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Report Card 2010

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University of British Columbia

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name:
Title:
Date survey submitted:


ADMINISTRATION

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES
1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy?

[  ]  No
[x]  Yes. See http://www.universitycounsel.ubc.ca/policies/policy5.pdf

2) Has the president of your institution signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)?
[ x ]  No, but we have initiated and signed onto the “University and College Presidents’ Climate Change Statement of Action for Canada.”  See http://climatechangeact.siraza.net/

The Climate Change Statement of Action for Canada does not require annual GHG reporting as mandated by the ACUPCC. Nevertheless, UBC initiated a climate action plan in the spring of 2009. This plan will establish a comprehensive inventory of UBC emissions along with reduction targets and timelines. The first report will be available in the fall of 2009 on the Climate Action Plan web site ( http://climateaction.ubc.ca ).

[  ]  Yes. If completed, please provide the date the GHG Report was submitted to the ACUPCC:

3) Has your institution signed the Talloires Declaration?
[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes

4) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan (check all that apply)?
[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes, in the master plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: http://www.campusplan.ubc.ca/process/index.php#p1

UBC is committed to a comprehensive, inclusive, and engaging consultative process for the new Vancouver Campus Plan. From June 2006 to Fall 2008, UBC will be assessing the 1992 Main Campus Plan to generate a new Campus Plan that builds on an evolving physical form and incorporates the values of Trek 2010, the University's vision statement. The UBC Vancouver Campus Plan consultation will be carried out in six phases. Further detail on each phase is available at www.campusplan.ubc.ca .

[ x ]  Yes, in the strategic plan. Please describe and provide URL, if available: Note:  Plan is under renewal, but vision, values and commitments have been finalized and reference to sustainability is found here: http://www.strategicplan.ubc.ca/vision_mission

ADVISORY COUNCIL
5) Does your school have a council or committee that advises on and/or implements policies and programs related to sustainability?

[  ]  No
[ x ]  Yes

If you answered "No" to question 5, please proceed directly to question 11.

6) Please provide the name of the committee and list the number of meetings held since August 2008.
Name: President’s Advisory Council on Sustainability (terms of reference attached)
Number of meetings: Note, this Council is composed of 7 working groups, plus a steering committee. The Steering Committee meets quarterly, the working groups meetings vary from monthly to quarterly.

7) Please provide number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

All groups are represented on the Steering Committee, as well as on each working group. The numbers vary depending on the focus of the working group. For instance, the External Advisory Council is composed of approximately 15 national and international leaders in sustainability, and is chaired by a faculty member. The Academic Working Group is composed primarily of faculty, with administrative, staff and student representation (approximately 15 in total). The Operations Working Group is composed primarily of administrators with faculty and student representation.
[#13 ]  Administrators
[#4 ]  Faculty
[#   ]  Staff
[#3 ]  Students
[#   ]  Other. Please describe:

8) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.
If 2009-2010 academic year information is not yet available, please provide information for 2008-2009 instead.
Name of chair(s): John Hepburn, Geoff Atkins
Position(s) (e.g., administrator, faculty, staff, student): VP, Research and Leader, University Sustainability

For more information, see the 2008-2009 Annual Report on Implementation of Sustainability Initiatives at the University of British Columbia Report to the UBC Board of Governors at http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/boardreport2009.pdf


9) To whom does the committee report (e.g., president, vice president)?

President

10) Please list key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2008.
Key issues/programs that the group has addressed/implemented since August 2008:
Progress made on each of these issues since August 2008:

The Climate Action Plan ( http://climateaction.ubc.ca )

The Climate Action Plan is part of UBC’s commitment to sustainability leadership and a critical step in fulfilling the University and College Presidents’ Climate Change Statement of Action for Canada. The Climate Action Plan will document measurable and achievable climate action strategies in seven areas that are the key sources of UBC’s greenhouse gas emissions (GHG). The plan, together with a management system to guide implementation, will achieve the following goals:

  • reduce UBC’s GHG footprint
  • identity strategies to mitigate risk associated with climate change
  • enhance our sustainability achievements
  • create applied learning and research opportunities on campus
  • inspire other organizations to take similar action

 

The Sustainability Academic Strategy ( www.sas.ubc.ca )

The Sustainability Academic Strategy (SAS) is prioritizing strategic recommendations within teaching and learning, research and partnerships, and operations and administration. Proposed themes of campus as a living lab and agent of change in the community are integrated into the three activities.

 

The SAS will provide a framework to guide the UBC community in ongoing planning, resource allocation and decision-making for sustainability. To capture the breadth of UBC’s academic activities related to sustainability, the SAS will also address three special projects related to sustainability: 1) Sustainability Centre UBC-Okanagan, South Campus UBC-Vancouver, and the Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) UBC-Vancouver. The SAS Working Group reports to the President’s Advisory Council – Sustainability, which is co-chaired by John Hepburn and Geoff Atkins. The SAS will continue to evolve through a “living” implementation process that fosters continuous development and refinement.


SUSTAINABILITY STAFF
11) Does your school employ sustainability staff (excluding student employees and interns)?

[  ] No
[ x ] Yes. Please provide titles and number of sustainability staff.
[12 ] Number of full-time staff (in FTE).

Titles:

Sustainability Director; Communications & Marketing Manager; Sustainability Planning/Reporting Manager; Special Projects Coordinator; Administrative Secretary; Finance Clerk

Climate and Energy Associate Director; Green Building, Sustainability Community Planning Advisor & REAP Program Manager; Climate Action Coordinator

Social Sustainability Associate Director; UBC SEEDS Program Sustainability Manager; Sustainability Coordinator Program Coordinator

[5-7 ] Number of student positions (in FTE) – Student interns at various times throughout the year.

12) Does the head of the sustainability staff report directly to the president or another high-level administrator (e.g., vice president, vice chancellor)?
[  ]  N/A
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe: Associate Vice President, Campus and Community Planning. In addition, we have a Leader, Sustainability who reports to the President.

OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT
13) Does your school have an office or department specifically dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe (including name of office or department and year created):

UBC Sustainability Office, 1998

In 1997, UBC became Canada's first university to implement a sustainable development policy. A year later, the university opened Canada's first Sustainability Office. The Office is committed to developing an environmentally responsible campus that is economically viable and reflects the values of campus community members. We are assisting UBC in assuming a leadership role through practicing sustainable development and instilling sustainable development values in its graduates and employees through research, teaching, and operations.

The Sustainability Office supports UBC’s academic mission as well as its working vision for sustainable campus operations:

 

The UBC community is leading the transformation to a comprehensive and inclusive sustainable campus demonstrating practices of local & global significance.

 

A comprehensive sustainable campus includes:

a. the integration of sustainability into operations, administration and the campus community

b. the physical and social footprint of the campus, as well as business practices

c. the academic enterprise as well as university town

d. campus community and stakeholder engagement

e. applied research and learning

f. acceleration of successful solutions beyond campus

 

WEBSITE
14) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?

[  ]  No
[  x]  Yes. Please provide URL: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca

In addition, a website is under development that will bring together the operational, research and academic sustainability activities under one communications framework. This is anticipated to be live in the fall 2009.

GREEN PURCHASING
15) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to full policy, if available:

UBC developed and implemented principles of sustainability for procurement and developed a supplier code of conduct. In addition, Supply Management Travel has reached an agreement with WestJet Airlines whereby WestJet Airlines now provides an eight per cent discount on all reservations and a further allocation of two per cent of the ticket price to purchase carbon offsets through Offsetters Climate Neutral Society. Offsetters invests in renewable energy and energy efficiency projects.

 

Two key documents guide our ethical and sustainable purchasing decisions

1.       Principles of Sustainability http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Purchase/principled%20model.pdf

2.       Supplier Code of Conduct http://www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/Supplier%20code%20ofconduct%202008%20July%2016.pdf

 

16) Does your school purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Some. Please describe: - Energy Star rated products are recommended by Supply Management.
[  ]  All

Supply management includes the above wording and has also taken to using the wording on scientific equipment as follows: It is preferred that the proposed equipment has water saving, energy conserving and other environmentally friendly features that support the University's Sustainability objectives.  Indicate in the space provided what features are included to support these objectives.  In the space provided, indicate how this specification was met.  If these are optional features please include pricing separately.

Incandescent and T12 lighting has been practically eliminated through the various campus wide retrofit projects. There are very few fixtures remaining due to extremely awkward locations. Sensors are used in hallways and bathrooms to control lighting. Street lighting is controlled by DDC (sunset/sunrise times) and light sensors. LED lighting is used for EXIT signs and a large number of vending machines operate with energy saving devices.


17) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?
[  ]  No
[  ]  Some. Please describe:
[ X ]  All. Please describe:

An example of sustainable procurement in action was Supply Management’s negotiation in 2008 with our paper supplier, Unisource, to supply UBC with 30 per cent post-consumer waste recycled paper for the same price as virgin stock. This will be the minimum acceptable standard by the B.C. government when the carbon-neutral mandate takes effect in 2010.

