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Report Card 2010

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Carnegie Mellon University

Student Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name: Aya Chaoka
Position (in student organization): Eco-Reps Coordinator

Date survey submitted: July 16, 2009

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

1) Please describe the student-run campus environmental/sustainability organization in which you have a leadership role.

Name of organization: Eco-Reps

Number of active members: 26

Website: www.cmu.edu/eco-reps

Date of last meeting: May 3, 2009

Frequency of meetings: twice a month

Key issues addressed and programs implemented since August 2008: conserving water/energy, recycling, various activities to teach dormitory residents about sustainable living

Progress made on each issue/program since August 2008: more students are aware of what they can do to live environmentally on campus, what impact their actions have on the environment

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

2) Does your group organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

[ ] No

[ x ] Yes. Please list details for each competition.

#1 - Name of competition: Recyclemania

Year initiated: 2005

Frequency of competition: annual

Participants: whole campus

Incentives: recognition

Goal of competition: increase recyling

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: unknown

Lasting effects of competition: more dorm residents are aware of how much more recycling they can do for the campus

Website:

 

#2 - Name of competition:

Year initiated:

Frequency of competition:

Participants:

Incentives:

Goal of competition:

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced:

Lasting effects of competition:

Website:

 

SUSTAINABILITY IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT

3) Does your student government include a specific position or committee dedicated to campus sustainability issues?

[ x] No

[ ] Yes. Please describe:

 

OTHER ACTIVITIES

4) Please describe any additional campus sustainability activities or projects that you or your group has initiated at your school: Housing & Dining Services invest a lot of money into creating an environmentally friendly environment for students. For example, all dining utensils were switched to biodegradable utensils last year, some to silverware, paper plates replaced some plastic plates. Newer dorms were built to be LEED certified, and recently a new café received gold LEED certification. In fact, our organization is student-run, but completely funded by Housing & Dining. In academic buildings, all printers default to double-sided printing.

 

5) Please list and briefly describe any other student-run organizations related to campus sustainability at your school, and provide URLs if available (e.g., student groups; student government committees; student-run food co-ops, gardens/farms, bike co-ops) and provide contact information of the student leaders, if possible:

Sustainable Earth: http://andrew.cmu.edu/user/sustain/home.html

Environmental Policy Group: http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/current-students/studentlife/student-organizations/environmental-policy-group/index.aspx

Student Pugwash: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/pugwash/

Engineers Without Borders: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/ewb/index.html

 

Questions 6 is for informational purposes only; your response will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

6) Please list any regional or national networks with which your group is affiliated (e.g., Energy Action Coalition/Campus Climate Challenge, Sierra Student Coalition, a state PIRG, a state student sustainability coalition):

 

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Name: Justin Parisi

Position (in student organization): VP of Sustainable Initiatives

Date survey submitted: July 20, 2009

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

1) Please describe the student-run campus environmental/sustainability rganization in which you have a leadership role.

Name of organization: Net Impact

Number of active members: 120

Website: http://sites.google.com/site/cmunetimpact/

Date of last meeting:

General Body: late March 2009

Exec Board: late June 2009 via conference call

Frequency of meetings: monthly during school calendar year

Key issues addressed and programs implemented since August 2008:

1. Material waste reduction

2. Energy use reduction

3. Food waste reduction

4. Building occupant awareness campaign

5. Make a presence on campus at the university level

6. Run small events to help people think a bit more about sustainability

Progress made on each issue/program since August 2008:

1. Printers were already set standard for double-sided printing so we needed to move to less tangible things. We ordered new recycling stations since we

noticed that recycling and waste became commingled when stand-alone recycling bins became separated from stand-alone trash bins. The recycling

stations do not let the bins float away from one another and therefore offer every waste segregation option whenever a student reaches a station. The

stations will be installed in early August.

2. Some occupancy sensors already were in place, so again we had to look for higher-hanging fruit. “Please turn off the lights” stickers were installed on all

switch plate covers. The computer laboratory now shuts down completely at 2 a.m. and doesn’t restart until individual machines are turned on one at a time

by users the next morning. We are currently reviewing the light on/off schedule to see if many lights can be turned off during the day and even a few

extra lights can be turned off at night.

