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Report Card 2010

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Boston University

Campus Survey

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With the publication of the College Sustainability Report Card 2010, more than 1,100 school survey responses from over 300 institutions are now available online. In total, these surveys offer more than 10,000 pages of data collected from colleges and universities during the summer of 2009 . To access surveys from other schools, go to the  surveys section  of the website. To see grades, or to access additional surveys submitted by this school, please click the "Back to Report Card" link at the beginning or end of the survey.

 

Name: Dennis Carlberg, AIA, LEED AP
Title: Sustainability Director
Date survey submitted: July 23, 2009

ADMINISTRATION

SUSTAINABILITY POLICIES
1) Does your school have its own formal sustainability policy?
[  ] No
[X] Yes. Please describe and provide URL, if available:

http://www.bu.edu/president/strategic-plan/plan.shtml

Boston University’s strategic plan states that BU will work to be institutionally responsible as an environmental steward, in part by implementing sustainable infrastructural programs. The University’s Sustainability Committee is developing the sustainability policy further as part of its Sustainability Strategic Plan.

 

2) Has the president of your institution signed the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC)?
[X] No – BU is in the process of conducting a GHG inventory.
[  ]  Yes. If completed, please provide the date the GHG Report was submitted to the ACUPCC:

3) Has your institution signed the Talloires Declaration?
[X] No
[  ]  Yes

4) Is there a sustainability component in your institution's master plan and/or strategic plan (check all that apply)?
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes BU has integrated sustainability into its strategic plan    

http://www.bu.edu/president/strategic-plan/plan.shtml

 

The point of departure for Boston University’s journey into the future is the set of ten “commitments” that were recently embraced through the University’s 2005–2007 strategic planning process. They grow directly out of our traditions and our values. They reflect our strengths and weaknesses. And—in general and aspirational ways—they point to tomorrow’s opportunities. Three of the ten commitments address sustainability. Here are some excerpts

http://www.bu.edu/president/strategic-plan/point.shtml

 

6. A commitment to strengthening and expanding the University’s connections to Boston and the world.

 

… Just as we strive to give our students the context and experiences to function in our truly global society as responsible citizens, the University will continue to work to be institutionally responsible as a steward of our environment by putting in place programs of infrastructure renovation and usage that will conserve energy and minimize our emission of greenhouse gases. Much of this effort will be transparent as we renew our buildings.

 

8. A commitment to aligning our policies, processes, services, operations, and the development of our campus with our values.

 

Boston University is an incredibly complex institution. But complexity can’t be allowed to push our values to the background. We are, first and foremost, a service organization, and we have to act accordingly. We must deliver transparent and student-oriented processes across all of our campuses, schools, and colleges. We must control costs to protect the range and quality of our services, and at the same time ensure access to BU.

 

Even as our campus grows upward and outward, we will decrease our environmental “footprint.” We intend to focus on conserving energy and decreasing greenhouse-gas emissions in all of our operations.

 

Many universities just “happen.” The experience of this University is that things can be made to happen, in the right directions, when values point the way.

 

9. A commitment to aligning operating budgets, capital plans, and fundraising with the academic mission and the strategic plan.

 

We can and will be systematic and proactive when it comes to budgeting, planning, and seeking outside support. Our annual budgeting must reflect our overriding institutional priorities, while leaving room for new initiatives. Our capital planning also must reflect those priorities, and allow not only for the sustainable renewal of our existing campus, but also for the gradual implementation of our long-term campus master plan.

 

ADVISORY COUNCIL
5) Does your school have a council or committee that advises on and/or implements policies and programs related to sustainability?
[  ]  No
[X] Yes see below:

 

Background

During President Brown’s Matriculation Speech in 2008 President Brown announced the establishment of the Sustainability Committee to “reduce energy consumption and decrease waste across the campus by concentrating on four crucial areas: recycling and waste management, energy efficiency, sustainable building development and operations, and communications, education, and outreach.”

 

Sustainability Program
The purpose of the Boston University Sustainability Program is to promote strategic goals, best practices, and develop and implement policies and procedures to enhance sustainable campus development, operations, activities, education and research.

 

Organizational Structure

The Sustainability Committee is Boston University’s organization to address these issues and affect change on campus. The Sustainability Committee includes the Sustainability Steering Committee and four working groups including: Recycling and Waste Management, Energy Conservation, Sustainable Building and Facility Operations, and Communications and Outreach.

 

Sustainability Steering Committee

The Committee is charged with advising the University leadership on matters pertaining to the campus environment and sustainability. The mission of the Committee has three central goals:

•     Support the University’s core purpose of education, research, and scholarship, to achieve leadership in sustainability. Advance sustainable practices on campus through education, research, activities, development, and operations, to make sustainability integral to the fabric of Boston University;

•     Engage the campus in an ongoing dialogue about sustainability, and enhance communications across all segments of the community;

•     Instill a culture of sustainable long-term planning and forward-thinking

 

If you answered "No" to question 5, please proceed directly to question 11.

6) Please provide the name of the committee and list the number of meetings held since August 2008.

We have the following totals in the committee:

Admin: 13

Faculty: 12

Staff: 23

Students: 7 (our intent is to have one grad and one undergrad/working group, we still need to replace one student who graduated in May)

Total: 55

 

The co-chairs of each working group also serve on the Sustainability Steering Committee.

Staff is about double the other numbers because we want the doers (planners, projects, and operations) in the room when ideas are hatched. They know what needs to be done and how to get things done on campus.

 

[ 1 ] Meeting with Sustainability Steering Committee

[ 11 ] Meetings with Recycling and Waste Management

[ 12 ] Meetings with Energy Conservation

[ 10 ] Meetings with Sustainable Building and Facility Operations

[ 10 ] Meetings with Communications and Outreach


7) Please provide number of stakeholder representatives on the committee.