 

UBC Vancouver uses approximately 880,000 lbs of paper annually, and in 2007/08, 41 per cent had 30 per cent post-consumer recycled content. This contributed to the release of approximately 1,350 tonnes of GHG emissions. If UBC was to switch exclusively to 30 per cent post-consumer recycled paper, the University could save 96 tonnes of GHG emissions from entering the atmosphere. We have negotiated that 30% pcw at the same price point as virgin to ensure that the campus community source 30% pcw at the minimum. Removing the “it costs more” argument helps to drive the change in behavior. Our strategy is now focused on paper reduction in operations.

 

18) Does your school purchase Green Seal, Environmental Choice certified, or biorenewable cleaning products?
[  ]  No
[  ]  Some. Please describe:
[ X ]  All. Please describe: Green Seal is the expected standard for all janitorial supplies.

19) Are your school's computer/electronics purchase decisions made in accordance with standards such as the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Some. Please describe: IT awareness is just in the early recognition of EPEAT standards. Broader communication and Silver standard is the expectation.
[  ]  All

20) Does your school use only pesticides that meet the standards for organic crop production set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or Canadian Organic Standards (excluding on-campus farms)?
[  ]  No
[X]  Some. Please describe:
[  ]  All

Currently, UBC policy states that pests will be controlled, where necessary, with the least noxious means possible following the principles of IPM (Integrated Pest Management). The later is a commonly used approach within the landscape industry, and implies an emphasis on choosing disease resistant plants, maintaining plant and landscape health as high as possible, monitoring for early signs and symptoms, a higher public tolerance for less than pristine appearance, and responding with non-chemical or at least the least noxious method of control as a last resort. In recent years, however, UBC has gone a step further, and like it's neighbour, the City of Vancouver, has opted to suspend the use of chemical pesticides for "cosmetic" use. This means that no herbicides, insecticides of fungicides are currently used by our landscape maintenance group unless there are extenuating circumstances (i.e. public health issue, invasive plants that threaten native woodland or preservation of rare, or heritage landscape elements). This means for all intents and purposes, for day-to-day operations, we must find endeavour to find and use alternative ways to address landscape pests.

Re- insect pests and disease: Although there are a number horticultural techniques that we use to improve plant health (i.e. improvements to light, water, soil quality) plants that are irreversibly impacted by pests are often left to decline or recover on their own, and are replaced with pest resistant species wherever possible. In some cases we have tried using non-toxic sprays such as baking-soda and water on roses or Safer's Soap for aphids and the like. At UBC we are also looking at alternative landscape design and horticultural strategies that help to minimize pest and weed infestations. The only area of Campus pesticides are currently used on a regular basis is our Rose Garden. This is high-profile garden that would not survive without a regular, preventative treatment of fungicides.

Re- weed management: The greatest challenge at UBC Campus, and probably elsewhere, is the weed control portion of pest management. It is critical to understand the consequences of adopting a non-chemical approach to weed control in particular, since weeds have the most visible impact on the landscape aesthetic, and require the most significant increase in labour resources in order to switch to manually weed removal. Within our department, we have received additional funding to increase our staff by an additional 20-30% from April to August each year. Even with this significant increase, we are still challenged to keep up. We do utilize some emerging alternatives to kill or suppress weeds such as steam heat, some vinegar-based and fatty-acid based non-toxic "herbicides". The later are of limited effect however, since the most problematic weeds are perennial, with deep roots, and cannot be adequately controlled with these methods. If perennial weeds (such as morning glory) get out of control, large areas of planting often have to be removed and replaced with a more simplified approach such as lawn and trees (the weed roots will still be in the ground, but lawn-cutting allows it to be controlled to the necessary degree).

The above challenges to pest management do not preclude all other approaches to sustainable landscape design, management and development, however, this current transitional period is the most challenging in terms of public and administrative expectations, adequate funding, non-toxic alternative "pesticides", and public perceptions of what healthy landscape looks like.

 

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

 

21) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?
Please check all that apply.
[  ]  No.
[  ]  In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:
[X ]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (in metric tons of CO2e). Also, include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.

Please note that the inventory link supplied initially includes UBC Okanagan data. The UBC Vancouver Campus GHG emissions figures for 2006, 2007 and 2008, as confirmed throughout the climate action planning process, and to be released in the forthcoming climate action plan are:

 
See http://climateaction.ubc.ca/category/emission-sources

Complete (start date January 1st 2008)

Complete (start date January 1st 2007)

Complete (start date January 1st 2006)

 

Campus Climate Action Plan (http://climateaction.ubc.ca)
This year we have intensified our efforts to address climate change. Building on our pioneering programs to reduce emissions on campus, the UBC Executive has made leadership on the climate agenda a priority. In March 2008, UBC formalized this commitment by signing the President’s Statement of Action on Climate Change. This commitment dovetails with November 2007 Provincial legislation, which mandates UBC to be carbon-neutral by 2010. For now, carbon neutrality requires that we measure, reduce and offset emissions resulting from our energy consumption, fleets, buildings and paper purchasing practices.

 

The UBC Sustainability Office has established a Climate Action Team to support this priority. It will lead efforts, in collaboration with the campus community, in the preparation of a Climate Action Plan.

 

In January 2008, the Sustainability Office completed the 2006 GHG inventory report, which measured GHG emissions resulting from operations at both the Vancouver and Okanagan campuses. A technical advisory committee with expertise of faculty, staff and students provided support and guidance. We have begun our 2007 inventory. Completion is pending the release of provincially approved emissions factors.

 

In October 2008, we launched the climate action planning process with the campus community. Planning includes the development of a shared vision to guide plan goals and targets, unit-specific GHG emission reduction strategies, a climate risk assessment and the preparation of a climate management operational framework. We anticipate a draft to be completed in July 2009.

 

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION
The purchase of carbon offsets does not count toward greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for this indicator. They are counted in a subsequent indicator.


22) Has your school made a commitment to reducing GHG emissions by a specific amount?
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please list details. UBC developed a target to reduce CO2 and equivalent emissions from institutional and ancillary buildings by 25% from 2000 levels (adjusted for growth) See Inspirations and Aspirations: The Sustainability Strategy 2006-2010 ( http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/ia/UBC_Sustainability_Strategy_2007.pdf ).

 

UBC is in the process of setting targets through the development of our UBC Climate Action Plan (see www.climateaction.ubc.ca ). As the result of our ECOtrek energy and water retrofit project and other energy saving measures, UBC’s absolute GHG emissions levels are 2% below 1990 levels in 2009, despite an increase in student population and institutional floor space since 1990. During the same time period, Province of BC’s GHG emissions increased 27% between 1990-2004.

If you answered only "No" or "In progress" to question 21, please now skip to question 27.

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS
23) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions?
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. UBC has avoided significant GHG emissions through a series of energy and water retrofit projects (~11,000 tonnes/yr) related to core academic buildings at UBC-V.


Percentage reduced: 0% growth

Baseline year: 1990
Date achieved: Current (2009)

UBC’s goal is to reduce CO2 and equivalent emissions from institutional and ancillary buildings from 2000 levels (adjusted for growth)

2005-2006 – 22% reduction

2006-2007 – 24% reduction

2007-2008 – 26% reduction

The provincial government has enacted legislation that requires post-secondary institutions to be ‘carbon-neutral’ by 2010. Institutions with excess carbon emissions will be required to pay a per-tonne offset charge to the Pacific Carbon Trust, which will then invest those funds in offset programs. Despite the University’s significant reductions to date, this represents a substantial and ongoing financial liability for the University. Considerable effort is thus being directed to cost-effective efforts to further reduce UBC’s carbon footprint at both campuses.

Highlights for 2009 include:

  • The Alternative Energy Sources Project, a comprehensive study examining a wide range of alternatives to the current methods of supplying energy for campus activities, with a major focus on reducing or replacing the gas-fired boilers used for space and process heat on campus, and which are the major source of GHG / carbon emissions.
  • Energy retrofits in selected ancillary buildings (ECOTrek Phase 2), and to aggressively pursue additional ways to reduce our energy use through business practices and behaviour change initiatives.
  • Phase 2 of UBC Renew is underway. In a 2008 study commissioned by the Sustainability Office, the green architecture firm Busby, Perkins + Will noted that although it is essential for UBC to incorporate green standards into new buildings on our campuses, the biggest gains in the quest for carbon neutrality are to be made by refurbishing existing core building stock.
  • Enhancements to UBC’s Technical Guidelines for new construction and renovation projects.

 

ECOTrek (http://www.ecotrek.ubc.ca)

Launched in 2001, ECOTrek was conceived as the largest energy and water infrastructure retrofit ever to have taken place on a Canadian campus. In the four years prior to the start of this project, UBC’s utility costs had doubled as the result of climbing energy prices. The goal was to reduce energy and water consumption in core academic buildings along with associated GHG emissions. That goal was achieved in spades. In addition, ECOTrek provided a mechanism to fund facility renewal, which had been increasingly deferred. In the same manner, the project funded utility management infrastructure (such as meters) as critical to effective management, but with a very long return on investment. ECOTrek was a $39-million investment in energy and water savings and infrastructure renewal.