3. Partnered with a healthy food catering service to provide 99% compostable lunches. The caterer simply does not provide items that cannot be composted

and a team of Net Impact members accept all waste, as a single commingled stream, from the everyone when lunch is over. The Net Impact members

separate all waste into recyclable waste, compostable waste, and landfill waste. The most successful event was recently run for 400 people and generated landfill waste that fit into a 12-inch cube. Net Impact is also planning to offer their services to others who want to have a compostable lunch for their group but are not sure how to go about it.

4. For our members, we have a weekly newsletter that includes announcements as well as a “Greening Article of the Week.” For all students, we publish a

“Greening Tip of the Week” in the weekly student magazine. The light switch stickers are helpful in making people think about their actions with regards to

energy use and they have been successful in helping motivate people to turn off lights when not in use. Net Impact also hosts a speaker series: a series of

lectures from professionals across the country who have lessons to share on sustainability and corporate social responsibility.

5. Carnegie Mellon University is a leader in sustainability but every leader needs help in getting the message out. Net Impact has strong ties to two of the seven colleges at the university: the business school and the school of public policy. By attending meetings with the University’s Green Practices Committee and by having cross-club membership with other sustainability-oriented groups on campus, we have been able to stay abreast of the campus initiatives and keep a pulse on what messages our campus leaders wish to disperse into the far corners of the student, staff, and faculty bodies. We have partnered with other groups in hosting and organizing a number of events on campus. We are also forming a “Green Team” in August 2009 (one of many that will be formed on campus) to help engage students, staff, and faculty in thinking and acting sustainably in the physical areas that they occupy the most when on campus.

6. We’ve had two field trips. One trip was to an automated recycling plant that services four of the surrounding U.S. states. The second trip was on our own

campus to see the partially-completed construction of a LEED-Gold building. For fun and to raise awareness, we also organized a 5k on Earth Day in 2009.

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

2) Does your group organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your c ampus and/or with other colleges?

[ ] No

[ X] Yes. Please list details for each competition.

#1 - Name of competition: KIVA Lending Challenge

Year initiated: 2009

Frequency of competition: continuous

Participants: 43

Incentives: we set a total dollar goal to incent individuals to contribute towards that total

Goal of competition: raise lending money (the money is returned, hence it is “lending”) for entrepreneurs in developing countries

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: Uknown, as it is dependant on the project(s) of successful entrepreneurial effort

Lasting effects of competition: entrepreneurs have access to much needed loan funding

Website: http://www.kiva.org/community/viewTeam?team_id=5679

#2 - Name of competition: Net Impact Case Competition

Year initiated: expected August 2009

Frequency of competition: once per year

Participants: expected 50

Incentives: cash prize

Goal of competition: solve a business case for a real business in real time

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: Uknown, as it is dependant on the project(s) of business for which consulting is done.

Lasting effects of competition: local business receives powerful consulting support for the negligible cost of a cash prize

Website: N/A

 

SUSTAINABILITY IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT

3) Does your student government include a specific position or committee dedicated to campus sustainability issues?

[X] No

[ ] Yes. Please describe:

 

OTHER ACTIVITIES

4) Please describe any additional campus sustainability activities or projects that you or your group has initiated at your school: They have all been described above.

 

5) Please list and briefly describe any other student-run organizations related to campus sustainability at your school, and provide URLs if available (e.g., student groups; student government committees; student-run food co-ops, gardens/farms, bike co-ops) and provide contact information of the student leaders, if possible: Sustainable Earth: (new website coming) http://andrew.cmu.edu/user/sustain/home.html

Eco-Reps: http://www.cmu.edu/eco-reps/

Environmental Policy Group: http://www.heinz.cmu.edu/current-students/studentlife/student-organizations/environmental-policy-group/index.aspx

Student Pugwash: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/pugwash/

Engineers Without Borders: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/ewb/index.html

[NOT student-run: Green Practices Committee: http://www.cmu.edu/greenpractices/ ]

 

Questions 6 is for informational purposes only; your response will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

6) Please list any regional or national networks with which your group is affiliated (e.g., Energy Action Coalition/Campus Climate Challenge, Sierra Student Coalition, a state PIRG, a state student sustainability coalition): Net Impact is a national organization: www.netimpact.org

 

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Name: Daisy Wang; Vanessa Schweizer

Position (in student organization): President; Focus the Nation 2009 Coordinator

Date survey submitted: July 21, 2009

 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS

1) Please describe the student-run campus environmental/sustainability organization in which you have a leadership role.

