to See in the World,” “International Living,” “Outdoor Experiential Education,” “Common Purposes,” “Voice,” “Community Service,” and democracy/citizenship.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION

53) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe how sustainability is incorporated (e.g., information sessions, green tour): UNH includes sustainability in new student orientation activities by providing students with information online (www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/students.html), via UNH’s parents newsletter “Parenthesis,” providing information at tables at new parent and student orientation in June on campus, providing information at student events every fall, etc.

A representative from the UNH University Office of Sustainability participates in training for new and existing Dormitory Resident Assistants and Hall Directors in order to engage them in sustainability news and events. Information is also provided via tabling at the Resident Assistants resource fair in August.

The UNH University Office of Sustainability partners with UNH Commuter Services at the beginning of each academic year to give information to students commuting to the UNH campus, including flyers with information and information that is mailed out in the UNH Community Guide.

In 2009, UNH will launch a new model energy efficient residence hall room in which two students will live.  UNH Admissions will conduct a number of tours for parents and students through the room.  Energy use in the room will also be measured and compared to a non-energy efficient room.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES

54) Does your school offer on-campus office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please provide number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student:

Many offices and departments across campus offer paid and unpaid internship or work opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students.  Such offices and departments include but are not limited to:

  • University Office of Sustainability
  • Energy & Campus Development
  • Dining
  • Dual Major in EcoGastronomy
  • Carbon Solutions New England
  • NH Carbon Challenge

 

In January 2009, UNH launched a new Sustainability Internship Program (SIP). SIP helps students gain valuable work experience where they can learn from dedicated mentors how to incorporate sustainability into their professional and personal lives, while applying their knowledge and ideas to benefit these organizations and help create more sustainable communities. Through SIP, students not only apply what they learn in the classroom to their work with participating organizations (UNH offices and departments but also outside businesses, non-profits, government agencies, towns and cities, and more), but also participate as a group in outside-the-classroom learning about sustainability. Using a learning community model, students come together in-person and virtually several times throughout the semester to discuss common readings and podcasts, listen to guest speakers with expertise in sustainability and related careers, go on field trips, or participate in on-campus sustainability events like the annual Local Harvest Dinner. Students are required to blog about what they are learning and doing -- both in their internships and through this outside-the-classroom learning -- via the UNH Career Center blog.  They are also required to participate in UNH's annual Undergraduate Research Conference (URC). In spring 2009, nine students were hired by the seven employers below for the spring semester:

  • Clean Air - Cool Planet
  • Carbon Solutions New England
  • NH Carbon Challenge
  • Pax World Funds
  • Mount Washington Resort
  • NH Restaurant and Lodging Association
  • USDA Forest Service Northeast Region

MORE INFORMATION:

 

55) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or other similar programs to promote behavioral change on campus?

[  ]  No

[X  ]  Yes. Please provide details below, and indicate URL if available:

[#     ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:

[#     ]  Positions that award academic credit. Average hours worked weekly per student:

[As many students as want to be involved]  Uncompensated positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 5, sometimes more depending on campaigns going on at the time.

The UNH Ecological Advocates engage their fellow UNH Durham students in environmentally sustainable behaviors in order to foster an atmosphere of increased sustainability awareness, thinking, and living among on-campus residents.  Their goals are:

  • To help students connect larger environmental issues to their daily lives, studies, and choices at UNH.
  • To promote thinking and discussion about environmental sustainability among students.
  • To engage students in eco-friendly behaviors that will last a lifetime.
  • To work with UNH faculty and staff to ensure that the student perspective and voice are heard in sustainability discussions -- and to work with them to transform UNH into a sustainable learning community.