 

In order to minimize the financial risk to the University, UBC entered into an energy performance contract with an Energy Service Company (ESCO), MCW Custom Energy Solutions Ltd. MCW undertook energy audits of 288 campus buildings. Reductions in water and energy use were targeted at 30 per cent and 20 per cent respectively (adjusted for campus growth), along with the associated GHG emissions. The cost for implementing the identified energy conservation measures was budgeted at $39 million, a little more than double UBC’s annual $17-million energy bill. BC Hydro provided incentives totaling nearly $4 million, contingent on realizing the projected electricity savings. The remainder of the project was funded by a loan from the University, to be repaid over a 24-year period out of the guaranteed annual utility savings of at least $2.6 million. ECOTrek also pursued savings through a series of soft measures, including general maintenance related issues and staff and student awareness programs. These measures complemented UBC’s goals of institutionalizing sustainability within the university community.

 

In 2007/2008 construction on these measures was completed, and a monitoring and verification report was produced to ensure that the promised energy savings would materialize. The report is being verified by BC Hydro and the Sustainability Office. In 2007/2008, total CO 2 and equivalent emissions from buildings has been reduced by 26 per cent per square meter from 2000 levels. Non-renewable energy consumption in institutional buildings adjusted for growth stands at a 23 per cent reduction against 2000 levels. The program also involved retrofitting the boilers in our steam plant. This resulted in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions being 86 per cent lower in 2006 than in 2000. In addition, the ECOTrek program eliminated an estimated $20 million from UBC’s accumulated deferred maintenance debt.

 
24) Please provide the total heating and cooling degree days averaged over the past three years.
Data on total degree heating and cooling days is available at: http://www.degreedays.net/ . This information will be used to help reduce bias between schools in different climates.

Using 18 C as the Base Temperature
Cooling degree days average over the past three years: 51.5
Heating degree days average over the past three years: 2979.7


25) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-thousand-square-foot basis for the past three years.
Per-Thousand-Square-Foot Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space in thousands of square feet.
2008: 4.52

2007: 4.46

2006: 4.46


26) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-full-time-student basis for the past three years.
Per-Student Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time enrolled students.

Tonnes
2008: 59,510

2007: 58,744

2006: 58,793

 

FTE

2008: 37,589

2007: 38,590

2006: 37,589

 

Tonnes/FTE

2008: 1.58

2007: 1.52

2006: 1.56


ENERGY EFFICIENCY
27) What programs or technologies has your school implemented to improve energy efficiency (e.g., cogeneration plant, retrocommissioning of HVAC systems, performing system tune-ups, temperature setbacks)?
 

A series of comprehensive energy and water retrofit projects have been completed at UBC. The measures addressed lighting, HVAC, building automation (scheduling of building systems), steam system efficiency, water fixtures and sub-metering (http://www.ecotrek.ubc.ca/). 40 GWh of electrical energy, 1,300,000 cubic meters of water and 150,000 GJ of Steam consumption has been conserved per annum.

ECOTrek (http://www.ecotrek.ubc.ca)

Launched in 2001, ECOTrek was conceived as the largest energy and water infrastructure retrofit ever to have taken place on a Canadian campus. In the four years prior to the start of this project, UBC’s utility costs had doubled as the result of climbing energy prices. The goal was to reduce energy and water consumption in core academic buildings along with associated GHG emissions. That goal was achieved in spades. In addition, ECOTrek provided a mechanism to fund facility renewal, which had been increasingly deferred. In the same manner, the project funded utility management infrastructure (such as meters) critical to effective management, but which have a very long return on investment. ECOTrek was a $39-million investment in energy and water savings and infrastructure renewal.

 

In order to minimize the financial risk to the University, UBC entered into an energy performance contract with an Energy Service Company (ESCO), MCW Custom Energy Solutions Ltd. MCW undertook energy audits of 288 campus buildings. Reductions in water and energy use were targeted at 30 per cent and 20 per cent respectively (adjusted for campus growth), along with the associated GHG emissions. The cost for implementing the identified energy conservation measures was budgeted at $39 million, a little more than double UBC’s annual $17-million energy bill. BC Hydro provided incentives totaling nearly $4 million, contingent on realizing the projected electricity savings. The remainder of the project was funded by a loan from the University, to be repaid over a 24-year period out of the guaranteed annual utility savings of at least $2.6 million.  In fact UBC routinely exceeded those savings. ECOTrek also pursued savings through a series of soft measures, including general maintenance related issues and staff and student awareness programs. These measures complemented UBC’s goals of institutionalizing sustainability within the university community.

 

In 2007/2008 construction on these measures was completed, and a monitoring and verification report was produced to ensure that the promised energy savings would materialize. The report is being verified by BC Hydro and the Sustainability Office. In 2007/2008, total CO 2 and equivalent emissions from buildings has been reduced by 26 per cent per square meter from 2000 levels. Non-renewable energy consumption in institutional buildings adjusted for growth stands at a 23 per cent reduction against 2000 levels. The program also involved retrofitting the boilers in our steam plant. This has resulted in nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions being 86 per cent lower in 2006 than in 2000. In addition, the ECOTrek program eliminated an estimated $20 million from UBC’s accumulated deferred maintenance debt.

 

Energy Management

Our approach to energy management has two focus areas. We reduce energy consumption through behaviour change and through technology. Our programs include the following three initiatives:

 

1) Energy Dashboard Pilot Program 

With support from University Investment Fund (UIF) funding ($50,000), Phase 1 of this program provided the occupants of five UBC-V campus buildings with their building’s real-time energy statistics, including real-world conversions, through a website. Analysis indicated that the pilot was successful in terms of engaging building occupants and raising awareness of energy consumption. The macro level metering could not be expected to show an impact on energy conservation. Phase 2 will examine the use of a more complex suite of web-based energy management software to allow proactive energy management strategies to help operations personnel reduce building energy consumption. On completion, a business case will be evaluated for rolling out the technology to all campus buildings.

 

2) Continuous Optimization

UBC is part of a BC Hydro pilot program designed to examine the concept of continuously optimizing building operation systems, such as HVAC, to conserve energy. The pilot involves auditing and retrofitting two campus buildings and monitoring the energy savings over a three-year period. The pilot will allow UBC to evaluate another example of energy management software.

 

3) Kill-a-Watt Meter

The UBC Library and the Sustainability Office partnered a pilot project offering 10 Kill-a-Watt meters to the campus community. The Kill-a-Watt meter is a small hand-held device that plugs into an electricity socket at one end and a household appliance at the other. The meter displays the real-time energy consumption of the appliance. One application is to assess the energy efficiency of appliances in sleep mode and use the information to help make personal energy reduction choices. The meters are available to UBC students, faculty and staff from the Koerner, Irving K Barber and Woodward libraries.


ENERGY CONSERVATION
28) Do you facilitate programs that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use (e.g., cash incentives, signs reminding individuals to turn off lights and appliances)?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe:

SEEDS (SOCIAL, ECOLOGICAL, ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT STUDIES) at UBC–V

The Social, Ecological, Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) program is western Canada’s only academic program bringing together students, faculty, and staff in projects that address sustainability issues. Now in its eighth year, SEEDS has attracted more than 2,800 participants. SEEDS has experienced a 57 per cent growth in the number of SEEDS papers since 2004-2005 and has made significant contributions to advancing sustainability on campus. More than 50 per cent of 2007-2008 projects will be implemented and/or will affect decision making at UBC.

 

In 2008, the Sustainability Office received Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund support, which included $20,000 in funding for SEEDS climate change projects. The program was also recognized with an award from Student Development for contributing to the lives and learning of students (prize of $500). In addition, SEEDS continues to receive recognition for winning the national second prize Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO) Award in June 2007 (prize of $5,000).

 

This year, the Sustainability Office initiated the first external SEEDS project. The project involves a student and a professor from the School of Community and Regional Planning in research supporting the Strathcona Business Improvement Society and its vision to create a Green Zone in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. We hope to have a greater number of SEEDS off-campus projects in the future.

 

The Climate Action Symposium

In response to the expressed desire of researchers and faculty to come together to share knowledge and practice, the Sustainability Office and the Office of the Provost/VP Academic co-hosted the Climate Action Symposium in October 2008. It attracted a capacity audience of 245 people from the UBC community and presenters from 18 different departments, units and community groups.

 

This year’s Climate Action Symposium successfully met the following goals:

·     To foster learning and dialogue regarding UBC’s search for climate change solutions;

·     To inform the campus community about UBC’s Climate Action Framework; and

·     To strengthen purpose and community in UBC’s efforts to innovate and incubate climate change solutions.

 

Symposium participants overwhelmingly expressed a desire for an annual campus sustainability symposium. They noted the importance of communicating across disciplines and units as we build a campus community with sustainability at the forefront.

 

GoBEYOND

The UBC Sustainability Office is one of three partners in the goBEYOND project, a B.C. student network that educates and builds capacity for students across the province to move themselves and their communities beyond climate-neutral. The program was piloted at UBC, University of Victoria and Thomson Rivers University and has expanded to 9 other B.C. institutions in 2009. Funded by the B.C. government, BC Hydro and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions for more than $150,000, the youth-led program engages students to make carbon-smart lifestyle choices through lectures, workshops and presentations, and challenges students to take climate action. To date, the project has reached more than 84,000 youth across the province through its programming. The fall and spring teach-in engaged more than 20,000 students, 400 professors and 21 institutions in a province-wide in-class discussion on climate action. At UBC’s Vancouver and Okanagan campuses, more than 17,000 students have been made aware of, or participated in, the project.