Sustainability Steering Committee

[#  9 ]  Administrators
[#  6 ]  Faculty
[#  3 ]  Staff
[#  0 ]  Students
[#     ]  Other, Please describe:


Recycling and Waste Management

[#  2 ]  Administrators
[#  1 ]  Faculty
[#  6 ]  Staff
[#  2 ]  Students
[#   ]  Other, Please describe:

 

Energy Conservation

[#  1]  Administrators
[#  4]  Faculty
[#  8]  Staff
[#  2]  Students
[#    ]  Other, Please describe

 

Sustainable Building and Facility Operations

[#  1]  Administrators
[#  1]  Faculty
[#  7]  Staff
[#  1]  Students
[#    ]  Other, Please describe

 

Communications and Outreach

[#  2]  Administrators
[#  3]  Faculty
[#  3]  Staff
[#  2]  Students
[#   ]  Other, Please describe


8) Please provide the name of the chair(s) of the committee for the 2009-2010 academic year, and indicate which stakeholder group the chair(s) represents.
If 2009-2010 academic year information is not yet available, please provide information for 2008-2009 instead.
Name of chair(s):
Position(s) (e.g., administrator, faculty, staff, student):

Campus Sustainability Steering Committee Co-chairs

Gary Nicksa, Vice President of Operations

Cutler Cleveland, Professor, Geography and Environment


Recycling and Waste Management Working Group

Richard Stack, Director, Sourcing & Procurement

Doug Zook, Associate Professor, School of Education

 

Energy Conservation Working Group

Scott Keene, Executive Director, Finance and Administration

Michael Gevelber, Associate Professor, College of Engineering

 

Sustainable Building and Facility Operations Working Group

David Flynn, Assistant Vice President, Facilities, Management, and Planning

Amy Barrett, Office of the Provost, Director of Academic

 

Communications and Outreach Working Group

Dennis Carlberg, Sustainability Director

Carolyn Clark, Associate Professor, Advertising & Public Relations


9) To whom does the committee report (e.g., president, vice president)?

The Steering Committee reports to the Office of the President.

The Working Groups report to the Steering Committee.

 

10) Please list key issues/programs that the committee has addressed or implemented since August 2008.

The following is a list of key issues/programs and responsibilities associated with each of the four working groups:

 

Recycling and Waste Management

Identifies goals, best practices, and opportunities to reduce, reuse, and recycle materials purchased by the University.

Specific Responsibilities

Develop strategies, policies, and procedures to:

·         Develop a sustainable purchasing program

·         Reduce environmental and carbon footprint in purchasing program

·         Increase efficient use of purchased products and materials

·         Increase recycled content and regional sourcing of purchased products and materials

·         Reduce waste

·         Increase the University’s recycling rate

·         Develop and recommend criteria for waste and recycling audits and action plans

·         Recommend pilot programs and pilot projects to test and verify the proposed strategies, policies and procedures

·         Recommend projects to the Sustainability Steering Committee

 

Projects Completed since August 2008:

·         Increased campus wide recycling rate from 10% in 2007 to 16% in 2008

·         Participated in Recyclemania

·         Paperless Payroll

·         Began participating in a yard waste composting program

·         Implemented Move-out Clothing & Shoe Drive – diverted 6.75 tons in May 2009

·         May of 2009 diverted 54 tons of furniture for reuse overseas

·         Installed bailers into all dining facilities, or containers to accommodate cardboard recycling

·         During 2009 commencement, recycled 7.5 tons of food waste, and 4 tons of plastic

 

Projects in development:

·         Waste Reduction Strategic plan

·         Supplier Sustainability Survey

·         Green purchasing policy

·         Duplex Printing

·         Clean Sweep for Charity at Move-out

·         Reusable Mug Program

·         Reusable Shopping Bag Program

·         Paperless Class Assignments

·         Paperless Benefits Program

·         Online Paperless Reporting using Microsoft Strategy Business Intelligence Toolset

 

Energy Conservation

The primary purpose of Energy Conservation Working Group is to identify goals, best practices, and opportunities to reduce the amount of energy consumed by the University.

Specific Responsibilities

Develop strategies, policies, and procedures to:

·         Increase energy efficiency on campus

·         Decrease the University’s carbon footprint

·         Develop and recommend criteria for energy audits and action plans

·         Recommend pilot programs and pilot projects to test and analyze the proposed strategies, policies and procedures.

·         Recommend projects to the Sustainability Steering Committee

 

Projects Completed since August 2008:

Mugar Library lighting retrofit Phase 1- new fixtures were fitted with super-T8 or T5 fluorescent bulbs, which typically use 20-25% less energy than the previously used T8 fluorescents.  Mugar Library will save over 2,000,000 kWh and $300,000 in energy related costs per year through these extensive lighting retrofits.

Mugar Library lighting retrofit Phase 2- additional area in the Mugar Library fitted with new volumetric fixtures, which distribute light outward rather than downward. Existing T12 fixtures were fitted with super-T8 or T5 fluorescent bulbs.

Occupancy sensors were installed in the book stacks and photo sensors were installed with daylight dimming ballasts located near the windows.

Computer Energy Settings Recommendations - IST Recommendation: Shut off the power to your monitor when not in use, and use S3 power-saving options in your computer's BIOS, Control Panel or System Preferences.

PC Power saving options

Standby:  Places your system into low power mode while idle. This is a good solution when you need to quickly return to system use.

Hibernate: Places a image of your working desktop on to your hard drive and completely shuts the system down. Good solution for laptops running low on battery power.

 

Where to set power saving options

PC BIOS: By pressing a selected Function key at system power up (F11 on some systems) you can review the system power settings in your BIOS. You should confirm that power management is enabled and that the S3 sleep state features are enabled. If you have a laptop make sure that the sleep state is enabled when you close the laptop cover.

Windows Vista: Go to Control Panel > System and Maintenance > Power Options. Set your computer for Power Saver and then select Change Plan Settings. We would recommend using the Balanced Power Plan. Try this out to see if it suits your needs. If it does not, adjust the settings using the Change plan settings. Also in the Control Panel select Personalize and then select screen saver and select (None). The use of a screen saver even if your monitor is shut off uses power.

 

Windows XP: Go to Start, click Control Panel > Performance and Maintenance > Power Options. Choose normal power schemes and select the amount of time you would like to have for your monitor to shut down and place system into stand by Ten to Fifteen minutes is recommended for both of these settings. Set hibernate to never for desktop systems. Set hibernate for laptops to a timeframe that will be reasonable if on battery power to save your work. To set your screen saver right click on your desktop and select properties set screen saver to (None). The use of a screen saver even if your monitor is shut off uses power.

 

Macintosh OS: Go to System Preferences > Energy Saver select sleep and slide the indicator to set the system and display 10 minutes would be the normal setting for systems. You may also want to place the hard disk to sleep when possible. You may want to set your system to schedule startup and shut down times. This option can be set using the Schedule button. You can set this to the time you will normally want the system to be on. Most people would set it to go on at the time that they wake in the morning and shut down as the go to bed.

 

General recommendations:

Set your screen saver to blank (none).