Activities including:

  • Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge every fall
  • RecycleMania and UNN-RENU every spring
  • Other campaigns around waste reduction, recycling, food waste minimization, Earth Day, and more! The Ecological Advocates held or participated in a number of fun and informative events to celebrate Earth Day 2008. The week's events focused each day on different topic: rethink, reduce, reuse, recycle, renew, respect, and rejoice.
  • Awareness-raising events on campus, such as Step It Up and SolarFest
  • Participation in local community efforts, like environmental activities for children at the Durham Public Library

MORE INFORMATION:

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

56) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

[  ]  No

[X  ]  Yes. Please provide total number of active organizations, names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs, if available:

Many student organizations and groups on campus advance sustainability. Examples include the following, and links to their websites can be found at sustainableunh.unh.edu/students.html#studentorgs

  • Artists Circle
  • ChildVoice International
  • Circle K
  • Diversity Support Coalition
  • Earth Science Club
  • Eaton House
  • Ecological Advocates, the student group that runs the Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge
  • Energy Club
  • Forestry Club
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Mask and Dagger Dramatic Society
  • Model UN
  • NH Outing Club
  • Organic Garden Club
  • Oxfam UNH
  • Peace and Justice League
  • Project Sunshine
  • Relay for Life
  • Rotaract Club
  • STAND
  • Student Arts Association
  • Student Environmental Action Council (SEAC)
  • Student Nutrition Association
  • Students Advocating Gender Equality
  • Students Without Borders
  • UNH for ONE
  • UNH Slow Food
  • WildACTS Social Change Theatre Troupe
  • Wildlife Society

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

57) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please list details for all competitions.

  • Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge : www.unh.edu/etf/challenge.html. The Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge is an annual on-campus energy use reduction competition held on the UNH Durham campus for four weeks in the fall semester. The major goal of the Challenge is to engage the students living on campus in activities that facilitate behaviors that reduce the ecological and economic costs associated with the their on-campus energy use. Students compete as a residence hall or an apartment complex to reduce their per capita energy consumption. Each apartment complex and residence hall has one or more volunteer student “Energy Captains” who educate and motivate their fellow students to lessen their ecological footprint, especially their energy use. The three buildings that reduce their energy consumption the most win prizes, bragging rights, a cool student-made trophy that moves from first-place building to first-place building each semester, and peace of mind! The UNH Panhellenic Counci often holds a Greek Energy Challenge at the same time.
  • RecyleMania : www.recyclemania.org.  UNH participates every spring semester in the waste minimization competition of RecycleMania as part of its American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment obligations. http://www.sustainableunh.unh.edu/biodiv_ed/recyclemania.html

  

TRANSPORTATION

 

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET

58) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?

Approximately 300 licensed on-road vehicles, including 32 public transit buses.

 

59) Please list the number of alternative-fuel vehicles in each class.

UNH has a branded and trademarked alternative fuel vehicle fleet called Eco-Cat.  All AFVs on the road at UNH wear the Eco-Cat label, which alerts the community to the alternative fuel as well as its benefit.

  • Hybrid (3) :  2 Toyota Prius   and 1 Honda Civic Hybrid gas-electric hybrids
  • Electric (8) :  5 GEM Electric NEV, 2 Miles Electric NEV flatbed trucks, 1 Azure Dynamic full size box truck
  • Biodiesel : As of August 2008, UNH has been striving to run all of its diesel fleet (32) on B20 low sulfur diesel provided in cooperation with the state DOT.  We are at 90% compliance with that goal - a few remaining emergency or pre-1994 vehicles are still run on standard diesel, but these are being phased out 100% of UNH diesel transit vehicles are CARB certified running B20.   In FY 2008, UNH consumed approximately 77,000 gallons of B20.
  • Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) (9): UNH has been running CNG vehicles since 2002.   In FY 2008, UNH CNG vehicles logged over 200,000 miles on the road with an estimated 10,000 gge CNG consumption.  The use of CNG in the UNH fleet over the past four years has reduced over 250 tons of CO 2 emissions.  In FY 09-10, UNH will add 4-6 new CNG vehicles to its fleet.
  • Bi-Fuel CNG-Unleaded (5): UNH has 5 CNG-unleaded bi-fuel pickup trucks that are run primarily on CNG duty cycles. 

 

60) What is the average GHG emission rate per passenger mile of your institution's motorized fleet?