 

Sustainability Coordinators (http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/sc.html)

UBC’s Sustainability Coordinators (SC) volunteer to work within their departments to inspire colleagues to make environmentally sustainable behaviour changes. The program includes a network of 147 faculty and staff who foster a sustainable culture throughout the University. The energy conservation efforts of the Sustainability Coordinators save UBC $75,000 per year. The program builds a sense of community and improves workplace satisfaction. In the most recent survey, 96 per cent of SCs found the program enriching and would recommend it to a friend.

 

Results from our summer 2008 survey indicate that in the 2007/08 school year, 63 per cent of SCs implemented the Energy Reduction campaign, 54 per cent implemented the Transportation Alternatives campaign, and 61 per cent implemented the Materials Reduction campaign. The Sustainability Office in partnership with Supply Management released a new sustainability purchasing toolkit in January 2009.

 

A goal at UBC is to demonstrate and recognize sustainable practices in the workplace and in student living represented by growth in the Sustainability Coordinators program.

 

2004-05: 140 Sustainability Coordinators

2005-06: 140 Sustainability Coordinators

2006-07: 141 Sustainability Coordinators

2007-08: 146 Sustainability Coordinators

2008-09: 150 Sustainability Coordinators

 
RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION
29)  Does your school generate renewable electricity?

[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please specify percentage of overall electricity generated from each of the following sources and describe details below.
[    %]  B100 biodiesel
[    %]  Clean biomass
[    %]  Concentrating solar power (CSP)
[    %]  Geothermal
[    %]  Low-impact hydropower
[    %]  Solar photovoltaics
[    %]  Wind
[ 85%]  Other

Description: Percentage of overall campus energy consumption is negligible. However, BC power is 85% renewable energy generated (hydro power). Passive geothermal is used at Regent College and geothermal is also used by some new residential buildings on campus.

 

UBC Properties Trust completed Clement’s Green in 2006. Clement’s Green is UBC staff and faculty owned in the Hawthorn Place neighbourhood, and features a geoexchange hot water preheat system.

 

Adera is the first developer to achieve REAP Gold at UBC with Pathways. Pathways is under construction in the Wesbrook Place neighbourhood, and will feature a solar hot water preheat system.

 

Campus-wide Geoexchange System – UBC-O
UBC-O’s campus-wide geoexchange system is projected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 88 per cent, or 2,959 tonnes per year, equivalent to taking 14,000 cars off the road over the next two decades. The cost avoidance for UBC Okanagan's complete geoexchange heating and cooling system — which takes the place of traditional natural gas systems — will be an estimated $610,000 per year, offsetting the total project’s capital cost in 10 years.

 
30)  Does your school have solar hot water systems?
[X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please specify number of systems and total BTUs generated annually, if available:

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE
31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?

RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standard.
[X]  No. However, BC power is 85-90% renewable energy generated (Hydro power).
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (kWh):
Percentage of your total electric energy use that it represents:

32) Has your school purchased non-electric energy from renewable sources?
[X]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (BTUs):
Percentage of your total non-electric energy use that it represents:

Alternative Energy – UBC-V
This year the UBC Executive endorsed plans for The Alternative Energy Sources Project (AESP). This project will be the first step in economically transforming the UBC Vancouver campus into a global showcase for sustainability. The AES will identify and implement the most cost-effective options for alternative energy supplies, ultimately replacing the UBC steam heating system. The existing system burns natural gas to produce steam heat for most of the campus’ 259 core buildings (758,000 sq. m of academic space). It comprises of four boilers, two of which have a remaining expected useful life of seven to 10 years. Our 2006 GHG emissions assessment calculates the steam system’s carbon footprint at almost 58,000 tonnes per annum, which is the largest single source of GHG emissions on campus. This represents an estimated financial liability of up to $1.7 million by 2010 when we anticipate paying $25 per tonne for carbon offsets associated with carbon neutrality.

 

The Alternative Energy Sources Project is a significant step towards achieving the University’s sustainability aspirations. Additionally, the AESP will also contribute to UBC’s aspirations to showcase the UBC - Vancouver as the world’s first net positive energy and water campus. Submissions for a Request for Proposals for an alternative energy feasibility study for UBC Vancouver are currently under review, with a selected consultant expected later in 2009.

 

Campus-wide Geoexchange System – UBC-O
UBC-O’s campus-wide geoexchange system is projected to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by more than 88 per cent, or 2,959 tonnes per year, equivalent to taking 14,000 cars off the road over the next two decades. The cost avoidance for UBC Okanagan's complete geoexchange heating and cooling system — which takes the place of traditional natural gas systems — will be an estimated $610,000 per year, offsetting the total project’s capital cost in 10 years.

 

UBC Renew (http://www.lbs.ubc.ca/renew/UBC_Renew_HC_06.pdf)
UBC Renew has completed seven [1] out of the 10 buildings targeted for Phase 1 on schedule and on budget of project stakeholders.

 
By completion of Phase 1, UBC Renew – a project that renovates rather than demolishes aging infrastructure at UBC-V – will have avoided $89 million in new construction costs, saved 97 million MJ of primary energy, 27 million litres of water, 3.2 million kWh of electricity, and 492 tonnes of coal. It will prevent the emission of 6,150 tonnes of greenhouse gases, divert 1,458 tonnes of construction waste from landfill, and eliminate $77.4 million from UBC’s accumulated deferred maintenance debt, which currently stands at $548.2 million.

 

In 2008, the Chemistry Centre and Friedman were completed and occupied. Buchanan B and the Old Auditorium are under construction. Buchanan A's construction drawings are 95 per cent complete in preparation for tender. UBC Chemistry Centre re-opened in March 2008 after 14 months of closure. The 1923 heritage building is the centre piece of the Chemistry complex and is the most significant building to be revitalized under UBC Renew. The distinctive architectural details were intact, but the building was in desperate need of life safety upgrades and could no longer support chemistry research. UBC Renew’s economic, ecological and social analysis determined that the building qualified for renewal.

 

Scheduled for completion under the UBC Renew Phase 2 program, the UBC Biological Sciences Building offers an installation opportunity for a relatively new UBC invention - the solar canopy. This technology provides daylight to the core of multi-floor buildings in order to reduce the need for electrical lighting. It is currently being piloted at a BCIT installation.


ON-SITE COMBUSTION
33) Please provide total BTUs of energy for heating and cooling from on-site combustion:

771,479 GJ

7.31221E+11 Btu

 
34) Please list each fuel source (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil) and the percent of overall BTUs derived from that source:

UBC-V % fuel usage (2006)

Percent

GJ

GWh

Btu

Natural gas

56%

1282363

356

1.22E+12

Electric

42%

956973.6

266

9.07E+11

Oil

0.28%

6424.16

2

6.089E+09

Fleet

1%

33790.24

9

3.20E+10

Total

 

2279551

633

2.16E+12

 

See http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/pdfs/2006UBC_GHG.pdf

 

35) Is any on-site combustion for heating and cooling derived from renewable sources?
[X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.

Percentage on-site combustion derived from renewable sources: [   %]
Total BTUs of energy generated from renewable sources: [#      ]
Description of renewable energy sources used for on-site combustion for heating and cooling:

FOOD & RECYCLING
The food portion of this category is covered in a separate dining survey.

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS
36) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles (check all that apply).

[  ]  None
[X ]  Aluminum
[X ]  Cardboard
[X ]  Glass
[X ]  Paper
[X ]  Plastics (all) #1-7
[  ]  Plastics (some)
[X]  Other. Please list: Juice boxes

37) Diversion rate: [ 44%]

UBC’s goal is to divert 55% of annual operational waste from the landfill (by 2010):

Recent trend data:

2005-2006 – 41% reduction

2006-2007 – 46% reduction

2007-2008 – 44% reduction

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE
38) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?

[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. If available, please indicate the total annual weight or volume of each material collected for recycling or reuse.
[ X ]  Batteries
[ X ]  Cell phones
[ X ]  Computers
[ X ]  Lightbulbs
[X ]  Printer cartridges
[X ]  Other E-waste. Please list: http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/recycling.htm

Fluorescent tubes and batteries are sent to off-campus facilities that recycle the materials ensure that we do not further contribute to the landfill mass. Other items, such as office furniture can be collected for reuse. Cleaned Styrofoam egg cartons, on the other hand, are collected for reuse by the UBC Farm. Digitech Laser (a Vancouver based company that re-manufactures used laser printer cartridges) has just started to pilot a Cartridge Round-Up to pick up used ink and laser toner cartridges free for proper recycling.

UBC Waste Management takes campus e-waste Encorp Pacific (Canada). UBC Waste Management takes campus e-waste to Encorp Pacific (Canada) for recycling of 'Stewardship Program items' (see below), to E-cycle Solutions for recycling of 'non-Stewardship Program items', and to Free Geek (Vancouver) for re-use when possible. Encorp Pacific processes e-waste to reclaim raw materials such as glass, metals, and plastics, with all recycling operations taking place in Canada. For more information on their recycling process, please visit: 'The Electronics Recycling Process'. E-Cycle Solutions is an e-waste recycler that works under the ESABC Stewardship Program, with the ability to recycle electronic items that cannot be recycled through Encorp Pacific. (See http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/ewaste.htm )


COMPOSTING (ASIDE FROM DINING FACILITIES)
39) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

[100%]

70% of UBC's waste stream can be composted or recycled. UBC produces about 1900 tonnes of compostable waste each year including: food waste, residual paper products, animal bedding, animal waste, wood, yard waste and sawdust (http://www.recycle.ubc.ca/compost.htm).