Name of organization: Sustainable Earth

Number of active members: 20

Website: Work in progress

Date of last meeting: April 30, 2009

Frequency of meetings: Weekly during the academic year

Key issues addressed and programs implemented since August 2008: Awareness-raising

programs and initiatives ("Recipes for Sustainability" pocketbooks, University Center

Friday, University Center Late Night, Earth Week events); three-day symposium on

climate change (Focus the Nation Teach-In); leadership development and civic

engagement on climate change in Washington, DC (Powershift)

Progress made on each issue/program since August 2008: First edition of "Recipes for

Sustainability" printed and distributed; successful execution of University Center Friday,

University Center Late Night, and Earth Week events; successful execution of 2nd annual

Focus the Nation (600 participants); successful participation in 2nd annual Powershift

(50 students from Carnegie Mellon ).

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS

2) Does your group organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?

[ ] No

[ X ] Yes. Please list details for each competition.

#1 - Name of competition: Recylemania

Year initiated: 2004

Frequency of competition: Annual

Participants: Campus-wide

Incentives: During the first week of Recyclemania, students can win free prizes such as water bottles, stickers, and cookies for pledging to recycle as much as they can over the next 10 weeks.

Goal of competition: To increase the campus recycling rate and recycling awareness.

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: 15.63% of waste recycled. Cumulative waste lbs/person: 80.17 (high in participating Pennsylvania schools 104.39; low was 14.16). Cumulative recyclable lbs/person: 12.53 (low in participating Pennsylvania schools was 1.46; high was 34.99).

Lasting effects of competition: Increased awareness of benefits of recycling throughout the campus community

Website: http://www.cmu.edu/greenpractices/campus-recycling/events.html

#2 - Name of competition: America’s Greenest Campus

Year initiated: 2008

Frequency of competition: One-time event

Participants: 142

Incentives: $5,000 for school with most participants, $5,000 for school with most carbon

reductions, $10,000 for an advertisement challenge.

Goal of competition: To engage the most students to reduce their carbon footprints and/or to recognize campuses that declare the most carbon reductions.

Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: 2.35% carbon reduction

Lasting effects of competition: Promoted sustainable practices in everyday life. Introduced new ways to live “green” that normally might not come to mind. Sets up a network of sustainable thinking youth.

Website: www.climateculture.com

 

SUSTAINABILITY IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT

3) Does your student government include a specific position or committee dedicated to campus sustainability issues?

[ X ] No. However it should be noted that there is a university committee consisting of faculty, staff, and students dedicated to campus sustainability issues - the Green Practices Committee (GPC) ( http://www.cmu.edu/greenpractices/green-practicescommittee/green-practices-committee.html ). Sustainable Earth regularly has a student representative at monthly GPC meetings.

[ ] Yes. Please describe:

 

OTHER ACTIVITIES

4) Please describe any additional campus sustainability activities or projects that you or your group has initiated at your school:

(a) Volunteer days at Braddock Farm (local urban farming) and at Schenley Park (removing invasive species)

(b) Campaign to increase Carnegie Mellon's purchase of electricity generated by renewable sources (to 61%). This campaign successfully initiated a more in-depth investigation of the campus carbon footprint through the Engineering and Public Policy/Social and Decision Sciences/Heinz College project course (19-451/88-222/90- 720) during the spring 2008 semester. The project course report, "It's Not Easy Being Green," can be found at

http://www.cmu.edu/steinbrenner/Reports%20and%20Presentations/index.html .