Total fleet emissions in 2007 were 1,950 MT eCO2. We cannot provide GHG emissions per passenger mile of our motorized fleet because:

  • We are unsure which classes of vehicles (passenger cars, trucks, buses, etc.) you want included, what fuel types you want included, etc.  UNH has a diverse mix of both. Even if we did have the odometer and fuel mileage down to the vehicle level (which we do not reliably have at this time), this question needs to specify exclusion of transit vehicles, utility vehicles, etc. – basically set some parameters by fuel type, vehicle class, etc.
  • We would not be able to provide average mpg.  We might be able to provide total miles for a year, but not accurate fuel consumption per vehicle information.
  • Asking for this kind of aggregate number that mixes classes of vehicles, types of fuels, etc., does not tell you much in terms of how a campus is addressing climate change, improving air quality, improving mobility and accessibility, and overall improving campus community life through transportation demand management.  We’d be happy to connect you with our transportation/climate staff and talk through metrics that would better assess what you want to know here.  Please let Sara Cleaves know.

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES

61) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe details of the program including the type of the incentive and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

Fifty parking spaces have been set aside in Lot C, section 2 on the UNH Durham campus for UNH faculty/staff or commuter student parking permit holders who carpool to campus with two or more passengers.  UNH also partners with GoLoco to provide ride-sharing and ride-matching services. In fall 2009, UNH will be partnering with ZipCar to offer ZipCar services on campus.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

62) Does your school offer public transportation subsidies?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe the program including the size of the discount (as a percent of full price) and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

See answer to #63.

 

63) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

UNH boasts New Hampshire’s largest public transit system, and highlights include the following:

  • Campus Connector: Six fixed route on-campus/in-town, high frequency system open to all.  Approximately 50% of the fleet runs on compressed natural gas (CNG).   ADA accessible Para transit system operates door to door as well
  • Wildcat Transit: UNH's off-campus transit system that is free to UNH ID holders and $1 for general public access. Handicap accessible with bike racks for use on all buses, Wildcat Transit connects the UNH community with the Campus Connector shuttle system, with local, state, and region-wide commercial bus service, and with the Dover and Durham Amtrak Downeaster train stations. Wildcat Transit also offers a guaranteed ride home program for transit riders during the academic year. UNH continues to grow its transit offerings, especially into the densest travel routes and off-campus housing areas used by UNH faculty, staff, and students.  The service is operated without federal operating assistance.
  • UNH has 20-plus CNG and CARB-certified, low sulfur transit vehicles.
  • Amtrak Downeaster: Amtrak Downeaster service in Durham began 2001, serving the communities of Old Orchard Beach, Saco/Biddeford, and Wells in Maine; Dover, Durham (home to UNH) and Exeter in New Hampshire; and Haverhill and Woburn in Massachusetts. With five roundtrips a day originating in Portland, Maine and terminating at North Station in Boston, Mass, the service regularly rates well for on-time service and customer satisfaction. Amtrak Downeaster ridership has exploded and will exceed 60,000 trips to/from Durham in 2008. This is an average 20% per year annual growth over the past 5 years and represents a reduction of over 2.5 million private vehicle trips and the prevention of over 10,000 tons of carbon dioxide emissions.
  • In 2008, UNH WildCat Transit won the Federal Transit Administration "Success in Enhancing Ridership Award" in the 50,000 to 200,000 population category. Wildcat Transit was recognized for its efforts in getting at least 5% more passengers per year over a two-year period; UNH has used better traveler information, nicer bus shelters (with solar power lighting), a website with regularly updated transit and parking information, and new biodiesel transit buses to increase ridership by 21 percent.
  • Wildcat Transit ridership has increased at double digit rates for five years -- 150% over the 1999-2008 period -- and in Fiscal Year 2008 UNH provided over 1.1 million transit trips – a new record! Combined ridership on Wildcat Transit and the Campus Connector has averaged 9% yearly growth over the past 5 years. Ridership has doubled since 2000. This represents an estimated reduction of over 4.5 million private vehicle miles traveled (PVMT) removing over 2,200 metric  tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year (based on 25mpg typical gas powered car and 23 lbCO2/gal)

MORE INFORMATION

 

64) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe: See answer to #63.

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM

65) Does your school offer a bicycle-sharing/rental program or bicycle repair services?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please provide details below.