UBC boasts Canada’s first university in-vessel composter, which has been in operation at UBC-V since 2004. By digesting up to 350 tonnes of waste a year, the composter turns organic waste into nutrient-rich soil that is used to enhance landscaping on campus. As of this year, Food Services provide biodegradable hot beverage cups, plates, napkins, and cutlery, as well as organic waste collection bins in all of its outlets across campus. Furthermore, customers receive a 15-cent discount if they use their own mug or food container. Since its launch in 2003, the One Less Cup initiative has resulted in a 20 per cent reduction in paper cups annually. In addition, UBC Waste Management captures and recycles more than 36 tonnes of electronic waste annually under B.C.’s Electronic Product Stewardship Plan, which ensures that all e-waste is recycled in North America in a responsible manner. Overall, UBC diverts 45 per cent (1678 tons) of its waste into recycling and composting programs, and aims to divert 55 per cent (2051 tons) by 2010.

 

UBC Okanagan food services provider Aramark has changed its practices to support sustainability. It now uses environmentally friendly cleaning products and has switched to biodegradable garbage bags that decompose in 60 days. Aramark has also implemented an aggressive recycling program for all bottles, glass, plastic, metal, and cardboard. In the spirit of social responsibility, the money from recycling pop bottles and cans is donated to the Kelowna and District Society for Community Living.


40) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe:

UBC offers composting at various academic buildings on campus. There are also fifteen participating residential buildings in the University Neighbourhood Association (UNA) part of a joint UNA/UBC Composting Project ( http://www.myuna.ca/Services/Waste_Disposal/Composting_Service.html )

 

SOURCE REDUCTION
41) Do you have any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe:

Waste Management is also responsible for the Surplus Equipment Recycling Facility (SERF) for low-end value equipment. This involves storing and re-distributing surplus supplies and office furniture on campus and includes equipment such as desks, chairs, tables, bookshelves and filing cabinets (see http://www.serf.ubc.ca/EIS/Serf/index.htm ).

 

GREEN BUILDING

GREEN BUILDING POLICY
42) Does your school have a formal green building policy?

[ ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

Vancouver Campus Plan

The Vancouver Campus Plan process has successfully incorporated sustainability principles into consultation events over the past year. In June 2008, for example, Campus & Community Planning hosted three policy roundtables: The 2010 Carbon Neutral Target (co-hosted with the Sustainability Office); On-Campus Student Housing; and Food Security. The roundtables were well attended, with proceedings being considered during Phase 5, the next phase of the planning process. In Phase 4, Campus & Community Planning developed a workbook as part of the consultation on campus plan options. The workbook incorporated criteria for working towards sustainability and a low-carbon campus. This includes:

 

  • All residential construction must comply with REAP, UBC’s Residential Environmental Assessment Program: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/greenbuilding.html
  • All institutional construction must comply with the UBC Technical Guidelines, which incorporates sustainability requirements: http://www.technicalguidelines.ubc.ca/
  • Aging academic buildings in the UBC Renew program are renovated and certified as LEED Silver
  • Also, as per Province of British Columbia requirements, all government buildings are to achieve LEED Gold certification

 

UBC-O Campus Guidelines toward Sustainability

Ongoing dialogue concerning the UBC Okanagan Campus Guidelines aims to direct the future growth of the campus so that the footprint of the buildings is minimized and the natural spaces, including the pine forest and iconic Okanagan grasslands, are protected.


GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS
43) Please indicate LEED-certified buildings.

[# 2    ]  Total number of LEED-certified buildings.
[    sq ft]  Certified-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Silver-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[607,986 sq ft]  Gold-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: Life Sciences Centre; Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory
[    sq ft]  Platinum-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

 

Registered with Canada Green Building Council, certification pending:

New construction:

Centre for Interactive Research on Sustainability; LEED Platinum/Living Building Challenge

Major Renovations:

Chemistry Centre: 77,000 sq ft; LEED Silver

Buchanan Buildings B,C and D: 151,000 sq ft; LEED Silver

Friedman Building: 68,000 sq ft; LEED Gold

LEED for Neighbourhood Development Pilot Program

The US Green Building Council selected UBC-V’s Wesbrook Place neighborhood plan to participate in the LEED for Neighborhood Development pilot program. The LEED-ND Rating System integrates the principles of smart growth, new urbanism, and green building into the first national standard for neighborhood design, and is anticipated to receive the same level of recognition and use as the LEED for buildings rating system. Staff from UBC Properties Trust, Campus & Community Planning and the Sustainability Office will work together on the submission. UBC has already received recognition for its leadership in the realm of green buildings, due in part to the exposure that accompanies certifying both new construction and major renovations under the LEED system. Similarly, LEED certification of neighborhood designs will provide independent, third-party verification that a development’s location and design meet accepted high standards for environmentally responsible development.

 

University Investment Fund Project: LEED for Existing Buildings

In February 2008, the Sustainability Office was awarded $99,000 from the University Investment Fund. The award is funding an investigation into the effectiveness of green building rating systems at helping UBC achieve its greenhouse gas reduction goals. Phase 1 of the project, now complete, was a review of green building rating systems and a recommendation for moving campus buildings to carbon neutrality. Green architecture firm Busby Perkins + Will completed the study and pointed out that over the next decade, planned new construction and major renovations at UBC will constitute just nine per cent of the total building stock. In other words, UBC will need to focus its efforts on improving the energy performance of its existing buildings – not just new construction. Phase 2 of the project will pilot one or more green building rating systems for existing buildings applied to a test building.


44) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED certification criteria but are not certified.
[#      ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria
[    sq ft]  Certified-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[ 823,000 sq ft] Silver-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: ICICS, IK Barber, Michael Smith, Facility for Proteomics, Sauder School of Business, Meekison Centre, Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre and Chemistry North renovation

[ sq ft] Gold-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[ 22,400 sq ft] Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names: Centre for Engineering Design

 

Residential Environmental Assessment Program (REAP)

REAP is a made-at-UBC green building rating system that is mandatory for all residential construction in UBC-V’s University Town neighbourhoods. REAP was developed to answer the need for a rating system that could be applied to all residential construction types planned for the campus. The Provincial Office of Housing and Construction Standards recently added new green requirements for energy and water efficiency to the B.C. Building Code. In response to these changes, an updated version came into effect in January 2009 and help UBC retain its leadership position in green building.


45) Please indicate buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[N/A]  Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings. Please list building names:
[    sq ft] Combined gross square footage.

Energy Star is a US-based program and the Canadian equivalent has not yet been established.

 

Residential Environmental Assessment Program (REAP)

REAP is a made-at-UBC green building rating system that is mandatory for all residential construction in UBC-V’s University Town neighbourhoods. REAP was developed to answer the need for a rating system that could be applied to all residential construction types planned for the campus. The Provincial Office of Housing and Construction Standards recently added new green requirements for energy and water efficiency to the B.C. Building Code. In response to these changes, an updated version came into effect in January 2009 and help UBC retain its leadership position in green building.


RENOVATIONS AND RETROFITS
46) Please indicate LEED-EB certified buildings.

[N/A]  Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings. Please list building names:
[    sq ft] Combined gross square footage.
We are waiting for a Canadian version of LEED-EB

We have two buildings registered with another rating system for existing buildings, BOMA BESt http://www.bomabest.com/

BOMA BESt Certification is pending for the Neville Scarfe Complex and Buchanan Tower

Combined gross square footage: 325,474


47) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified.
[N/A]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified. Please list building names:
[    sq ft] Combined gross square footage.

LEED-EB is not yet available in Canada. UBC has not assessed any of its buildings against LEED-EB criteria.


48) Please indicate renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[N/A]  Total number of renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled. Please list building names:
[    sq ft] Combined gross square footage.
Energy Star is a US-based program and the Canadian equivalent has not yet been established.

49) What energy-efficiency technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., HVAC systems, motion sensors, ambient light sensors, T5 lighting, LED lighting, timers, laundry technology)?
For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of maintained building space have been retrofitted with motion sensors; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data)

 

ECOTrek (http://www.ecotrek.ubc.ca/)

As part of the ECOTrek program mentioned previously, the University of British Columbia was able to undertake the enormous energy and water savings initiative that took place over a period of three years through a cost recoverable method known as Energy Performance Contracting. MCW undertook energy audits of 288 campus buildings. Reductions in water and energy use were targeted at 30 per cent and 20 per cent respectively (adjusted for campus growth), along with the associated GHG emissions. The cost for implementing the identified energy conservation measures was budgeted at $39 million, a little more than double UBC’s annual $17-million energy bill. BC Hydro provided incentives totaling nearly $4 million, contingent on realizing the projected electricity savings. The remainder of the project was funded by a loan from the University, to be repaid over a 24-year period out of the guaranteed annual utility savings of at least $2.6 million.  In fact UBC routinely exceeded those savings. ECOTrek also pursued savings through a series of soft measures, including general maintenance related issues and staff and student awareness programs. Activities include:

-        Night time set back and system scheduling based on the classroom occupancy schedules are used to regulate temperature.