Shut your monitor and peripherals off when not in use.

Close the cover of your laptop when not in use.

Use shared printing resources when possible.

Use duplex printing when possible.

Set your monitor to sleep after about 10 minutes.

Make other settings as you wish, or go with suggested energy-saving pre-sets.

Experiment, and adjust as makes sense for your work style.

 

http://www.bu.edu/pcsc/green/

 

Projects in Construction:

Fitness & Recreation (FitRec) Lighting Retrofit - The proposed energy efficiency improvement includes (1) Replace all metal halide lamps in basketball courts, multipurpose courts and pool, with T5 high output fluorescent system equipped with electronic ballasts, acrylic lens and wire guard; (2) Re-lamp and re-ballast all T8 to Super T8 lamps and efficient ballasts in the buildings; (3) Replace all halogens with LED or CFL; (4) Install occupancy sensors in the basketball courts, multipurpose courts, lockers, and mechanical rooms.

Arena Lighting Retrofit - The recommendations are to re-lamp and re-ballast in the back supporting areas such as offices, lockers, restrooms, and loading docks

FitRec Parking Lighting Retrofit - The recommendations are to replace existing metal halide lamps with super T8 fluorescent, cold-temperature ballasts, and Vapor-Tight lens.  Currently these lights are turned off at night between 12 a.m. to 6 a.m. by a building management system.

Garage Lighting Retrofits -730-750 Comm Ave and 700 Comm Ave (Warren Towers) are being retrofitted from metal halide to T8 fluorescents with occupancy controls.

Projects in development:

Computer systems energy efficiency software – Boston University’s Information Technology group is testing Verdiem, a remote power management software, which allows computers to be powered down remotely when not in use.

 

Sustainable Building and Facility Operations

The primary purpose of Sustainable Building and Facility Operations Working Group is to identify goals, best practices, and opportunities to reduce the environmental impact of new and existing buildings, and grounds and operations through increased resource efficiency, improved indoor environmental quality, material selection, and operational procedures employed by the University.

Specific Responsibilities

·         Develop strategies, policies, and procedures to reduce the environmental footprint of building and grounds by:

·         Improving overall efficiency in buildings, grounds, and operations

·         Reducing the use of limited and non-renewable resources

·         Improving the indoor environmental quality for new and existing buildings

·         Decreasing the University’s carbon footprint

·         Develop and recommend criteria for building sustainability audit action plans

·         Recommend pilot programs and pilot projects to test and verify the proposed strategies, policies and procedures.

·         Recommend projects to the Sustainability Steering Committee.

 

Projects Completed since August 2008:

LEED Silver building interior, Sargent College Makechnie Study Center

Renovated in 2009, this building was awarded LEED-CI (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, Commercial Interiors) Silver in April 2009.

The 3,000 square foot Makechnie Study Center provides a broad range of media services for students, faculty, and staff. It includes a digital video-editing suite, 11 computer workstations, and is equipped with hi-definition LCD panels for viewing course related media, and developing PowerPoint presentations for classes.

Some features include:

Optimized energy performance (lighting power)

Lighting controls - daylight responsive controls within 15 ft of windows

Building materials incorporating 13.87% recycled content.

Student Village 2 (StuVi2) dormitory houses 975 residents. Some of its features include:

Energy efficient building design including enclosure, mechanical and electrical systems

Bathroom Exhaust Heat Recovery

HVAC Evaporative Cooling

Occupancy Sensors in dorm rooms

Dual Flush Toilets

Water Efficient showerheads

Bamboo walls in lobby and activity areas

888 Commonwealth Avenue Geothermal - The project involves the complete renovation and expansion o f the building.  When completed in the fall of 2009, the new building will occupy nearly 96,000 square feet with 100% of its heating and cooling provided by a geothermal ground-source heat pump system.  The system is comprised of six wells 1,500 feet deep. During the winter, the heat exchanger uses heat that is transferred from the Earth to the heat pump, which compresses the air to raise its temperature. In the summer, it absorbs excess heat from the air and blows the cooled air back into the building. This system is now installed and providing heating and cooling to the building as designed.

 

Projects in development:

LEED standards – The Sustainable Buildings and Operations Working Group is evaluating LEED standards for Building Design and Construction, Operations and Maintenance, and for Interior Design and Construction. The intent of this evaluation is to determine the level of LEED certification to recommend for building projects on campus.

Setting Policies and Procedures - The Sustainable Buildings and Operations Working Group is developing minimum standards for building design, site development, building energy efficiency, water efficiency, and material selection including the development of standard specifications where appropriate.

 

Communications and Outreach

The primary purpose of the Communications and Outreach Working Group is to engage the University community by promoting awareness and understanding of sustainability, and to communicate the accomplishments of the University’s, operations, academic, and administrative efforts to integrate sustainability into its everyday activates.

Specific Responsibilities

Develop strategies, policies, and procedures to:

·         Create a movement of campus sustainability to accelerate behavioral change through education and social engagement.

·         Create a sense of community within the University, showcasing what each college is doing within the field of sustainability, exchanging and sharing information.

·         Communicate what the University has accomplished, what it is doing, and what it plans to do to improve campus sustainability, education, and research

·         Communicate the University’s efforts and accomplishments to local and national media outlets

·         Recommend pilot programs and pilot projects to test and verify the proposed strategies, policies, and procedures.

·         Recommend projects to the Sustainability Steering Committee.

 

Projects in development:

EcoRep program

The Boston University EcoRep program is designed to engage students, faculty, and staff in understanding how individual behaviors effect the environment, while encouraging peers that individual incremental changes can make a large impact. The program helps increase overall sustainability awareness of the environmental, economic and social issues, and promotes green campus initiatives, such as recycling, food education, efficient energy and resource use and general sustainability.

 

Through education and activities, EcoReps disseminate information that they learn to their dorm/housemates, peers, and coworkers. Eco-Representatives gain an enhanced level of sustainability literacy while actively promoting change on campus.

Sustainability literacy is the capacity to perceive and interpret the relative health of environmental systems and to connect the environment to human physical, mental, and social health.

 

The program will begin its pilot phase in September 2009. Please see Item 55 for more details.