Managed by UNH Transportation Services, the Cat Cycles program began in the late 1990’s/early 2000’s and allows any member of the university community to sign out a bike at the UNH Visitor Service Center and have sole use of the bike for up to a week – for free. All the bikes are durable, single-speed "cruisers" equipped with a lock, fenders, and a cargo basket. unh.edu/transportation/programs/bikeprogram.htm

 

CAR-SHARING PROGRAM

66) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes – coming soon. Please provide details below.

UNH is now in discussions with ZipCar to offer the ZipCar car-sharing program on campus. We will have the program in place in fall 2009.

 

PLANNING

67) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:

[  ]  No

[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

UNH’s commitment to sustainable transportation is part of its Climate Education Initiative. Under a framework of Transportation Demand Management (TDM), which seeks to reduce our use of single occupancy vehicle private vehicles, UNH takes a holistic approach that includes expanded free transit services, increased on-campus housing, development of improved transit and bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure, support of the Amtrak Downeaster regional rail service, and ongoing educational and information programs aimed at providing expanded mobility without private vehicle use. Such sustainable transportation planning is an integral part of the UNH Campus Master Plan adopted in 2004 and local private development planning. Our efforts reinforce a walking/biking campus to reduce the need for private vehicles and to provide mobility choices.

UNH collects data on its transportation systems (transit, vehicle fuel consumption, mileage) and community transportation needs and behaviors as a way of benchmarking and tracking progress in its sustainable transportation system goals. This data collection is permitting UNH to measure effectiveness versus peer institutions.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

68) What percentage of individuals commute to campus via environmentally preferable transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling, carpooling, using public transit)?

12% faculty and staff, 7% of off-campus/commuter students most of time or always carpool, take Wildcat Transit, walk, or get to campus in some way other than driving alone.  This is 2007 data.  We estimate that transit mode share has increased slightly since that time.  We estimate that 95% of on-campus resident students walk, bike or take the Campus Connector system for their ‘commute’ trips.

It is worth noting that as UNH transit ridership has increased over the past several years, and that commuter and resident parking permit sales have been flat or declined as campus enrollment has grown slightly.   We believe this is a marker of TDM success. Wildcat Transit ridership has increased at double digit rates for five years -- 150% over the 1999-2008 period -- and in Fiscal Year 2008 UNH provided over 1.1 million transit trips – a new record! Combined ridership on Wildcat Transit and the Campus Connector has averaged 9% yearly growth over the past 5 years. Ridership has doubled since 2000. This represents an estimated reduction of over 4.5 million private vehicle miles traveled (PVMT) removing over 2,200 metric  tons of carbon dioxide emissions per year (based on 25mpg typical gas powered car and 23 lbCO2/gal)

In addition, UNH has been increasing the share of on-campus housing (a significant TDM precursor).  The 2004 Campus Master Plan set a goal of 65%.  We are at approximately 60% at this time.

MORE INFORMATION:

 

STATISTICS

Questions 76-87 are for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

69) Campus setting:

[ X ]  Rural

[  ]  Suburban

[  ]  Urban

[  ]  Other. Please describe:

70)  Total number of buildings: 240 buildings, 183 buildings that are 2,000 square feet or larger

71)  Combined gross square footage of all buildings: 5,980,852

72)  Full-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): Student snapshot (Fall 2008, Durham only)

Total all undergraduates: 11,659

Total all graduate and professional students: 1,266

GRAND TOTAL ALL STUDENTS: 12,925

73)  Part-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): Exact number not available, estimate over 2,000

74)  Part-time enrollment as a proportion to a full-time course load: Not available

75)  Percent of full-time students that live on campus: 51% of full-time students live on campus

MORE INFORMATION

 

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Please mark an "X" next to each item that applies to your institution.

76)  Outdoors club: [ X ]

77)  Disposable water bottle ban: [  ]

78)  Participation in Recyclemania: [ X ]

79)  Student trustee position/reps who meet with Board of Trustees: [ X ]

80)  Environmental science/studies major: [X  ]

81)  Environmental science/studies minor or concentration: [ X ]

82)  Graduate-level environmental program: [X  ]

83)  Student green fee: [  ]

84)  Alumni green fund: [  ]

85)  Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects: [ X ]

Beginning in FY10, $650K will be spent on energy efficiency projects. The annual savings from this funding, along with continued reinvestment savings, will be collected from the campus via a systems benefit charge to further efficiency projects.