 

5) Please list and briefly describe any other student-run organizations related to campus sustainability at your school, and provide URLs if available (e.g., student groups; student government committees; student-run food co-ops, gardens/farms, bike co-ops) and provide contact information of the student leaders, if possible:

LiveGreen: Environmental student group based at the Carnegie Mellon Qatar campus in Doha, Qatar. Sustainable Earth and LiveGreen members engaged in a reading and discussion group focused on Thomas Friedman's Hot, Flat, and Crowded as well as campus recycling initiatives this academic year by videoconference.

 

Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE): Non-profit organization educating people on concepts like market economics, entrepreneurship, and business ethics through educational outreach projects. SIFE at Carnegie Mellon University works on sustainable projects in particular such as Eco-Market, an initiative to teach young students the environmental responsibility of businesses.

 

Neville Co-op: The Co-op is a small housing community (22 students) founded on the values of democracy; sustainability; and equality of race, gender, and sexual orientation. Members hold weekly democratic meetings to run the Co-op, recycle, compost, and improve the living community. http://nevillecoop.org

 

Tepper Energy Club: A student-run professional organization dedicated to developing and broadening the Tepper (Carnegie Mellon school of business) community's interest in the energy industry. The TEC provides both learning and networking opportunities through a variety of forums emphasizing the preparation for the diversity of careers available in the energy sector. http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/current-students/currentgraduate-students/student-clubs/energy-club/index.aspx .

 

Student groups listed below are also featured at the following web page:

http://www.cmu.edu/greenpractices/student-resources/

Eco-Reps: Students from different housing areas who educate peers in their house community on how to live in a more environmentally friendly way.

http://www.cmu.edu/eco-reps/ .

 

Net Impact, Carnegie Mellon chapter: A network of emerging business leaders committed to using the power of business to create a better world. Green practices are one of Net Impact's areas of focus. http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/current-students/currentgraduate-

students/student-clubs/net-impact/index.aspx. 

 

Engineers Without Borders, Carnegie Mellon chapter: Students work with developing communities throughout the world to improve the quality of life for individuals through the development of environmentally and economically sustainable engineering projects.

 

Pugwash, Carnegie Mellon chapter: A non-advocacy, educational organization. The Carnegie Mellon Student Pugwash (CMSP) intends to increase student and faculty awareness of the ethical dilemmas created by the interaction of science, technology, medicine, and the arts within contemporary society. By organizing activities to generate insight into the responsible management of science, technology, and the arts, CMSP stimulates informed judgment on the critical issues of our time, and, in so doing, bridges the gap between academia and activism. http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/pugwash/.

 

Heinz Environmental Group: An open forum for discussion on various environmental issues of the day, strategizing about the future curriculum of environmental courses at the Heinz College (Carnegie Mellon's graduate school of public policy and management), and providing a venue to take part in environmental projects to strengthen the Heinz College community with that of Carnegie Mellon University.

 

Questions 6 is for informational purposes only; your response will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

 

6) Please list any regional or national networks with which your group is affiliated (e.g., Energy Action Coalition/Campus Climate Challenge, Sierra Student Coalition, a state PIRG, a state student sustainability coalition): Though we are not affiliated with outside groups, we often collaborate with outside groups to share talent and staff community events. In the past, we have worked with the Sierra Student Coalition and with the University of Pittsburgh environmental group Free the Planet. Campus coordinators of national initiatives, such as Focus the Nation, the National Teach-In on Global Warming Solutions, and Powershift, have also maintained ties with regional organizers.