 

New Sustainability Website

The current website http://www.bu.edu/green/ is being re-designed with the intent that it will serve as a catalyst for behavioral change and be a portal to connect the entire university in its sustainability efforts. Students will be its primary audience as it serves the entire University population.  The new website will contain information on campus sustainability programs (energy conservation, recycling, rideshare, etc.), green projects (buildings, retrofits, renovations, etc.) and people (profiles of students, faculty, and staff). The website will also provide information on what individuals can do to reduce their environmental footprint and the impacts of current behavior. It will provide curriculum links to courses offered such as renewable energy and environmental law, and environmental research. It will be a clearing-house with links to green jobs and internships; sustainability related student organizations and clubs; and will have social networking features to help create and maintain a community for living a sustainable life.

 

The First-Year Student Outreach Project (FYSOP ) offers incoming Boston University students a unique opportunity to get settled in their new community by performing a week of community service before classes begin. We are involved in the area of Environment.

 

Green Campus Tour

We are developing a Green Campus Tour for prospective and incoming students. This will be integrated in the admissions process beginning with training in the fall of 2009 and will be available on the new website as a virtual tour.

 

Campus Outreach events to support sustainability efforts

T he sustainability staff regularly participates in interactive presentations with student and staff groups, forums, and events on campus to educate, seek input, and increase participation in the campus sustainability movement.


SUSTAINABILITY STAFF
11) Does your school employ sustainability staff (excluding student employees and interns)?
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please provide titles and number of sustainability staff.
[#  3 ]  Number of full-time staff (in FTE). Titles:  

[Dennis Carlberg, Sustainability Director]

Dennis Carlberg, AIA, LEED AP is an architect with over 25 years of experience. In January 2009 Dennis joined Boston University as its first Sustainability Director. He comes from a Boston area architectural firm where he was a partner, senior designer and chaired the sustainability committee, which he established in 2000. Dennis began his career at the Solar Energy Research Institute conducting daylighting research to reduce building energy consumption and improve the indoor environment. Dennis also co-chairs the Sustainability Committee at the Urban Land Institute – Boston, a committee dedicated to explore policies and solutions to address global climate change which are both feasible and effective at the nexus of energy, land use, infrastructure and real estate.

At Boston University, Dennis is responsible for:

·         Developing and implementing a strategy to integrate sustainability principles into the operational functions of the University.

·         Communicating, informing and promoting these principles and programs throughout the University.

·         Acting as the campus spokesperson on sustainability and provide outreach to local and national organizations as well as funding agencies.

Dennis received his Master of Architecture degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology where he was awarded the AIA Gold Medal. He received his Bachelor of Arts in Architecture from the University of California, Berkeley.

 

[Kelly Dunn, Sustainability Coordinator, Dining Services]

Kelly Dunn joined Boston University in October 2008 as the new sustainability coordinator for Dining Services.   She is responsible for developing, implementing and administering programs that will help Boston University become more sustainable in its foodservice operations.  Her main concentration areas include waste reduction, energy efficiency operations, responsible product procurement, and program evaluation. 

Prior to her role as sustainability coordinator, Ms. Dunn worked for the City of Cambridge as the recycling program manager.  Before working for Cambridge, she was the membership and program manager for Chefs Collaborative; a Boston-based nonprofit promoting sustainability in the food industry. 

Ms. Dunn holds a BA in Environmental Studies from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and is currently enrolled in a Sustainable Design graduate program at the Boston Architectural College.

 

[Susan Lebovits, Communications Specialist]

Susan Chaityn Lebovits joined Boston University in February, 2009 as the Communications Specialist focusing on sustainability.  Susan is responsible for developing and delivering communication plans that support the University's mission to reduce its environmental footprint. This includes everything from creating and implementing student outreach programs, to writing news stories on energy and environmental issues. She will serve as the editor of the new Sustainability website. Prior to her role as Communications Specialist, Susan was a full-time correspondent for The Boston Globe, where she wrote a weekly column profiling innovative people, and frequently touched on topics such as energy conservation and the environment.  A graduate of Syracuse University, Susan also writes for Ecosalon, an online magazine that promotes sustainable living.

 

[#  0 ]  Number of part-time staff (in FTE). Titles:]

 

12) Does the head of the sustainability staff report directly to the president or another high-level administrator (e.g., vice president, vice chancellor)?
[  ]  N/A
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please describe: Dennis Carlberg, Sustainability Director, reports to Scott Keene, Executive Director of Finance and Administration


OFFICE OR DEPARTMENT
13) Does your school have an office or department specifically dedicated to furthering sustainability on campus?
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please describe (including name of office or department and year created): Sustainability resides in Facilities Management & Planning


WEBSITE
14) Does your school have a website detailing its sustainability initiatives?
[  ]  No
[X] Yes. Please provide URL: http://www.bu.edu/green/

We have an active website, however we are developing a new website, please see note under item 10 above.

GREEN PURCHASING
15) Does your school have a formal green purchasing policy?

[  ] No

[X]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to full policy, if available:

Boston University’s green purchasing initiative encourages consolidated ordering, and scheduled deliveries, so goods arrive in bulk, and with less packaging. The University has also developed primary contacts with suppliers that offer “green” products for its offices and laboratories. Employees are always encouraged to consider environmental impact in all purchasing decisions.

Boston University’s procurement function has four strategic vision themes that guide procurement activities.  These vision themes, which have been in place for 6 years, provide guidance for yearly goal-setting and tactical plans. Vision theme #4 specifically addresses sustainability.  http://www.bu.edu/sourcing/about/strategic-vision-themes/

In late 2008, BU contracted with Aravo to assist in developing a supplier sustainability assessment program.  Purchasing policy and practice will begin pending assessment of current supply base and capabilities of suppliers.  http://www.aravo.com/solutions/sustain.html

A more formal green purchasing policy is currently being developed by the Recycling and Waste Management Working Group.


16) Does your school purchase ENERGY STAR qualified products?

[  ]  No
[X]  Some. Please describe:  While there is no defined policy, we are purchasing energy star copiers, kitchen equipment and computers.

[  ] All Please describe:

 

17) Does your school purchase environmentally preferable paper products (e.g., 100 percent post-consumer recycled content, certified by the Forest Stewardship Council)?
[  ]  No
[X]  Some. Please describe:

Boston University’s primary office supplier is Office Depot.  Office Depot’s recent sustainability assessment for Q1 2009 identified 22% of paper purchases as recycled  (by weight).

[  ]  All


18) Does your school purchase Green Seal, Environmental Choice certified, or biorenewable cleaning products?
[X] Yes, 90%

[  ]  Some

[  ] No

[  ]  All. Please describe:

19) Are your school's computer/electronics purchase decisions made in accordance with standards such as the Electronic Product Environmental Assessment Tool (EPEAT)?