86)  Campus garden or farm: [ X ]

87)  Single-stream recycling: [  ]

 

MORE INFORMATION

The University of New Hampshire (UNH) is nationally recognized as a Sustainable Learning Community -- a land grant, sea grant, and space grant university that unites the spirit of discovery with the challenge of sustainability across its CORE --

·         C urriculum : Educating citizen-professionals to advance sustainability in their civic and professional lives

·         O perations : Embodying first principles and best practices of sustainability

·         R esearch : Serving society with scholarship that responds to the most pressing issues of sustainability

·         E ngagement : Collaborating locally to globally with extension and outreach

-- through four initiatives designed around four foundational systems of sustainability -- biodiversity, climate, food, and culture.

·         Biodiversity Education Initiative (BEI): Commitment to being a Biodiversity Protection Campus that promotes ecological and public health through the protection of biodiversity and ecosystem integrity.

·         Climate Education Initiative (CEI): Commitment to being a Climate Protection Campus that pursues carbon neutrality through sustainable energy and emissions reduction policies, practices, research, and education.

·         Culture & Sustainability Initiative (CAS): Commitment to being a Cultural Development Campus that promotes a culture of sustainability through a dedication to community, diversity, citizen engagement, public arts, and the conservation and sustainable development of cultural and natural resources.

·         Food & Society Initiative (FAS): Commitment to being a Sustainable Food Community that promotes healthy food systems from farm to fork to health and nutrition outcomes.

Discover the sustainable learning community at UNH at sustainableunh.unh.edu and discoversustainability.org.

** Please see sustainableunh.unh.edu/successes.html and sustainableunh.unh.edu/awards.html for more information.  **

Awards and Recognition

·         2009 Environmental Business Council of New England, Inc., Environmental Merit Award for Leadership by a Non-Profit Organization: In 2009, UNH received the "Environmental Merit Award for Leadership by a Non-Profit Organization" from the Environmental Business Council of New England, Inc.

·         In July 2008, UNH was one of 11 universities nationwide to receive the top score in a new "Green Rating" of colleges by The Princeton Review.

·         On 2008 Kaplan College Guide List of 25 Cutting-Edge Green Schools

·         Overall Judges Award Winner, 2008 Business NH's Leanest And Greenest Awards

·         One of 25 universities nationwide to achieve “Campus Sustainability Leader” status from the Sustainable Endowments Institute’s College Sustainability Report Card 2008

·         National Wildlife Federation 2008 Climate Leadership Report cites UNH climate leadership

·         UNH sustainability leadership profiled in second issue of "Sustainability: The Journal of Record"

·         2008 Outstanding Civil Engineering Award (OCEA) for EcoLine™ landfill gas project

·         The Growing a Green Generation Project, an initiative of UNH’s Child Study and Development Center, was awarded a 2008 Wuzzleburg Preschool Garden Award by the National Gardening Association. One of only 75 recipients nationwide, the project was selected for its demonstrated commitment to creatively and actively engaging young children in the gardening process as a way to help them get off to a great start and to develop a lifelong love of learning.

·         In 2007, UNH’s annual Local Harvest gourmet dinner won a Loyal E. Horton Bronze Dining Award and had its largest turnout yet, nearly 3,700 people.

 

Other Highlights

·         Oldest endowed program in the US: The UNH University Office of Sustainability (UOS) is the oldest endowed sustainability program in higher education in the U.S. It has four full-time staff, four part-time staff, and often employs student interns, faculty fellows, and others in its efforts.

 

·         More than 60 faculty and staff across campus contributed to “The Sustainable Learning Community: One University’s Journey to the Future,” published by the University Press of New England in 2009. www.upne.com/1-58465-771-5.html.