-       Sensors used in hallways and bathrooms to control lighting. Street lighting is controlled by DDC (sunset/sunrise times) and light sensors, and LED lighting is used for EXIT signs. A large number of vending machines operate with energy saving devices

-        Incandescent and T12 lighting has been practically eliminated through the various campus wide retrofit projects. There are very few fixtures remaining due to extremely awkward locations.

See estimated electricity consumption at UBC Vancouver Campus since September 1, 2007 and resource savings since April 1, 1999 ( http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/ ).

 

50) What water-conservation technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., low-flow faucets, low-flow showerheads, waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, gray water systems, laundry technology)?
For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of the maintained building space have been retrofitted with low-flow faucets; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).

UBC Renew (http://www.lbs.ubc.ca/renew/UBC_Renew_HC_06.pdf)
UBC Renew has completed seven [2] out of the 10 buildings targeted for Phase 1 on schedule, on budget and to the satisfaction of all project stakeholders.


By completion of Phase 1, UBC Renew – a project that renovates rather than demolishes aging infrastructure at UBC-V – will have avoided $89 million in new construction costs, saved 97 million MJ of primary energy, 27 million litres of water, 3.2 million kWh of electricity, and 492 tonnes of coal. It will prevent the emission of 6,150 tonnes of greenhouse gases, divert 1,458 tonnes of construction waste from landfill, and eliminate $77.4 million from UBC’s accumulated deferred maintenance debt, which currently stands at $548.2 million.

 

In 2008, the Chemistry Centre and Friedman were completed and occupied. Buchanan B and the Old Auditorium are under construction. Buchanan A's construction drawings are 95 per cent complete in preparation for tender. UBC Chemistry Centre re-opened in March 2008 after 14 months of closure. The 1923 heritage building is the center piece of the Chemistry complex and, to date is the most significant building to be revitalized under UBC Renew. The distinctive architectural details were intact, but the building was in desperate need of life safety upgrades, and could no longer support today’s chemistry research. UBC Renew’s economic, ecological and social analysis determined that the building qualified for renewal.

 

Scheduled for completion under the UBC Renew Phase 2 program, the UBC Biological Sciences Building offers an installation opportunity for a relatively new UBC invention - the solar canopy. This technology provides daylight to the core of multi-floor buildings in order to reduce the need for electrical lighting, and is currently being trialed at a BCIT installation.

 

See estimated water consumption at UBC Vancouver Campus, since September 1, 2007, and resource savings, since April 1, 1999 ( http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/ ).

 

The UBC Renew project has addressed water conservation issues in each of the buildings. However, the major water conservation project at UBC Vancouver campus was the ECOTrek project. Detailed information follows:

The ECOTrek project addressed over 6.7 million square feet of building space- over 300 buildings total, including 80 large buildings. In each of these buildings, a number of changes were made to basins, toilets, urinals and water-cooled equipment to reduce the amount of water used on campus. The largest component of this measure was the retrofit of continually flushing urinals with motion sensors that reduce the number of flushes. In addition, the University’s main data and computing centre in the Klinck Building is being upgraded to reduce water use, as well as improve reliability through a generator upgrade.

 

The detailed information on the ECOTrek project water conservation measures, including data measures is as follows:

 

Measure C2: Condensate Pipe Replacement consisted of the replacement of leaking and abandoned below grade and above grade (in buildings) condensate lines.

 

Measure H7: Installation of a chemical additive that helped prevent evaporation.

 

Measure M1: Domestic Water Upgrades consisted of retrofitting the vast majority of plumbing fixtures on the core campus with low consumption technologies:

 

Kitchen Sinks: 832

Faucets: 2

Bathroom sinks: 1,470

Toilet tanks: 246

Toilet flush valves: 1,360

Urinal tanks: 191

Urinal flush valves: 160

Shower heads: 66

 

Measure S3: Chemistry South Aspirators consisted of the installation of 24 new aspirator pump systems to replace the existing domestic water fed aspirators in Chemistry South Building #148.

 

Measure S4: Klinck Building Closed Loop Computer Room Cooling consisted of the installation of a closed loop cooling system to feed condenser water to the computer room air-conditioning (CRAC) units. These CRAC units previously used once-through use domestic water. This closed loop system replaced the domestic water feeds and conserved this once-through water usage.

 

Water Conservation Measures have also been put in place at the UBC Okanagan campuses:

 

Irrigation Systems

 

UBC-O

Target: Phase in computerized irrigation system that reduces water usage by 30% at UBC Okanagan by 2010. Results: Phase I in place - reduces water demand by 50% from 19 million liters a month to 10 million liters a month.

 

Technology that works with the Okanagan climate ensures that campus irrigation systems are used only when conditions require it.  Xeriscape landscaping reduces the reliance on irrigation by working with plants that creatively and strategically complement the Okanagan’s natural environment. The xeriscape concept of appropriate plant selection has the added benefit of reducing fertilizer and pesticide use. To reduce irrigation demands even further, artificial turf will replace the natural turf sports field on campus, which, as an added bonus, extends the playing season for UBC Okanagan athletes and students.

 

Drinking Water

Each non-residence water fountain on campus has been equipped with a Granular Activated Carbon water filter to decrease the usage of bottled water and improve the taste of campus water.

In addition, the UBC Students' Union Okanagan (UBCSUO) and UBC Okanagan Facilities have partnered to install a top-of-the-line water-dispensing unit in the main entrance of the Sciences Building. The PENTEK FreshPoint Ultrafiltration System is an advanced point of entry (POE) treatment device that improves water quality while preserving its beneficial minerals. UBC Okanagan is the first site in North America to install the ground-breaking system, which is extremely energy efficient. The $10,000 cost was shared equally between the UBCSUO and the UBC Okanagan Facilities department.


51) What percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste is diverted from landfills?
[     %] not available


Waste diversion rates from institutional construction:

Progress has been reported on LEED certified buildings, including the Aquatic Ecosystems Research Laboratory and Life Sciences Centre both achieving 75% waste diversion and verified by the Canada and US Green Building Councils.

 

Waste diversion rates from residential construction:

75% waste diversion is mandatory and is verified by the Sustainability Office through the REAP certification process.

 
STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES
52) Are there any sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school?

[ X]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Name of program:
Type of community (e.g., hall, building, house):
Number of students involved:
Additional details:

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
53) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe how sustainability is incorporated (e.g., information sessions, green tour):

The UBC Sustainability Office works to integrate sustainability into student, staff and faculty orientations. For students, we provide information at their two major annual orientation events and useful resources, such as our sustainable event protocol. This year, 5,000 first-year students each received a reusable mug that included information on how to reduce their carbon footprint at UBC. In addition, the Sustainability Office provides information to new faculty and staff at regular orientation sessions.


INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES
54) Does your school offer on-campus office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please provide number of students and average number of hours worked weekly per student:

[10 ] Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 12 - 15 hours/week during the year, and higher during the summer. Interns work in the UBC Sustainability Office, TREK Transportation Demand Management Program Centre, UBC Alma Mater Society and Waste Management.

[#     ]  Unpaid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:

SEEDS (social, ecological, economic development studies) at UBC–V
SEEDS is western Canada’s only academic program bringing together students, faculty, and staff in projects that address sustainability issues. Now in its eighth year, SEEDS has attracted more than 2,800 participants.

 

In 2008, the Sustainability Office received Teaching and Learning Enhancement Fund support, which included $20,000 in funding for SEEDS climate change projects. The program was also recognized with an award from Student Development for contributing to the lives and learning of students (prize of $500).  In addition, SEEDS continues to receive recognition for winning the national second prize Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO) Award in June 2007 (prize of $5,000).

 

This year, the Sustainability Office initiated the first external SEEDS project. The project involves a student and a professor from the School of Community and Regional Planning in research supporting the Strathcona Business Improvement Society and its vision to create a Green Zone in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. We hope to have a greater number of SEEDS off-campus projects in the future.

 

Participants in SEEDS:

2004-2005 – 364 SEED participants, 44 papers

2005-2006 – 344 SEED participants, 50 papers

2006-2007 – 398 SEED participants, 64 papers

2007-2008 – 500 SEED participants, 69 papers

2000–2008 - over 2800 participants, 500 SEEDS projects

 

Seeds at UBC–O

The SEEDS program now operates on the UBC Okanagan campus. A student composting research project, combined with the goal of reducing organic waste from UBC-O’s food services operations, resulted in the acquisition of composing equipment and new composting practices to help meet this goal. UBC Okanagan provided funding for two Earth Tubs - compact composting systems that recycle organic waste materials at the site where it’s generated.  While this project demonstrated UBC Okanagan’s commitment to student involvement in sustainability, it also assisted Aramark in its quest to become the most sustainable campus cafeteria in Canada. The high-grade compost produced by the Earth Tubs will be used in flower beds and gardens situated on campus.

 

A student project is currently underway to inventory UBC Okanagan’s GHG emissions, which will contribute important data toward UBC Okanagan’s emission baselines and toward the development of appropriate CO 2 reduction strategies.