[X ] Yes
[  ]  No
[]  Some

[  ]  All

20) Does your school use only pesticides that meet the standards for organic crop production set by the U.S. Department of Agriculture or Canadian Organic Standards (excluding on-campus farms)?
[  ]  No
[X]  Some. Please describe: 4 out of the 6 annual applications for the lawn fertilization program are organic.

[  ]  All

CLIMATE CHANGE & ENERGY

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY

21) Has your school completed a greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions inventory?
Please check all that apply.
[  ]  No.
[X] In progress. Please describe status and provide estimated completion date:

Boston University has begun the process of collecting data for the GHG inventory from 1990 to the present. The Metrics Focus Group (a subcommittee of the Energy Conservation Working Group) is developing the inventory of Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions. It also plans to establish a current Scope 3 inventory and develop estimates for prior years.

 [  ]  Yes.  Please provide total annual GHG emissions (in metric tons of CO2e). Also, include the start date for each year as well as the URL to each inventory, if available online, or attach the document.
2008:
2007:
2006:
2005:

COMMITMENT TO GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTION
The purchase of carbon offsets does not count toward greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for this indicator. They are counted in a subsequent indicator.

22) Has your school made a commitment to reducing GHG emissions by a specific amount?
[ X ]  No, however emissions goals are being developed with the Metrics Focus Group – see answer to item 21 above.
[  ]  Yes. Please list details.
Reduction level:
Baseline year:
Target date:
This project is under construction.
If you answered only "No" or "In progress" to question 21, please now skip to question 27.

REALIZED GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS
23) Has your school achieved a reduction in GHG emissions?
[  ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please list details.
Percentage reduced:
Baseline year:
Date achieved:

24) Please provide the total heating and cooling degree-days averaged over the past three years.
Data on total degree heating and cooling days is available at: http://www.degreedays.net/ . This information will be used to help reduce bias between schools in different climates.
Cooling degree days average over the past three years:
Heating degree days average over the past three years:

25) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-thousand-square-foot basis for the past three years.
Per-Thousand-Square-Foot Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total maintained building space in thousands of square feet.
2008:
2007:
2006:

26) Please provide GHG emissions figures on a per-full-time-student basis for the past three years.
Per-Student Emissions = Total CO2e in metric tons / Total number of full-time enrolled students.
2008:
2007:
2006:

ENERGY EFFICIENCY
27) What programs or technologies has your school implemented to improve energy efficiency (e.g., cogeneration plant, retrocommissioning of HVAC systems, performing system tune-ups, temperature setbacks)?
 

In addition to the efforts of the Energy Conservation Focus Group, Facilities Management & Planning has developed the following programs:

·         Central Campus heating upgrade uses the Linkageless control Micro Modulation System, coupled with an exhaust gas analyzer, which reduces energy consumption and emissions.

·         Temperature setbacks in dormitories and select buildings

·         Campus-wide energy audit conducted by students as part of energy course

·         Re-commissioning of HVAC system at 15 St. Marys Street

·         Rebalance ventilation air on all renovations, including laboratory renovations, to minimize waste, while meeting indoor air quality requirements.

·         Consolidated chilled water by putting the building cooling loads on the central plant.

·         There is a stream trap program in place to prevent and monitor for steam leaks.


ENERGY CONSERVATION
28) Do you facilitate programs that encourage members of the campus community to reduce energy use (e.g., cash incentives, signs reminding individuals to turn off lights and appliances)?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

·         Ten Sustainable Actions Posters: Beginning in fall of 2009, a monthly poster campaign (series of 10) will educate students, staff, and faculty, and encourage behavior change in areas from turning off lights and powering down computers to changing incandescent lights for compact fluorescent bulbs.

·         In the fall of 2009 we will pilot an EcoRep program, which students connect with peers on a regular basis to educate them on energy and environmental issues through presentation, activities and programs. The pilot will be done in the West Campus dorms. This program will dovetail with the Ten Sustainable Actions campaign.

·         FYSOP- The First-Year Student Outreach Project (FYSOP) offers incoming Boston University students a unique opportunity to get settled in their new community by performing a week of service before classes even begin. This group is involved in the area of Environment.

·         Ten Sustainable Actions Communication on reusable recycling bags and water bottles, which are distributed to 11,500 students

·         Sustainability Pledge is being developed for the new website

·         On campus activities such as Earthweek and Earth Hour


RENEWABLE ENERGY GENERATION
29)  Does your school generate renewable electricity?
[X]  No,

[  ]  Yes. Please specify percentage of overall electricity generated from each of the following sources and describe details below.
[    %]  B100 biodiesel
[    %]  Clean biomass
[    %]  Concentrating solar power (CSP)
[    %]  Geothermal

[    %]  Low-impact hydropower
[    %]  Solar photovoltaics

[    %]  Wind

[    %]  Other

Description:

30) Does your school have solar hot water systems?
[ X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please specify number of systems and total BTUs generated annually, if available:

RENEWABLE ENERGY PURCHASE
31) Has your school purchased electric energy from renewable sources or renewable energy credits (RECs)?
RECs and electricity from renewable sources must be Green-e certified or meet the requirements of the Green-e standard.

[  ]  No

[X] Yes, there is a renewable component from the electricity that we purchase, however these are not Green-e certified:
   Approximately 10% is from wind, solar, and low-impact hydro.

   Biomass 3%

   Geothermal 4%

   Small hydro electric 2%

   Wind less 1%

   Large hydroelectric 23%
Date of most recent contract: December 2006, good through June 2010
Quantity (kWh): 158 MkWh
Percentage of your total electric energy use that it represents: 43%

32) Has your school purchased non-electric energy from renewable sources?
[ X ]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Date of most recent contract:
Quantity (BTUs):
Percentage of your total non-electric energy use that it represents:


ON-SITE COMBUSTION

PLEASE NOTE THIS IS NOT CO-GEN
33) Please provide total BTUs of energy for heating and cooling from on-site combustion:

                                                 Oil                                        Natural Gas              Steam (offsite)

Total                                       356,666  MMBtu               598,980  MMBtu         178,041  MMBtu

 

Note: 1 MMBtu = 1,000,000 Btu

 

34) Please list each fuel source (e.g., coal, natural gas, oil) and the percent of overall BTUs derived from that source:

Oil                        Natural Gas       Steam (offsite)

31%                     53%                      16%         

35) Is any on-site combustion for heating and cooling derived from renewable sources?
[X]  No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe.
Percentage on-site combustion derived from renewable sources: [   %]
Total BTUs of energy generated from renewable sources: [#      ]
Description of renewable energy sources used for on-site combustion for heating and cooling:

FOOD & RECYCLING
The food portion of this category is covered in a separate dining survey.