 

·         UNH's College of Life Science and Agriculture (COLSA) reorganized over the last two years to strengthen and expand its leadership in the interdisciplinary fields of sustainable food systems, natural resources and sustainable communities. colsa.unh.edu

·         Sustainability was the overarching theme of 2009 commencement: all speeches and honorary degrees focused on sustainability; EcoLine™ was formally launched in the president’s speech; programs were printed on recycled paper and invitations were issued electronically; food scraps were composted; shuttle buses ran on biodiesel and CNG and reduced idling; porta-potties used environmentally friendly chemicals; students were encouraged to “recycle” their robes. unh.edu/news/cj_nr/2009/may/jr23sustain.cfm; unh.edu/president/markhuddleston/speeches/commencement2009.htm

·         UNH joined AASHE from its first year of operation in 2006, and Chief Sustainability Officer Tom Kelly is on AASHE’s Advisory Council. UNH is also one of the founding members of the Northeast Campus Sustainability Consortium.

·         UNH is one of the 90 campuses chosen to pilot AASHE’s Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System (STARS) in 2008. unh.edu/news/campusjournal/2008/Mar/26sustain.cfm

·         As a land-, sea-, and space-grant institution, UNH engages the public around sustainability with a number of initiatives, including Carbon Solutions New England™; a public-private partnership that integrates science, technology, and policy to address the challenge of regional carbon neutrality; the New Hampshire Carbon Challenge, a grassroots effort that helps New Hampshire residents reduce their household carbon dioxide emissions by 10,000 pounds per year; the New Hampshire Farm to School Program, which helps more than half of the state’s K-12 schools integrate local foods in their cafeterias; New Hampshire Center for a Food Secure Future, which promotes comprehensive, systemic approaches linking local and regional food, farms, and nutrition issues to improve the integrity of the entire food system; and UNH Cooperative Extension.

·         Undergraduate and graduate coursework in climate change science and policy, marine sciences, sustainable engineering, environmental sociology, women’s studies, art and theatre, cultural heritage, organic agriculture, public health, and more. Also a sustainable living minor.

·         Launched nation’s first dual major in EcoGastronomy in 2008, integrating sustainable agriculture, hospitality management, and nutrition. The dual major is interdisciplinary, international (students must spend a semester studying in Italy at the University of Gastronomic Sciences), and experiential. unh.edu/ecogastronomy

·         More than 750 undergraduates have taken Earth Sciences 405: Global Environmental Change in which they interview and play the roles of UNH administrators and staff, then negotiate campus emission reduction strategies they present to the UNH Energy Task Force. Other courses involve students in research that’s part of Carbon Solutions New England carbonsolutionsne.org

·         Of the $99 million in external research dollars received by UNH (FY 08), more than 60% went to environmental research. Strengths include climate science and policy, fisheries management and restoration, marine sciences, environmental engineering, organic dairy management, rural and sustainable community development, and more. A UNH scientist served on the 2007 Nobel Prize-winning Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and in 2009 a UNH scientist received the Coastal America Partnership Award, the only environmental award of its kind given by the U.S. president.

·         Organic dairy research farm –first in the nation at a land-grant. www.organicdairy.unh.edu.

·         At the annual Undergraduate Research Conference – one of the nation’s largest -- students showcase research around sustainability, including topics like microbial fuel cells, sustainable community dinners, wind turbines, and more. www.unh.edu/urc/

·         Student orgs include the Organic Garden Club, Ecological Advocates, UNH Slow Food, Engineers Without Borders, and UNH Energy Club. sustainableunh.unh.edu/students.html

·         A Sustainability Internship Program launched in 2009 has students working on sustainability for employers like Pax World Funds, Clean Air – Cool Planet, the Mount Washington Resort, USDA Forest Service, and others, participating in outside-the-classroom learning about sustainability, blogging, and presenting at the Undergraduate Research Conference. sustainableunh.unh.edu/internship.html

·         Annual campus-wide dialogues since 2005 have focused on globalization, energy, democracy, poverty and health.

·         In 2009, UNH became the first university in the nation to use landfill gas as its primary fuel source, meeting up to 85% of campus needs. UNH will sell the associated renewable energy certificates (REC's) to help finance the capital costs of the project and invest in additional energy efficiency on campus. EcoLine™ and selling RECs are part of UNH’s climate action plan (“WildCAP”), which calls for reducing emissions 50% by 2020 and 80% by 2050 on the road to carbon neutrality by 2100. UNH was an early signer of the Presidents Climate Commitment. sustainableunh.unh.edu/climate_ed/cogen_landfillgas.html; unh.edu/etf/wildcap.html

·         UNH was the first New England land-grant university to sign the ACUPCC (February 2007) and is in the early leadership circle of signatories.