 
55) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or other similar programs to promote behavioral change on campus?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please provide details below, and indicate URL if available: http://www.sustain.ubc.ca/ressc.html
[ 2 ]  Paid positions through the UBC Sustainability Office. Average hours worked weekly per student intern: 6 hours per week from September – April.

[#  ]  Positions that award academic credit. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[8 ] Uncompensated positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 4 hours

Residence Sustainability Coordinators

The UBC Residence Sustainability Coordinators (Res SCs) are students living in residence at UBC-V who work with other energetic volunteers to lead, inspire, network, learn and create change in their residences and on campus. The Res SC program involves approximately 80 students with an email listserv of 113. It reaches approximately 2900 more students through its programs. The Res SCs have a strong partnership with Sprouts and Waste Management that focus on organic food and composting. In addition, their work contributes savings in energy, waste, and water consumption and provides students with important learning, networking and leadership experiences. The program began in the two junior residences, Totem Park and Place Vanier, and has expanded to four senior residences; Fairview, Gage, Acadia and Marine Drive.

 

2007-2008 - Residence Sustainability Coordinators – 5 Resident Advisors with outreach to 2900 students.


STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
56) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?

[  ]  No
[X ] Yes. Please provide total number of active organizations, names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs, if available:

AMS Sustainability

The AMS recognizes the ecological crisis humanity faces and the special responsibility universities, and university students, have in finding and implementing solutions. We acknowledge our obligations as global citizens and strive to create a sustainable and equitable future for all.

http://www.amsubc.ca/index.php/student_government/subpage/category/resources_and_links

Sustainability Working Group, Institute of Mining Engineering

Environmental and social issues have become increasingly important in the mining industry, a fact recognized by the Faculty and students in Mining Engineering. The Sustainability Working Group (SWG) uses a cooperative team leadership approach. Graduate student members of the group are from a variety of disciplinary and experiential backgrounds.

http://www.mining.ubc.ca/SWG.html

 

Net Impact, Sauder Chapter

Net Impact is a worldwide network of MBAs, graduate students, and professionals who are committed to using business for a positive social, environmental, and economic impact. The Net Impact chapter at Sauder currently has are dedicated to the pursuit of sustainability education outside of the MBA classroom with approximately 30 members. Joe English & Alexandre Hebert authored a paper entitled "The MBA Curriculum: A Review of its sustainability content" in 2008 for Sauder.

http://www.netimpact.org/

 

 

Common Energy, UBC Chapter

Common Energy is a student group working towards bringing UBC beyond carbon-neutral. They are currently working with the Campus Climate Network on the GoBeyond Project, a BC-wide initiative to take institutions of higher education beyond climate neutral.

http://www.campusclimatenetwork.org/wiki/Welcome

 

Student Environment Centre (SEC)

SEC is a resource group mandated by the Alma Mater Society for people within the UBC Community who are concerned, or would like to learn more about environmental problems and the broader issues of sustainability facing our planet. Volunteers provide environmental and sustainability resources to the UBC community and organize a number of events and projects like Buy Nothing Day and the UBC Sustainability Conference

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/student_life/resource_groups/sec/

 

Chemical and Biological Engineering (CHBE) Sustainability Club

Have you ever asked yourself what Sustainability is all about? What do we mean by a balance between Social, Economical and Environmental priorities? Do you understand that North American people live as if 4.6 planets Earth were available to support our lifestyle? Our Club was initiated by people just like you who pondered about these things. We are also seeking for answers and solutions to implement in our department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (CHBE) at the University of British Columbia

http://www.chml.ubc.ca/sustainability/index.html

 

CUS Sustainability, UBC Commerce

Created by commerce students at UBC, Chasing Sustainability coordinates a speaker series that increases students' knowledge and curiosity of sustainable business practices

http://sustainability.cusonline.ca/

 

Environmental Science Students Association (ESSA)

A student club representing the environmental sciences program at UBC

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/essa/about.php

 

Emerging Green Builders UBC

The UBC EGB will engage a robust interdisciplinary network of students, scholars, professors, practitioners, and administrators concerned with the future of the built environment.  We intend to provide students and new professionals affordable resources for integrating green design in their studies and practice.  Further, it is our mission to partake in advancing UBC and the Pacific Northwest as a global leader in sustainable design, development, and building

http://www.emerginggreenubc.ca/

 

Engineers without Borders UBC

Engineers Without Borders is dedicated to improving the livelihood of people in developing countries. We believe that people have great potential, and when provided with the opportunity, they are capable of bringing about tremendous change for themselves and their community. The UBC Chapter of Engineers Without Borders is just one of 27 (and counting) university chapters across the country.

http://ubc.ewb.ca/

 

Ancient Forest Committee (AFC)

Rallies and initiatives to conserve the forest

ubc.afc@gmail.com

 

Sprouts

A student-run volunteer organization at UBC that endeavors to make accessible the healthiest, most affordable, and most sustainably produced food on campus through a cafe, a grocery store, a bulk buying club, and a catering business

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/nfc/

 

Oxfam UBC

International advocacy, aid, and sustainable development organization

  http://salink.ams.ubc.ca/Community?action=getOrgHome&orgID=2624

 

The goBeyond project

Implemented by a network of student leaders from post-secondary schools across BC that seeks to educate, inspire, engage and support students in implementing climate action on their campuses

  http://www.go-beyond.ca

 

UBC Food Society Club

A community of hungry people who want to discover and adventure food at UBC and in Vancouver. They come together at least once a month to eat well, learn to cook, and learn other wonderful ways food impacts our lives

http://www.ubcfoodsociety.com/

 

Social Justice Centre

A resource group of the AMS set out to abolish socio-economic inequalities that exist both globally and in our communities

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/student_life/resource_groups/social_justice/index.html

 

Global Outreach Students' Association

An interdisciplinary group that provides students with opportunities to learn about health and development issues. GOSA primarily focuses on raising awareness about the complex issues surrounding health in less developed countries. They provide students the opportunity to gain practical experience working within disadvantaged communities locally and internationally.

http://www.health-disciplines.ubc.ca/GOSA/GOSA_index.htm

 

Friends of the Farm

A group of people to promote the UBC Farm and organize outreach events. The Friends of the Farm (FoF) is available to both students (as an AMS group) and the wider community.

http://www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/friendsubcfarm/Site/Home.html

 

Agents of Change

The UBC chapter of a registered non-profit dedicated to youth engagement and sustainable solutions to global poverty.

Aside from putting on regular awareness and fundraising events, our Agents organize innovative and sustainable projects such as Inter-university Microcredit Challenge. These projects are creating awareness among young people, engaging them in the fight against global poverty and growing a powerful microcredit fund entirely managed by the youth.

 

Green Party of UBC

The Green Party UBC Club strives to promote environmental awareness, governmental accountability, and sustainable economic prosperity. This club holds screening of documentaries related to Green issues, weekly meetings to discuss club business and topics of interest, parties, and other events featuring speakers such as Elizabeth May, leader of the Federal Green Party, and Adriane Carr, leader of the BC Green Party.

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=2201408273

 

Students Taking Initiative

Students Taking Initiative (S.T.I. UBC) is comprised of a group of students dedicated to taking the initiative to give back to the community. The club focuses both on humanitarian work (raising funds, donating time and helping various charitable organizations) and fostering leadership at all levels.

http://www.stiubc.com/aboutus.html

 


SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS
57) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please list details for all competitions.
Name of competition: GoBEYOND challenge
Year initiated: 2008
Frequency of competition: on-going
Participants: approximately 2000 on 12 campuses across British Columbia

Incentives: peer-to-peer marketing via carbon calculator face-book application, ‘swag’ (buttons, water bottles etc.)
Goal of competition: educate, engage, inspire and support students to make carbon-smart lifestyle choices individually, and within their communities.
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: not quantified

Lasting effects of competition: engagement within the broader scope of the goBEYOND project, which trains students to reduce their carbon footprint and support their community in doing the same.
Website: http://www.go-beyond.ca

 

GoBEYOND

The UBC Sustainability Office is one of three partners in the goBEYOND project, a B.C. student network that educates and builds capacity for students across the province to move themselves and their communities beyond climate-neutral. The program was piloted at UBC, University of Victoria and Thomson Rivers University and has expanded to 9 other B.C. institutions in 2009. Funded by the B.C. government, BC Hydro and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions for more than $150,000, the youth-led program engages students to make carbon-smart lifestyle choices through lectures, workshops and presentations, and challenges students to take climate action. To date, the project has reached more than 84,000 youth across the province through its programming. The fall and spring teach-in engaged more than 20,000 students, 400 professors and 21 institutions in a province-wide in-class discussion on climate action. At UBC’s Vancouver and Okanagan campuses, more than 17,000 students have been made aware of, or participated in, the project.

 

North American Youth Leadership Project (NAYLP)

With BC Hydro’s generous support of $20,000, nine high school students and three UBC Student/Alumni mentors attended the North American Youth Leadership Conference on Sustainability in San Francisco, California in January 2008. The NAYLP is a collaborative partnership among UBC, the California Centre for Civic Engagement and five other host institutions across the west coast of Canada, the United States and Mexico to support student-led education and action. The conference targeted youth, the public at large and adult decision-makers.