 

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Name: Sarah Strano
Position (in student organization): Finance Committee Co-chair
Date survey submitted: July 20, 2009

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
1) Please describe the student-run campus environmental/sustainability organization in which you have a leadership role.
Name of organization: Engineers Without Borders, Carnegie Mellon University Chapter (EWB-CMU)

Number of active members: 15

Website: http://www.andrew.cmu.edu/org/ewb/

Date of last meeting: April 15, 2009
Frequency of meetings: Bi-monthly executive board meetings, bi-monthly general body meetings, and monthly Pittsburgh area tri-chapter meetings (with EWB Pittsburgh Professional Chapter and EWB University of Pittsburgh Chapter), project meetings as necessary
Key issues addressed and programs implemented since August 2008:

  • Chapter formation and recognition
  • Project initiation
  • Campus presence building

Progress made on each issue/program since August 2008:

  • Formed campus EWB chapter and became a Carnegie Mellon recognized organization; Became a nationally recognized EWB chapter
  • Initiated research projects including “Feasibility of Small-scale Jatropha Bio-fuel production in Eastern Africa” and “Water Supply and Purification in Ecuador.”
  • Built a bicycle-powered blender and gave out smoothies on Carnegie Mellon’s campus to build presence


SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS
2) Does your group organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please list details for each competition.
#1 - Name of competition: Carnegie Mellon Spring Carnival, Green Booths Award

Year initiated: This program was not initiated by EWB-CMU, but members helped to organize the effort and judge the competition in 2009.
Frequency of competition: Annual
Participants: All participants in Carnegie Mellon’s Spring Carnival Booth competition, an annual event in which organizations build themed wooden booths on display during the university-sponsored carnival, also compete in the “Green Booths” portion of the booth competition; 31 organizations competed in 2009
Incentives: $500 prize
Goal of competition: To ensure green practices during Carnegie Mellon’s Spring Carnival by reducing waste, energy consumption, and chemical exposure.  Groups were judged on a variety of criteria, including reusing/recycling materials, using environmentally-friendly paints and adhesives, and using energy-efficient lighting.
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced:
Lasting effects of competition: Embedding the concept of sustainability and practical applications of green practices into all aspects of Carnegie Mellon student life.
Website: http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~sc0v/booth.html

SUSTAINABILITY IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT
3) Does your student government include a specific position or committee dedicated to campus sustainability issues?
[X]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe:

OTHER ACTIVITIES
4) Please describe any additional campus sustainability activities or projects that you or your group has initiated at your school:  

  • Built a bicycle-powered blender to raise awareness about EWB-CMU and promote alternative energy and creative engineering on Carnegie Mellon’s campus.

 

5) Please list and briefly describe any other student-run organizations related to campus sustainability at your school, and provide URLs if available (e.g., student groups; student government committees; student-run food co-ops, gardens/farms, bike co-ops) and provide contact information of the student leaders, if possible:  

  • Sustainable Earth: Sustainable Earth is a student-led environmental awareness and education group.  Annual projects include sending Carnegie Mellon students to Powershift, presenting a Focus the Nation event, organizing Earth Day festivities, and organizing environmentally-themed volunteer activities. President, Daisy Wang ( daisyw@andrew.cmu.edu ).
  • Eco-Reps: Eco-reps is a peer-to-peer sustainability education organization.  The Eco-reps live in campus housing and run monthly action items in their residence, with themes ranging from water conservation to recycling. http://www.cmu.edu/eco-reps/
  • Green Team: The Green Team is developing a green communications directed toward educating Carnegie Mellon students, faculty, and staff about green practices on campus.  The Green Team has representatives in various departments, who work on improving green practices within the department.  Co-founder, Rachel Inman ( rinman@andrew.cmu.edu ); Co-founder, Nancy Lao ( nancy@cmu.edu ).
  • Net Impact: The Net Impact chapter at the Tepper School of Business has a mission to promote the education and understanding of business ethics and corporate social responsibility among MBA students and other interested graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University. http://www.tepper.cmu.edu/current-students/current-graduate-students/student-clubs/net-impact/index.aspx .  Justin Parisi ( jparisi@andrew.cmu.edu ).

 

Questions 6 is for informational purposes only; your response will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

6) Please list any regional or national networks with which your group is affiliated (e.g., Energy Action Coalition/Campus Climate Challenge, Sierra Student Coalition, a state PIRG, a state student sustainability coalition):

  • Engineers Without Borders, USA (EWB-USA)
  • EWB Pittsburgh Professional Chapter
  • EWB University of Pittsburgh Chapter

 

 

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