·         Largest public transit system in New Hampshire. Most vehicles run on biodiesel and compressed natural gas. Ridership has doubled since 2000 and in FY08 exceeded 1.1 million trips -- a reduction of over 4 million private vehicle miles traveled and over 21,000 tons of CO2. Also increased on-campus housing; improved transit and bicycle/pedestrian infrastructure (including new bike lanes and bus shelters with solar power lighting); supported Amtrak Downeaster rail service and renovated the historic station on campus; and participated in GoLoco ridesharing. Designated as a “Best Workplace for Commuters” since 2004, in 2008 UNH won a Federal Transit Administration "Success in Enhancing Ridership Award.”  sustainableunh.unh.edu/climate_ed/transportation.html

·         Over 2,300 campuses in North America are using the “Campus Carbon Calculator™,” which the UNH developed with Clean Air – Cool Planet in 2000. UNH has reported emissions from 1990-2007. sustainableunh.unh.edu/climate_ed/greenhouse_gas_inventory.html

·         Received the first-in-the-nation Energy Star rating for residence halls in 2006. Students worked with the UNH Energy Office and EPA New England to crunch the numbers and apply for UNH to get these honors. DeMeritt Hall, replaced in 2008, is LEED-Silver equivalent, and the now-ongoing renovation of James Hall is registered to seek LEED Certification sustainableunh.unh.edu/climate_ed/sustainablebuildings.html

·         UNH Dining serves local cage-free eggs, local honey, and Fair Trade coffee; procures produce grown by the UNH Organic Garden Club; hosts an annual campus/community feast (breakfast through dinner) that showcases local food; replaced 17 traditional urinals with waterless ones; and diverts over a half million pounds of food waste via compost a year. ~ 16% of Dining's budget is spent on items grown, processed, or manufactured locally and regionally (within a 250 mile radius of UNH). sustainableunh.unh.edu/fas/unhlocalharvest.html

·         Annual Thanksgiving powerdown, dorm energy challenge, RecycleMania competition

·         Green Cleaning Program: UNH uses Green Seal® products, energy and water saving processes and machines, less-resource intensive soap dispensers, etc. UNH Housekeeping estimates that through the use of greener products, more effective cleaners, and precise dispenser systems, they have decreased the amount of cleaning product used by approximately 50% in the past 15 years..sustainableunh.unh.edu/biodiv_ed/greencleaning.html

·         New Hampshire Farm to School (NHFTS, nhfarmtoschool.org): The NH Farm to School Program connects NH farms and schools by integrating agricultural production, school food procurement, and school curriculum with the goal of developing a healthy, community-based, community-supported school food system. To date, over half of the K-12 schools in NH participate. In 2006, NHFTS initiated a new pilot program -- the Get Smart Eat Local 10-District project -- to work with school districts and farms in the seacoast region of the state to help build and strengthen direct farm-to-cafeteria relationships and introduce new local foods in the schools. The project is making direct connections between farms and ten school districts — 27 schools with over 15,000 students — in Rockingham and Strafford counties to add fresh New Hampshire-grown products to school menus.

·         Since 2006, over $100,000 in energy and water costs were avoided due to four rounds of the Student Energy Waste Watch Challenge competition among our residence halls and on-campus apartments. 

·         Since 2005, over 4.2 million trips have been made on the primarily alternative fueled Wildcat Transit system - that's over 15 million miles of private vehicle driving avoided and an estimated 5,000 metric tonnes of carbon dioxicide emissions prevented. 

·         Since summer 2005, over 980,000 pounds of food scraps from the dining halls and local Durham eateries have been composted at Kingman Farm.  That’s about 17,500 pounds each month.

·         Since the 2006, over 3,100 students from all academic disciplines have presented their scholarly and creative research at our annual Undergraduate Research Conference.  And an growing number of their research efforts have focused on sustainability – from marketing green buildings to climate action planning to issues of gender and equality, poverty and opportunity, access to healthcare and healthy foods, and much more.

 

 

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