RECYCLING OF TRADITIONAL MATERIALS
36) Please indicate which traditional materials your institution recycles (check all that apply).
[   ] None
[X ]  Aluminum
[X ]  Cardboard
[X ]  Glass
[X ]  Paper
[X ]  Plastics (all)
[   ]  Plastics (some)
[X]  Other (Clean milk and juice containers)

 

37) Diversion rate: [9 % University, 7% Dining, 16% Total]

RECYCLING OF ELECTRONIC WASTE
38) Does your institution have an electronics recycling program?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. If available, please indicate the total annual weight or volume of each material collected for recycling or reuse.
[2.37 tons]  Batteries
[unknown] Cell phones
[68 tons] Computers and other E-waste
[1.4 tons] Light bulbs
[unknown] Printer cartridges

[13.8 tons] Appliances

 

COMPOSTING (ASIDE FROM DINING FACILITIES)
39) What percentage of your campus's landscaping waste is composted or mulched?

[90%]

40) Do you provide composting receptacles around campus in locations other than dining halls (e.g., in residence halls, offices, academic buildings)?
[X] No
[  ]  Yes. Please describe:

SOURCE REDUCTION
41) Do you have any source-reduction initiatives (e.g., end-of-semester furniture or clothing swaps and collections)?
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. Please describe:

·         Implemented Move-out Clothing & Shoe Drive – diverted 6.75 tons in May 2009

·         May of 2009 diverted 54 tons of furniture for reuse overseas. This furniture and large item share program has been in place for a decade, though it is not an official university program.

 

GREEN BUILDING

GREEN BUILDING POLICY
42) Does your school have a formal green building policy?
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. Please describe policy and provide URL to the full policy, if available:

To build to LEED certifiable; a more complete policy is being developed by the Sustainable Building and Operations Working Group. Projects over 50, 000 SF are required to be LEED certifiable. A more complete policy is being developed.


GREEN BUILDING STANDARDS
43)
Please indicate LEED-certified buildings
[#  2 ]  Total number of LEED-certified buildings.
[160,000 sq ft]  LEED Certified - 670 Albany Street
[ 3,000  sq ft]  LEED-CI Silver - Sargent College Makechnie Study Center

[ 0  sq ft]  Gold-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[ 0 sq ft]  Platinum-level (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

44) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED certification criteria but are not certified.
[#  0    ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED criteria
[    sq ft]  Certified-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Silver-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Gold-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Platinum-level criteria met, but not certified (combined gross square footage). Please list building names:

45) Please indicate buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[#   0 ]  Total number of ENERGY STAR buildings. Please list building names:

Energy Star Labeling is being considered by the Sustainable Building and Facility Operations Working Group for LEED Certification, under the LEED Operations and Maintenance program.
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

RENOVATIONS AND RETROFITS
46) Please indicate LEED-EB certified buildings.
[#  0    ]  Total number of LEED-EB certified buildings. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

Sustainable Building and Facility Operations Working Group is developing a LEED O& M (formally LEED-EB) program for campus.

47) Please indicate buildings that meet LEED-EB certification criteria but are not certified.
[#    0  ]  Total number of buildings that meet LEED-EB criteria but are not certified. Please list building names: See #46 above.
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

48) Please indicate renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled.
[#    0  ]  Total number of renovated buildings that are ENERGY STAR labeled. Please list building names:
[    sq ft]  Combined gross square footage.

49) What energy-efficiency technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., HVAC systems, motion sensors, ambient light sensors, T5 lighting, LED lighting, timers, laundry technology)?    For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of maintained building space have been retrofitted with motion sensors; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).

 

In addition to those identified in item 27 above:

·         Installed passive duel technology sensors in bathrooms, and ceiling mounted sensors in all corridors in elevator lobbies.

·         L E D light bulbs have been installed in both the lobby and the exterior of select buildings.

·         All new exit signs are replaced with L E D illuminated signs

·         There is a stream trap program in place to prevent and monitor for steam leaks.

·         Meters have been installed on cooling towers and irrigation systems to monitor consumption.  

·         Major cooling equipment has been upgraded with significantly more efficient equipment.

 

We have installed passive duel technology sensors in all bathrooms at the Medical Campus, and ceiling mounted sensors in all corridors in the elevator lobbies. L E D light bulbs have been installed at 700 Albany Street in both the lobby and the exterior. All Medical Campus renovations incorporate night setbacks and occupancy controls. We reduce ventilation air on all renovations, including laboratory renovations. Also, we reduce laboratory ventilation when air balancing. Any project involving HVAC we incorporate energy savings measures. We have consolidated chilled water loads onto very high efficiency equipment, and are eliminating domestic water wasting equipment, by putting the cooling loads on the central plant.  We are replacing all AC units with heat pumps at the Medical Campus. Temperature setback are being implemented. All new equipment being brought online has building automation to control AHU’s compressor, vacuums, and dryers. Meters have been installed on cooling towers and irrigation systems to monitor consumption.  
 
We upgraded major cooling equipment with significantly more efficient equipment. The vacuum pump in 790 Harrison Ave has been converted from water cooled to air cooled. Also installed is a new high efficiency water heater and a new indoor cooling tower.
 
We have installed AC-2, AC-5, and AC-6 AHU’s, automation, and VFD’s  in 70 E Concord street. As well as removed the ice machine from city water to condensing tower water.   
 
In 75 East Newton street we installed a new heat pump, automation, and new reheat valves. Also installed is a new VFD  on AHU-2 and a new high efficiency motor.
 
778 Harrison we reduced 30 fans to 2 on VFD’s, and the exhaust system has been replaced.


50) What water-conservation technologies have you installed in existing buildings (e.g., low-flow faucets, low-flow showerheads, waterless urinals, dual-flush toilets, gray water systems, laundry technology)?   For each technology, please indicate the number and type of fixtures installed, and the number of buildings in which those fixtures are installed. If possible, include either the percentage of the overall campus fixtures each type represents or the percentage of overall maintained building space that has been renovated with the technology (e.g., 20 buildings representing 10 percent of the maintained building space have been retrofitted with low-flow faucets; thus, 10 percent of the total maintained building space in square feet would be the desired data).   