 

Led by UBC TREKStep student Janine Pham, the attendees joined youth from California and Mexico to learn the skills and tools necessary to initiate and manage their own sustainability and energy conservation projects. Upon return, the students began projects in four high schools in the Vancouver region, and established a Green Team.  The youth leaders involved in the Green Team hope to cultivate strong student and staff support to encourage environmental practice through daily actions.

 

Net Impact ( http://www.mbasociety.ca/NetImpact )

The MBA Net Impact Chapter mission is to make a positive impact on society by growing and strengthening a community of new leaders who use business to improve the world. This is achieved by bring together like minded individuals in lively discussions around sustainability, development of curriculum, planning and hosting the Sustainable Career Fair, and promoting opportunities in Vancouver, and around the world related to sustainability.

AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy ( http://www2.ams.ubc.ca/index.php/student_government/subpage/category/ams_lighter_footprint_strategy/ )

The AMS Council passed an Environmental Sustainability Policy in January 2007 that called for the creation of the AMS Lighter Footprint Strategy. We want to be a leader in reducing the University campus’ ecological footprint to sustainable levels by fostering environmental justice in our own operations and lobbying for sustainable practices through our relationships with the University community and broader society.  Strategy targets include:

  • Food and Beverages (Internal)
  • Materials (Internal)
  • Communications (Internal)
  • Building Materials (Interactive)
  • Building Energy (Interactive)
  • Transportation (Interactive)
  • Campus Development & Policies (Interactive)
  • Curriculum & Learning Spaces (Interactive)


TRANSPORTATION

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET
58) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?

[334]

59) Please list the number of alternative-fuel vehicles in each class.
[3 ] Hybrid. Please list makes and models: Toyota Prius and Camry. Freightliner M2 106.
[14 ] Electric. Please describe type of vehicles: Utility trucks
[60 ] Biodiesel. Please describe type of vehicles and list biodiesel blend(s) used: garden maintenance equipment up to Class 8 trucks. 20% biodiesel.
[7 ] Other. Please describe: propane forklifts

Fleet Management

UBC Plant Operations Fleet Management unit at UBC-V manages over two-thirds of the University’s fleet of vehicles. The remainder of campus-owned vehicles are managed and operated by university departments or faculties.

 

Recent sustainability successes include:

  • Use of bio diesel in all diesel-run vehicles
    • 20 per cent mix in the summer
    • 10 per cent mix in the winter
  • Purchase of Electric Vehicles
  • Replacement of larger diesel-powered vehicles with hybrid-diesel units, which are ideally suited for on-campus use. UBC was awarded $40,000 from the Fraser Basin Council to help offset the costs of acquiring the first two hybrid-diesel trucks.

 

In the spring of 2008, Food Services purchased two lightweight electric delivery trucks to support their fleet of five traditional gas vehicles at UBC-V. This investment promises strong returns, through cost savings for maintenance and fuel, significant GHG reductions, and positive marketing and public relations gains. A future goal is to convert the entire Food Services fleet to use more sustainable energy sources.


60) What is the average GHG emission rate per passenger mile of your institution's motorized fleet?
[#  0.13]  pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger mile traveled.

The total number of passenger miles traveled by vehicles in the institution’s fleet

1165125 m

 The greenhouse gas emissions from institution’s fleet in pounds of CO2e

154084 LBS

Greenhouse gas emissions per passenger mile traveled

0.13 lbs of CO2e per passenger mile traveled

 A brief description of institution’s methodology for gathering data and calculating emissions

We totaled up the number of vehicles in our fleet and averaged the kilometers traveled by each one and multiplied the average number of passengers each vehicle carried.(We have 42 pieces of equipment which measure usage in terms of hours. Theses pieces average 500 hrs of usage per year and would consume an average of 4 L/hr.)

(2007-2008)

The UBC Plant Operations Fleet Management unit refueled about 260 of 334 pieces on site. In the 12 months ending June 11/09, Plant Operations dispensed 110,550 litres of 20% biodiesel and 319,000 litres of gasoline. The average vehicle travelled 6,000 - 8,000 km per year with 2 passengers per unit.
--------------------------------------------------------------

Update 8/6/09 


Gasoline - [0.46 kg] of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger km traveled.

B20 diesel - [0.53 kg] of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger km traveled.

 

Building operations maintains 131 on-road vehicles.

 

233,350 litres of gasoline dispensed = 709,000 kg CO2e. Building operations averaged 1,540,000 passenger kilometers per year. (110 units x 7000 km/year x 2 people per unit). For gasoline, building operations averaged 0.46 kg of CO2e per passenger km.

 

77,610 litres of B20 diesel dispensed for on-road units = 223,390 kg of CO2e. Building operations averaged 420,000 passenger km per year (21 units x 20,000 km/yr x 1 passenger).

 

A telematic system that tracks how much fuel each vehicle consumes is planned to be installed within fleet service on-road vehicles by the end of the 2009. Information for kg of CO2e per passenger km for the total fleet of vehicles at UBC is not currently available.

--------------------------------------------------------------

 

LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES
61) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe details of the program including the type of the incentive and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

Free online ride matching services through web-based booking system, which is eligible for all members of the UBC community including students, staff, faculty, alumni, residents, and visitors.


62) Does your school offer public transportation subsidies?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please describe the program including the size of the discount (as a percent of full price) and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, and students):

UBC and the AMS have a joint agreement with TransLink to provide the U-Pass to students, which is a mandatory unlimited access pass to all transit services in the region.  The pass costs $26.75 per month, $3.00 per student per month that is subsidized by the University.  This is a 80% discount off the regular three-zone monthly bus pass.

 

UBC also participates in the TransLink Employer Pass Program, where employees can get monthly passes with a 15% discount.  UBC administers the program with a half-time staff member, but provides no direct subsidies to the program.


63) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe:

There are three community shuttles which run every 30 minutes throughout campus. They are part of the regional transit service network, where regular transit fares are applied. Students may access this service, along with all other regional transit service, with their U-Pass


64) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe:


BICYCLE PROGRAM
65) Does your school offer a bicycle-sharing/rental program or bicycle repair services?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please provide details below.

Year created: 1998
Number of bikes available: over 200
Fees for participation: must be a member of the AMS bike co-op
Repair services provided: see below

A student-run organization manages a bike share program, a rental program, and a full-service bike shop. (See AMS Bike Co-op, http://www.ams.ubc.ca/clubs/bikecoop/ )

 

To become a member of the bike co-op, you must volunteer at the co-op for 6 hours, OR, you can pay $15 for students/ $20 for faculty, staff, and community members. With membership, and one night of volunteering at a Tuesday Purple & Yellow party from 6-9pm, you can get access to over 75 public bikes.

 

UBC is also currently exploring the feasibility of a large scale public bike system for the campus.  Stay tuned for more details at www.trek.ubc.ca.

 
CAR-SHARING PROGRAM
66) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?

[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Year created:
Total number of vehicles:
Number of hybrid vehicles:
Fee for membership:

UBC is partnered with two car-sharing programs. 

1) Zipcar

   5 cars on campus (none hybrid)

   $30 per year

   $10 per hour

2) Cooperative Auto Network (CAN)

   6 cars on campus (none hybrid)

   $500 membership

   $0.35 per kilometer + 2.50 per hour

   (see Zipcar, www.zipcar.com/ubc; Cooperative Auto Network, www.cooperativeauto.net)

PLANNING
67) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?

[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe:

Many of the roads in core campus are closed to emergency vehicles only. We also have a capital investment program for end-of-trip facilities for cyclists (bike racks, secure bike cages, etc). (Source: 2008 Transportation Status Report)


68) What percentage of individuals commute to campus via environmentally preferable transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling, carpooling, using public transit)?
[62 %]

 

Daily Person trips

% of Mode share

Sov

43100

37

HOV

17900

15

Transit

51000

44

Bike

1600

1

Ped

1000

>1

Truck and motorcycle

1600

1

Total

116,200

100

 

(Source: 2008 Transportation Status Report)

 

The overall goal is to maintain annual average auto traffic at or below 1997 per capita levels for UBC-Vancouver. Auto traffic trends:

2005-2006 – 24% reduction

2006-2007 – 22% reduction

2007-2008 – 20% reduction


STATISTICS

69) Campus setting:

[  ]  Rural
[  ]  Suburban
[]  Urban
[X ]  Other. Please describe: University endowed land within Metro Vancouver

70)  Total number of buildings: [415 core and auxiliary]
71)  Combined gross square footage of all buildings: [13,258,313 sq ft]

72)  Full-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [30,560] (2007-08)
73)  Part-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [13,601] (2007-08)
74)  Part-time enrollment as a proportion to a full-time course load: [44.5%]
75)  Percent of full-time students that live on campus : [28.7% of enrolled students]

Questions 76-87 are for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Please mark an "X" next to each item that applies to your institution.

76)  Outdoors club: [X ]
77)  Disposable water bottle ban: [  ]
78)  Participation in Recyclemania : [  American program]
79)  Student trustee position : [  ]
80)  Environmental science/studies major : [X ]
81)  Environmental science/studies minor or concentration: [X ]
82)  Graduate-level environmental program: [X ]
83)  Student green fee: [X ]
84)  Alumni green fund: [  ]
85)  Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects: [X ]
86)  Campus garden or farm: [X]
87)  Single-stream recycling: [  ]

 

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