 

·         Dual-flush toilets-Approx 200, located in Student Village 2

·         Low-flow showerheads: There are over 3,000 showerheads at BU, of which are all between 2.5 and 3.5 gpm (gallons per minute). At least 300 have been retrofitted to a 1.5 gpm showerhead, with another 1,000 slated to be complete before September 2009.

·         Low flow (1.5 to 2.5 gpm depending on use) lavatory aerators have been installed in over 3,000 locations.


51) What percentage of your institution's non-hazardous construction and demolition waste is diverted from landfills?

[ 0  %]

STUDENT INVOLVEMENT

RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITIES
52) Are there any sustainability-themed residential communities or housing options at your school?

[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please provide details below.

Name of program: The Harriet E. Richards Co-op House

http://www.her-house.org/

Type of community (e.g., hall, building, house): Student house
Number of students involved: 25
Additional details: Shared cooking, cleaning, recycling, composting, gardening

 

NEW STUDENT ORIENTATION
53) Does a portion of your new student orientation specifically cover sustainability?
[  ]  No
[X]  Yes. Please describe how sustainability is incorporated (e.g., information sessions, green tour):

This summer our sustainability message is integrated into orientation through informational presentations, a Green Campus Tour, SPLASH, which is an activities fair, and the First-Year Student Outreach Project (FYSOP) which offers incoming Boston University students a unique opportunity to get settled in their new community by performing a week of service before classes even begin. This group is involved in the area of environment. The Green Campus Tour will become more integrated into the orientation process through tour guide training beginning in the fall ’09 semester.

 

INTERNSHIPS/OUTREACH OPPORTUNITIES
54) Does your school offer on-campus office-based sustainability internships or jobs for students?
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes.

student:
[#   5  ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 38
[#   1  ]  Unpaid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student: 10

55) Does your school have residence hall Eco-Reps or other similar programs to promote behavioral change on campus?
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please provide details below, and indicate URL if available:
[#  ]  Paid positions. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[#  ]  Positions that award academic credit. Average hours worked weekly per student:
[#  TBD]  Uncompensated positions. Average hours worked weekly per student TBD.

The EcoRep program will begin a pilot phase in September 2009. We anticipate approximately 15 students in one dorm tower at West Campus will participate so we can benchmark sister towers. In addition, we anticipate incorporating a group of “at large” EcoReps who will participate the communications, leadership and in our monthly meetings.

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
56) Does your school have active student-run organizations devoted to sustainability efforts on campus?
[  ]  No
[13]  Yes. Please provide total number of active organizations, names of organizations, a brief description of each, and URLs, if available:
ESO, Environmental Student Organization – http://people.bu.edu/eso/
Energy Club - http://people.bu.edu/buenergy/
BU Bikes – bikes@bu.edu
BU Environmental Law Society –busl.els@gmail.com
Organic Gardening - ogc@bu.edu
NET Impact – http://netimpact.smgmba.com/
Public Interest Project – http://people.bu.edu/pip/
Hunger Relief - hunger@bu.edu

Vegetarian Society -vegsoc@bu.edu

Slow Food BU – http://www.slowfoodbu.blogspot.com

 

SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGES AND COMPETITIONS
57) Does your school organize any sustainability challenges/competitions for your campus and/or with other colleges?
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. Please list details for all competitions.

Name of competition: Recyclemania; 2009

Year initiated: BU started in 2009
Frequency of competition: Annually, 10 week duration
Participants: 26,494 (all students staff and faculty)
Incentives: National winners receive an award at the National Recycling
Coalition conference in Portland, Oregon.  Other schools are encouraged
to publicly congratulate the division winners.
Goal of competition: Recycle as much as possible and throw out as
little as possible.  Raise awareness for waste reduction.
Percent of energy/water/waste reduced: recycled 259,442 pounds of
trash.  Average recycling rate of 13.37% over 9 weeks.  (compare to
monthly average of 11% in 2009)
Lasting effects of competition: Raised awareness for waste reduction.
Website: http://www.recyclemania.org/


TRANSPORTATION

CAMPUS MOTOR FLEET
58) How many vehicles are in your institution's fleet?

[# 166]


59) Please list the number of alternative-fuel vehicles in each class.
[#   3  ]  Hybrid. Please list makes and models:

 2009 Toyota Highlander, 1

 2008 Toyota Highlander, 2
[#  0  ]  Electric. Please describe type of vehicles:
[#  0  ]  Biodiesel. Please describe type of vehicles and list biodiesel blend(s) used:
[#      ]  Other. Please describe:

 
60) What is the average GHG emission rate per passenger mile of your institution's motorized fleet?
[#        ]  pounds of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) per passenger mile traveled.

Boston University just implemented a fleet management program in late 2008 with PHHAral.  Measurements and data will be available in 2010/2011.

http://www.phharval.com/fleetServices/fuelExpenseManagement/index.html


LOCAL TRANSPORTATION ALTERNATIVES
61) Does your school offer incentives for carpooling?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe details of the program including the type of the incentive and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students): 

Employees and students who are interested in carpooling can be matched through MassRides. MassRides marketing materials are on display and available at the Parking & Transportation Services office and on the Parking & Transportation Services website http://www.bu.edu/parking/rideshare/index.html .  Employees and students can sign up for a University carpool-parking permit at the Parking & Transportation Services Office or by calling 617-353-2160. A survey conducted by the University in 2008 suggests carpool trips increase by 1 percent during that year.

The University implemented a formalized vanpool program in May 2003. University employees and students who are interested in vanpooling are matched through Mass Rides.  The University also developed and launched it own RideShare ride-matching website; allowing students and staff to seek like-minded commuters who wish to participate in carpools and vanpools http://www.bu.edu/parking/rideshare/index.html .


As an incentive to rideshare, the University offers preferential parking to all carpoolers and vanpoolers through its Parking & Transportation Services Office.


62) Does your school offer public transportation subsidies?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[X ]  Yes. Please describe the program including the size of the discount (as a percent of full price) and eligible community members (e.g., faculty, staff, students):

Full time faculty and staff members may purchase passes through the University using payroll deduction. Up to $230 of the MBTA pass monthly cost is deducted on a pre-tax basis.

Students can apply for the MBTA’s Semester Pass Program online through a portal called Student Link. This program allows students to save approximately 11% of the monthly T-Pass price by prepaying for four monthly passes.

Boston University’s Charles River Campus continues to have one of the largest Student Semester MBTA Pass Programs in Massachusetts with over 3,950 students participating each fall and spring semester.

Zipcar, a car-sharing service, offers membership in their program at the reduced rate of $25 per year to members of the BU community who are 21 years of age or older. There are multiple Zipcar vehicles located on the Charles River Campus.


63) Does your school provide free transportation around campus?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. Please describe: 

The Boston University Shuttle (The BUS), an intercampus shuttle service started in September 2004 between the Charles River Campus and the Medical Campus services 11 stops.  In September 2007, morning and afternoon peak-time BUS service was added which increased its frequency and capacity by 50% Mondays – Thursdays and by 33% on Fridays.  During the academic year, the BUS operates with 15-minute peak-time service frequency (7AM – 10AM & 4PM – 7PM) Mondays – Thursdays, and with 20-minute peak-time service frequency on Fridays.  The BUS provides 30-minute off-peak service from 7AM until 11PM. The BUS operates weekdays during the summer terms on a 30-minute frequency schedule between the hours of 7AM and 11PM.  More information about the BUS service is available online at http://www.bu.edu/thebus .

Late night and evening shuttle service was added in September 2008. The Evening & Weekend Shuttle administered by Parking & Transportation Services, provides service 7 days a week during the evening and early morning hours. The shuttle which runs until 2:00AM Sunday-Wednesday and 4:00AM Thursday-Saturday is intended to provide the Boston University community with convenient transportation throughout the Charles River Campus exclusively.

 

64) Does your school operate a free transportation shuttle to local off-campus destinations?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[ X ]  No, although BU’s intercampus shuttle route passes through local communities
[  ]  Yes. Please describe:

 

BICYCLE PROGRAM
65) Does your school offer a bicycle-sharing/rental program or bicycle repair services?
[ X ]  No, although the BU Bikes club provide bicycle repairs and offers bicycle repair workshops.
[ ]  Yes. Please provide details below.
Year created:
Number of bikes available:
Fees for participation:
Repair services provided:

CAR-SHARING PROGRAM
66) Does your school partner with a car-sharing program?
[  ]  No
[ X]  Yes. Please provide details below.

Year created:
Total number of vehicles:
Number of hybrid vehicles:
Fee for membership:


Zipcar, a car-sharing service, offers membership in their program at the reduced rate of $25 per year to members of the BU community who are 21 years of age or older. There are 19 Zipcar vehicles located on campus or immediately adjacent to campus. There are 6 Zipcars on the Charles River Campus and 2 on the Medical Campus plus 11 at three locations immediately across the street. Three of the Zipcars are hybrids.

PLANNING
67) Does your school have policies that support a pedestrian-friendly or bike-friendly campus (e.g., in the school's master plan, a policy prohibiting vehicles from the center of campus)?
[  ]  N/A. Please explain:
[  ]  No
[ X ]  Yes. Please describe:

The City of Boston’s first designated bike lane runs through campus. These bike lanes were a result of an initiative of the BU Bikes student organization in cooperation with Boston Bikes.

This year Boston University won Bike Friendly Business Awards from the City of Boston; Silver for the Medical Campus and Bronze for the Charles River Campus in 2009 http://www.cityofboston.gov/environmentalandenergy/greenawards/winners09.asp

Commuting cyclists can register with the Boston University. Bike racks are available in all major locations and buildings on campus. Bicycle maps and safety information are available free to everyone who registers and an interactive map of all bicycle parking locations is available online. Locker and shower locations vary depending on buildings and departments.

On average there are 160 bicycles registered with the Boston University Medical Campus, and approximately 7 percent of the commuting population bicycle to campus.

6 bike racks, and two cages.

 

There are approximately 217 bicycle racks (2,176 bike capacity) available to employees and students located at the Charles River Campus.

To address bicycle safety issues, employees and students can take advantage of free bike registration with the University. They keep an accurate record of the registered bikes and provide identification stickers at no charge. The decal has a unique registration number and marks each bike as registered to deter possible thieves. When stolen bikes are recovered the sticker helps the Boston University Police return them to their rightful owners.

http://www.bu.edu/police/bikeregistration

 

University bicyclists also have the unique opportunity to bike to work or class using two major Bike Paths. One is the Dr. Paul Dudley White Bike Path (17 miles) and the Fenway Bike Path, both of which are safe bicycle routes. Thus, employees and students have a viable commute option from adjacent cities, towns and Boston neighborhoods.

On the Medical Campus, we work with Boston Transportation Department (BTD) on all aspects of pedestrian safety. We have installed 7 bike racks and two access-only bike cages with free bike pumps in each bike cage, allowing a capacity of 320 bicycles.

Both campuses are bike-friendly campus with several cycling events including: bike to work/school events, Bike luncheon, Bike Safety Check –up, Bike T shirts giveaways, and Raffles.


68) What percentage of individuals commute to campus via environmentally preferable transportation (e.g., walking, bicycling, carpooling, using public transit)?
[     %]

Medical Campus:

Carpool                     4%

Mass Transit            56%  *

Bike/Walk/Other       15%

* includes shuttle use

 

On the Charles River Campus:

Carpool                  12 

Mass Transit         4,333  pass holders


STATISTICS

69) Campus setting:
[  ] Rural
[  ] Suburban
[ X]  Urban
[  ]  Other. Please describe:

70) Total number of buildings: [# 324]
71) Combined gross square footage of all buildings: [14,394,852 square feet]
72) Full-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [17,013 undergrad; 6,423 grad]
73) Part-time enrollment (undergraduate and graduate): [1,521 undergrad; 4,579 grad]
74) Part-time enrollment as a proportion to a full-time course load: [# 1/3 ]
75) Percent of full-time students that live on campus:
[  75 %]

Questions 76-87 are for informational purposes only; responses will NOT be included in the Report Card evaluation process.

OTHER AREAS OF ENVIRONMENTAL ENGAGEMENT

Please mark an "X" next to each item that applies to your institution.

76) Outdoors club: [ x ]
77) Disposable water bottle ban: [  ] BU is switching over to water filtration system
78) Participation in Recyclemania: [  x]
79) Student trustee position: [  ]
80) Environmental science/studies major: [x  ]
81) Environmental science/studies minor or concentration: [ x ]
82) Graduate-level environmental program: [x  ]
83) Student green fee: [  ]
84) Alumni green fund: [  ]
85) Revolving loan fund for sustainability projects: [x  ]
86) Campus garden or farm: [x  ]
87) Single-stream recycling: [  ]

 

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